Addenda

Fresh Tracks

28 Sep

D. C. Schindler on talking about reality humanly

Category: Fresh Tracks
By: Eve Ruotsinoja
Published: 09/28/16

MHA uncut

In this release of MHA uncut, philosopher D. C. Schindler discusses the work and thought of German philosopher Robert Spaemann (b. 1927) as represented in a new collection of essays edited by Schindler and his wife, Jeanne Heffernen Schindler, entitled A Spaemann Reader: Philosophical Essays on Nature, God, and the Human Person (Oxford, 2015).

Here, Ken Myers and Schindler discuss Spaemann’s defense of anthropomorphism and how the loss of an anthropomorphic sensibility leads, paradoxically, to an arrogant anthropocentrism. This inability to “talk about reality humanly” ultimately leads to a culture that is antihuman. Login now to listen to the full interview. 

Also included in this release is an archive interview with D. C. Schindler from Volume 120 of the Journal on his book The Catholicity of Reason.

(MHA uncut is available to current subscribers for a limited time and is a feature of the Fresh Tracks section in Addenda. MHA uncut previews unedited interviews of guests who will later appear in the MARS HILL AUDIO Journal.)

Other releases of MHA uncut include:

4 Aug

William Cavanaugh on engaging with a wounded world

Category: Fresh Tracks
Published: 08/04/16

MHA uncut

Political theologian, William T. Cavanaugh, joins us in this new installment of MHA uncut to discuss his book Field Hospital: The Church's Engagement with a Wounded World. If part of the Church’s mission is to offer healing to a wounded world, does it make sense for the Church to engage with the world in terms that are defined by its wounds? Must the Church “gain influence” or “play by the rules” of the public sphere before she can express and give what she has to offer? Login now to access this extended interview about theology's bearing on economics, religious freedom, and politics.

Also included in this release is an archive interview with William Cavanaugh from Volume 95 of the Journal on his book Being Consumed: Economics and Christian Desire.

(MHA uncut is available to current subscribers for a limited time and is a feature of the Fresh Tracks section in AddendaMHA uncut previews unedited interviews of guests who will later appear in the MARS HILL AUDIO Journal.)

Other releases of MHA uncut include:

1 Mar

Francis J. Beckwith on public reasoning

Category: Fresh Tracks
Published: 03/01/16

MHA uncut

Baylor University professor of legal philosophy, Francis J. Beckwith, joins us in this extended conversation to talk about his book Taking Rites Seriously: Law, Politics, and the Reasonableness of Faith (Cambridge, 2015). Beckwith's book examines how religious claims and religiously motivated arguments are bracketed within public legal contexts due to the dictates of secular rationalism, which operate under the assumption that the only rational (and hence publically acceptable) claims are those that can be demonstrated with experimental proof or verifiable evidence. 

Login now to hear more about why this narrow definition of reasonableness is problematic.

Also included in this feature is an archive release of legal scholar Steven D. Smith discussing his book The Disenchantment of Secular Discourse (Harvard, 2010).

 

MHA uncut is available to current subscribers for a limited time and is a feature of the Fresh Tracks section in AddendaMHA uncut previews unedited interviews of guests who will later appear in the MARS HILL AUDIO Journal.

Other releases of MHA uncut include:

 

11 Feb

Peter Harrison on the territories of science and religion

Category: Fresh Tracks
Published: 02/11/16

MHA uncut

The Territories of Science and Religion (University of Chicago Press, 2015)

Are the current categories that frame the conflict between science and religion legitimate? To what extent do we reinforce this conflict by engaging in dialogues which presume that both science and religion are primarily propositional and intellectual activities? In this extended conversation with historian Peter Harrison, Harrison examines how the modern notions of science and religion are cultural developments that significantly differ from their pre-modern predecessors. While recognizing that both science and religion have their distinctive integrities, Harrison challenges his readers to rethink the categories we use to imagine the relationship between religion and science.

For an introduction to the argument in Harrison's The Territories of Science and Religion, check out this article by Harrison entitled Christianity and the rise of western science.

Also included in this week’s MHA uncut is an archive release from Volume 101 of the Journal in which William Cavanaugh discusses his book The Myth of Religious Violence. Login now to access these interviews.

Other releases of MHA uncut include:

12 Jan

John Durham Peters on Elemental Media

Category: Fresh Tracks
Published: 01/12/16

MHA uncut

The most important thing about a medium is not its content, but its form: the various infrastructures that enable it to exist, the way it reorganizes its surrounding environment, the presuppositions that it causes us to make. These are the features of media that communications professor, John Durham Peters, wants us to take note of in his book The Marvelous Clouds: Toward a Philosophy of Elemental Media. “Social media,” for example, allows anyone to be a producer of public content. The infrastructures of online storage capacity and easy uploading enable the now ubiquitous “comment sections” in which thoughts that had once been privately edited or suppressed become public gossip, unfiltered vitriols, and banal updates. When we pay attention to the elements of our media, we learn much about how they can reinforce or change many of the philosophical assumptions of our cultures.

This week’s MHA uncut features an interview with John Durham Peters on his book The Marvelous Clouds (University of Chicago Press, 2015). Login now to access this new release on the perennial and elemental functions of “new media.”

Other releases of MHA uncut include:

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