MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 29

Brand Luther: Andrew Pettegree on Martin Luther, Printing, and the Making of the Reformation

It is often noted that Martin Luther’s Reformation could never have advanced the way it did without the technology of the printing industry. While the coincidence of Luther and the printing press undoubtedly contributed to the Reformation’s rapid spread, the printing world at the time of Luther was largely under the patronage of the Catholic church (a large portion of which went toward the printing of indulgence certificates), and it was not inevitable, according to Andrew Pettegree, that “print would become an agent of insurrection.” In his book, Brand Luther: 1517, Printing, and the Making of the Reformation, historian Andrew Pettegree shows how Luther’s facility for writing in German and his intuitive business sense not only spread ideas and incited controversy, but completely transformed the distribution model of the printing industry. 56 minutes.

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    1. Introduction
    Brand Luther: 1517, Printing, and the Making of the Reformation (Penguin Books, 2015)
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    2. On the printing industry before Luther and Luther's reversal of the normal economics of the book trade
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    3. On why people bought Luther's books
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    4. On early modern printing regulations
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    5. On the “German-ness” of Luther and his writings
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    6. On the relationship between Martin Luther and Lucas Cranach
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    7. On Luther's writing style and the spread of the Reformation
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    8. On the business of printing and selling books and Luther's involvement with the publishing of his own works
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    9. On Luther's personality
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    10. On whether the Reformation would have happened without Luther
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    11. On Luther and the unity of the Church