Addenda

What We're Reading

14 Aug

"Music and the Spheres" Lecture Available On-line

Category: What We're Reading
By: Ken Myers
Published: 08/14/05

In April of 2004, Ken Myers participated in a conference held in Charlottesville and sponsored by the Center for Christian Study. . . .

In April of 2004, Ken Myers participated in a conference held in Charlottesville and sponsored by the Center for Christian Study. The Conference was called "Music and the Spheres: Music, Faith and Culture in America Today," and the speakers included theologian and pianist Jeremy Begbie (interviewed on Volume 64 of the Journal), conductor and music professor John Hodges (a guest six times, as listed here), and film composer J. A. C. Redford (who also writes chamber and sacred choral music, as discussed in conversation on Volume 41 and Volume 67). These lectures have been available for sale from the Center for Christian Study on cassette or CD (call 434-817-1050 to order), and they have given permission for us to make an mp3 version of the lecture by Ken Myers available for free download from our webpage. In this lecture, Ken examines ways in which social configuration of music in our lives and the assumptions we typically have about beauty and order reflect larger patterns of disorder in modernity. The Center for Christian Study has other lectures available in mp3 format through its web page, www.studycenter.net. [Posted August 2005, KAM]

14 Jul

More on Flannery O'Connor

Category: What We're Reading
By: Ken Myers
Published: 07/14/05

Listeners who appreciated learning more about Flannery O'Connor's work from Ralph C. Wood and Susan Srigley (volume 73) will also be interested in two other books about O'Connor recently released. . . .

Listeners who appreciated learning more about Flannery O'Connor's work from Ralph C. Wood and Susan Srigley (volume 73) will also be interested in two other books about O'Connor recently released. Christina Bieber Lake's The Incarnational Art of Flannery O'Connor (Mercer University Press) examines "O'Connor's concerted effort to defy the Gnostic tendencies in American thought." Lake argues that "Bodies in O'Connor stories serve always to remind characters and readers of what the Incarnation validates—the inescapable reality of human embodiment." Meanwhile, in Return to Good and Evil: Flannery O'Connor's Response to Nihilism, (published by Roman & Littlefield in 2002 and just released in paperback by Lexington Books), Henry T. Edmondson, III, makes the case that O'Connor agreed with "Nietzsche's complaint that the modern age is populated by 'last men,' individuals without faith, vision, purpose, or valor. Her solution, unlike Nietzsche's, was a recovery of the concepts of good and evil, not their rejection." [Posted July 2005, KAM]

16 May

Georges Bernanos

Category: What We're Reading
By: Amy L. Graeser
Published: 05/16/05

Subscribers who enjoyed the Volume 55 interview with J. C. Whitehouse on Georges Bernanos can now learn more about the French Catholic writer by visiting the MARS HILL AUDIO Georges Bernanos web page. [Posted May 2005, ALG]

Subscribers who enjoyed the Volume 55 interview with J. C. Whitehouse on Georges Bernanos can now learn more about the French Catholic writer by visiting the MARS HILL AUDIO Georges Bernanos web page. [Posted May 2005, ALG]

14 Apr

Bishop N. T. Wright and Justification

Category: What We're Reading
By: Ken Myers
Published: 04/14/05

The Anglican Bishop of Durham N. T. Wright (commonly addressed as Tom) has written a great deal about the identity of the Church as the people of God called to challenge the reigning gods in the world around them. But while Wright is profoundly interested in questions of Church and culture, much that is written about his work concerns his understanding of soteriology, specifically the way he understands justification. . . .

The Anglican Bishop of Durham N. T. Wright (commonly addressed as Tom) has written a great deal about the identity of the Church as the people of God called to challenge the reigning gods in the world around them. But while Wright is profoundly interested in questions of Church and culture, much that is written about his work concerns his understanding of soteriology, specifically the way he understands justification. If you're interested in a survey of the issues at stake, you may want to listen to a series of four lectures offered at the Center for Christian Study in Charlottesville, Virginia, and available for download online .

The lectures were given by Bill Wilder, director of graduate ministries at the Center. Wilder studied at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary and at Union Theological Seminary in Virginia, and is the author of Echoes of the Exodus Narrative in the Context and Background of Galatians 5:18 (Peter Lang, 2001). The title for the series is The Doctrine of Justification in the Work of N.T. Wright, and the four lecture titles are I Love to Tell the Story: The Narrative Substructure of Paul's Theology; Adam, Israel, Servant, Christ: Does Covenant Theology Get it Wright? To Whom it Belongs: The 'Dis'puted Righteousness of God; The Importance of Definition: Righteousness, Justification, Faith & Works. [Posted April 2005, KAM]

14 Apr

Common Objects of Love

Category: What We're Reading
By: Ken Myers
Published: 04/14/05

In 2001, just days after the events of 9/11, moral philosopher Oliver O'Donovan gave a series of lectures for Calvin College and Calvin Seminary. The title for the series was taken from Augustine's The City of God, in which he defines a political community as "a multitude of rational beings united by agreeing to share the things they love." . . .

In 2001, just days after the events of 9/11, moral philosopher Oliver O'Donovan gave a series of lectures for Calvin College and Calvin Seminary. The title for the series was taken from Augustine's The City of God, in which he defines a political community as "a multitude of rational beings united by agreeing to share the things they love." The lectures were subsequently published under the same name, Common Objects of Love. In them, O'Donovan reflects on the links between knowledge and love, on the nature of the Church as a moral community, and on the pernicious effects of institutions of "publicity," the massive volumes of mediated communication which subvert community in the fullest sense. [Posted April 2005, KAM]

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