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MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 134

Guests on Volume 134: Chris Armstrong, on what C. S. Lewis knew (and we need to know) about the culture and faith of medieval Christianity; Grevel Lindop, on the unique poetic imagination of poet, novelist, and theologian Charles Williams, “the third Inkling”; Michael Martin, on how the experience of Beauty in Creation and art can enable an encounter with divine Wisdom; William T. Cavanaugh, on why Christians should think about economics theologically, not just as a science or an ethical discipline; Philip Turner, on why Christian ethics has the health of the Church at its center, not just personal obedience or social justice; Gisela Kreglinger, on wine, the culture of wine, and the superabundant goodness of God made manifest in the gift of wine.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 133

Guests on Volume 133: Darío Fernández-Morera, on the real history of Islamic Spain in the Middle Ages; Francis Oakley, on the enduring belief in sacral kingship and the secularization of politics in the late Middle Ages; Oliver O'Donovan, on why all political authority can only be properly understood by way of analogy with God’s kingship; Thomas Storck, on the conflicts between “Americanism” and Catholic social teaching; John Safranek, on the self-contradictory character of modern liberalism; Brian Brock, on the challenges and opportunities of being a “Church theologian” in a secular university; George Marsden, on the birth and influential life of C. S. Lewis’s Mere Christianity.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 132

Guests on Volume 132: David I. Smith, on how metaphors assumed by teachers lead them to imagine the vocation of teaching; Susan Felch, on how the metaphors of gardens, building, and feasting can inform the task of education; D. C. Schindler, on philosopher Robert Spaemann's understanding of a teleological nature; Malcolm Guite, on his seven sonnets based on the ancient “O Antiphons” sung traditionally during Advent; J. A. C. Redford, on setting Malcolm Guite’s “O Antiphon” sonnets to music

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 131

Guests on Volume 131: John Durham Peters, on understanding media as agencies of order, not just devices of information; Paul Heintzman, on how a biblical understanding of human spirituality can inform our concept of “leisure”; Richard Lints, on how the image of God and idolatry are inversely related; Peter Harrison, on how our current definition of “science” and “religion” represents novel conceptual categories; Francis J. Beckwith, on the widespread tendency to erect a wall between faith and reason; David L. Schindler & Nicholas J. Healy, Jr., on how the First Amendment is not as sympathetic to religious freedom as is commonly believed.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 130

Guests on Volume 130: Jacob Silverman, on the hidden costs of social media; Carson Holloway, on the neglected role of religious revelation within political science; Joseph Atkinson, on the sacramental and ontological foundations of marriage and family; Greg Peters, on the value of retrieving the theology and practices of Christian monasticism; Antonio López, on human nature and freedom in a technological culture; and Julian Johnson, on how Western music expresses the spirit of modernity.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 129

Guests on Volume 129: Nicholas Carr, on how automation technologies make our lives easier — while detaching us from the practices of engaging the world that are most fulfilling for us; Robert Pogue Harrison, on the challenges of nurturing the inner lives and loves of our children to enable them to receive the legacies of our culture; R. J. Snell, on how the vice of acedia denies the being of Creation; Norman Wirzba, on how a Scriptural imagination allows us to perceive the world as Creation (not just as nature); Philip Zaleski and Carol Zaleski, on how the Inklings were critical of modernity in the interest of restoring Western culture to its Christian roots; and Peter Phillips, on the “tintinnabuli” style of composition in the works of Arvo Pärt.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 128

Guests on Volume 128: Matthew Crawford, on how skillful engagement with the material world provides the setting for true individuality; Carlo Lancellotti, on Augusto Del Noce's critique of modernity; James Turner, on the origins of the humanities in the venerable discipline of philology; Rod Dreher, on what he learned from Dante’s Divine Comedy; Mark Evan Bonds, on the idea of "absolute music"; and Jeremy Beer, on the neglected accomplishments of Booth Tarkington.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 127

Guests on Volume 127: Christopher Shannon, on the historian's communal role as story-teller; Kevin Vanhoozer, on the dramatic purposes of doctrine; Oliver O'Donovan, on negotiating our way in the created realities; Rebecca DeYoung, on the forgotten vice of vainglory; Thomas Forrest Kelly, on the invention of Western musical notation; and Calvin Stapert, on the life and work of Joseph Haydn.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 126

Guests on Volume 126: James W. Skillen, on how all human cultural activity, including politics, should be understood in the context of God’s good purposes for Creation; Christian Smith, on how American sociology is not (as is claimed) a disinterested scientific endeavor but the pursuit of a sacred project driven by sacred commitments; B. W. Powe, on the unique “apocalyptic” insights of Marshall McLuhan and Northrop Frye; David Downing, on C. S. Lewis’s The Pilgrim’s Regress; Roger Scruton, on the inability for materialism to give a satisfactory account of our experience of the material world; and Jonathan Arnold, on the curious place of sacred music in a secular society.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 125

Guests on Volume 125: Brent Hull, on the virtues of craftsmanship; David Koyzis, on the goodness and nature of authority; Steve Wilkens, on three Christian views of the relationship between faith and reason; Roger Lundin, on faith and doubt in an inescapably verbal universe; Craig Bernthal, on the Christian doctrine of Creation in Tolkien’s mythic writings; and Kerry McCarthy, on the life and legacy of English Renaissance composer William Byrd.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 124

Guests on Volume 124: John Fea, on how American individualism fuels indifference to the study of history, and how K-12 education can counter that apathy; Robert F. Rea, on how engagement with Church history deepens our faith and enriches our capacity as faithful servants; John C. Pinheiro, on how anti-Catholic prejudice in mid-nineteenth-century America was intertwined with beliefs about the virtues of Republicanism, "Manifest Destiny," and the Mexican-American War; R. J. Snell, on how newer ideas about natural law focus less on moral propositions and concepts and more on the thrust for meaning and value; Duncan G. Stroik, on how architectural styles function as languages that speak to us and enable buildings to speak to each other; Kate Tamarkin and Fiona Hughes, on the healing power of music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 123

Guests on Volume 123: Nicholas M. Healy, on some of the practical and theological weaknesses in the writings of Stanley Hauerwas; Christian Smith, on the spiritual lives of emerging adults raised within the Roman Catholic Church and taught at Catholic schools; James K. A. Smith, on Charles Taylor's explanation (in The Secular Age) of how modern culture came to unlearn the theistic assumption of the West; Esther Lightcap Meek, on why pitting "objectivity" against "subjectivity" in describing the nature of knowledge isn't helpful, and on why all knowing involves making a commitment; Richard Viladesau, on the relationship between formal, propositional, academic theology and the theological expressions found in works of art and music; and Jeremy Begbie, on why theologians should be more interested in how music and modernity have interacted.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 122

Guests on Volume 122: N. T. Wright, on the significance of narrative awareness as a gesture towards participating in God's on-going narrative and away from cultural captivity; George Marsden, on American public intellectuals of the 1950s and their anxieties concerning national purpose; Makoto Fujimura, on modernist art, Jacques Maritain, and the Eastern pictorial tradition; David Bentley Hart, on why historic theism (and all of its metaphysical claims) explains reality better than materialism does; and Thomas Lessl, on the institutional "Copernican revolution" of the university and its attending warfare mythology as enduring perpetuators of the war between science and religion.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 121

Guests on Volume 121: Daniel Gabelman, on how George MacDonald’s celebration of the “childlike” promotes levity and a joyful sense of play, rooted in filial trust of the Father; Curtis White,on the troubling enthusiasm for accounts of the human person that reduce us to mere meat and wetware; Michael Hanby, on why there is no “neutral” science, how all accounts of what science does and why contain metaphysical and theological assumptions; Alan Jacobs, on why the Book of Common Prayer has lived such a long and influential life; James K. A. Smith, on how some movements in modern philosophy provide resources for recovering an appreciation for the role of the body in knowing the world; and Bruce Herman and Walter Hansen, on Herman’s paintings and how conversing about works of art enables us to grow in understanding of the non-verbal meaning they convey.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 120

Guests on Volume 120: Douglas Rushkoff, on the experience of “present shock” and the consequent loss of belief in the capability of stories to convey the shape of reality to us; Phillip Thompson, on Thomas Merton's lifelong concern about the disorienting effects of the technological mindset; Jonathan Wilson, on how the life of the Trinity—a life of interpersonal giving and receiving—is the model of life within Creation, calling us to lives of generosity; James Bratt, on the life and thought of Abraham Kuyper, and on some of his early influences; D. C. Schindler, on how consciousness and reason are “ecstatic,” and necessarily involve reaching outside of ourselves; and Paul Elie, on how access to recordings enables a deeper understanding of music, and how the experience of Bach's music benefits from such depth.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 119

Guests on Volume 119: Mary Eberstadt, on how the decline of formation of natural families has made Christian belief less plausible and contributed to the secularization of Europe; Allan Bevere, on why the claim by “empire criticism” that the letter to the Colossians is a veiled repudiation of Roman imperial hubris is mistaken; Peter J. Leithart, on how the Bible evaluates empires in light of their relationship with the people of God; Steven Boyer, on why “mystery” is a necessary category in Christian theology; Karen Dieleman, on how different liturgical practices of Victorian congregationalism, Anglo-Catholicism, and Roman Catholicism influenced the poetry of Elizabeth Barret Browning, Christina Rossetti, and Adelaide Proctor; and Peter Phillips, on the founding of The Tallis Scholars and the peculiar beauty of Renaissance polyphony.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 118

Guests on Volume 118: Gilbert Meilaender, on the ethical questions raised by anti-aging research, especially its most extreme forms in the "transhumanist" movement; Ron Highfield, on why the modern assumptions about personal identity, freedom, and human dignity create prejudices against the Gospel's account of God and the self; Mark Mitchell, on why gratitude and stewardship should be seen as fundamental political postures; Daniel M. Bell, Jr., on how capitalism nurtures the assumption of the autonomous self; Helen Rhee, on the centrality of almsgiving to Christian identity in the early Church; and Peter Brown, on how the early Church's wrestling with the questions of wealth and poverty steered a course between radical asceticism and careless indulgence.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 117

Guests on Volume 117: Matthew Dickerson, on the likenesses between Beowulf and three of Tolkien’s heroes, and on how (despite Peter Jackson’s rendition) The Lord of the Rings is more interested in virtue than in military exploits; Jennifer Woodruff Tait, on how assumptions about the nature of moral knowledge—derived from the school of common-sense realism—compelled Victorian Methodists and others to substitute grape juice for wine in celebrating the Lord’s Supper; Jeffry Davis and Philip Ryken, on why the liberal arts ought to be recognized as a calling that enriches Christian living; and Robert George, on the consequences of redefining marriage.

Free Demo Issue

Please stream or download our free demo issue — a representative selection of past interviews — to get a sense of what it’s like to subscribe.

If you wish to receive or to send a free Demo CD to a friend, email us at soundthinking@marshillaudio.org or call toll-free at 1.800.331.6407.

Primer

What is the Church's interest in culture?

Ken Myers, host of the MARS HILL AUDIO Journal, shares his thoughts on some of the basic issues the Journal seeks to address. Click Subscribe above to order a subscription to the Journal!

Primer

What is distinctive about modern culture?

Ken Myers, host of the MARS HILL AUDIO Journal, shares his thoughts on some of the basic issues the Journal seeks to address. Click Subscribe above to order a subscription to the Journal!

Primer

What is culture?

Ken Myers, host of the MARS HILL AUDIO Journal, shares his thoughts on some of the basic issues the Journal seeks to address. Click Subscribe above to order a subscription to the Journal!

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 116

Guests on Volume 116: Stratford Caldecott, on why education should be designed with a deep and wide understanding of human nature and must sustain the unity of knowledge; Fred Bahnson, on how a Christian understanding of God's redemptive work on the earth should influence our practices of growing and sharing food; Eric O. Jacobsen, on how modernism distorted the shape of cities and how Christian reflection on the nature of neighborliness can help restore them; J. Budziszewski, on how meaning in human life transcends a merely biological explanation of our behavior; Brian Brock, on the various ways in which the Church has regarded its obligation to welcome the disabled; and Allen Verhey, on the difference between a "medicalized" death and a death experienced in light of God's cosmic work of redemption.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 115

Guests on Volume 115: Arlie Russell Hochschild, on how the reliance in personal life on professional consultants establishes market-shaped models for imagining personal identity; Andrew Davison, on why a fully Christian approach to apologetics requires a Christian understanding of reason; Adrian Pabst, on why only a Christian understanding of God and Creation can provide the ground for understanding the order of reality; Gary Colledge, on the centrality of Christian belief to the writings and social concerns of Charles Dickens; Linda Lewis, on how Charles Dickens assumed in his readers a basic Biblical literacy, and so constructed his stories in a sort of conversation with the teaching of Jesus; and Thomas Bergler, on how the Church's captivity to youth culture eclipses concern for (or even a belief in the possibility of) Christian maturity.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 114

Guests on Volume 114: Susan Cain, on how the 20th-century displacement of character by "personality" encouraged Americans to sell themselves (and marginalize introverts); Brad S. Gregory, on the danger of assuming that previous epochs of history have no lasting influence, and how unintended consequences of the Reformation shrunk Christian cultural influence; David Sehat, on why the story of religious liberty in America is more complicated than is often acknowledged; Augustine Thompson, O.P., on the myths and realities of St. Francis of Assisi; Gerald R. McDermott, on how love and beauty are more fundamental in the thought of Jonathan Edwards than the image of an angry God; and Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, on lessons in The Scarlet Letter about wise ways of reading complex texts.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 113

Guests on Volume 113: Steven Shapin, on whether or not there is a single thing called "science," and whether scientists are united by a single "scientific method"; Arthur Boers, on why the ways in which technologies shape our lives should be recognized as spiritual and pastoral challenges; Christine Pohl, on why a deliberate commitment to certain shared practices is necessary for the sustaining of community; Norman Wirzba, on how attentiveness to our eating and our care of the land are central aspects of culture and of godly faith; Craig Bartholomew, on carelessness concerning embodied experience and our "crisis of place"; and David I. Smith, on how the forms of pedagogical practices ought to be crafted to correspond to the content of teaching.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 112

Guests on Volume 112: Christian Smith, on why "emerging adults" feel compelled to keep all their options open, in life and in thought; David L. Schindler, on how modern liberalism fails to acknowledge the reality of God's love in the order of Creation; Sara Anson Vaux, on the moral vision of director Clint Eastwood; Melvyn Bragg, on the origins and profound cultural influence of the King James Bible; Timothy Larsen, on how Victorians were united in their preoccupation with the Bible, whether or not they believed in God; and Ralph C. Wood, on the sacramental vision of G. K. Chesterton, and on the enigmatic message of The Man Who Was Thursday.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 111

Guests on Volume 111: Siva Vaidhyanathan, on why trusting Google to organize the world's knowledge is an odd (and dangerous) thing to do; John Fea, on the history of the idea of America as a Christian nation and on how the Founders were—as statesmen—less interested in the truth of religion than in its political utility; Ross Douthat, on how commitment to historical Christian orthodoxy has eroded among American religious institutions since the 1960s; Ian Ker, on why G. K. Chesterton deserves wider recognition as a significant literary critic; Larry Woiwode, on how his decision to become a writer grew out of a desire to make connections with other people; and Dana Gioia, on the remarkable life of poet John Donne and how his spiritual and intellectual struggles created the conditions for his unique poetic voice.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 110

Guests on Volume 110: Kevin Belmonte, on how G. K. Chesterton embraced a "defiant joy" in spite of the cynical pessimism of many of his contemporaries; David Lyle Jeffrey and Gregory Maillet, on why Christians cannot afford to regard literature as a mere entertaining diversion; Mark Noll, on what motivates anti-intellectualism among Christians and why it is a theologically indefensible prejudice; Alan Jacobs, on W. H. Auden's understanding of the vocation of "poet" and on the spiritual and historical background to Auden's 1947 book-length poem, The Age of Anxiety; and Jonathan Chaplin, on the outlines and sources of the social and political thought of Herman Dooyeweerd and on his understanding of the relationship between theology and Christian philosophy.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 109

Guests on Volume 109: Douglas Coupland, on the strange and wonderful life and thought of media guru Marshall McLuhan; Charles Mathewes, on lessons from Augustine on thinking about our political lives in theological terms; William T. Cavanaugh, on how the modern state is a unique kind of political entity, inviting a new kind of idolatry; William Dyrness, on the challenges of developing a positive theology of desire and the imagination; Steven Guthrie, on relating the Spirit's work in making us human to what happens in art and human creativity; and Susannah Clements, on the changing view of evil evident in the evolution of vampires from Bram Stoker to Sookie Stackhouse.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 108

Guests on Volume 108: Thomas Albert Howard, on why many nineteenth-century Europeans were nervous about the shape of American religious life; Jean Porter, on how natural law provides a rationale for the rule of law and for legislative and judicial authority; Peter Augustine Lawler, on how neither ancient philosophy nor modern science explains human nature (but the Logos does); Hans Boersma, on why Christians should reject the modern separation of Heaven and Earth and recover a "sacramental ontology"; Felicia Wu Song, on how online communication systems shape relationships and community; and Elias Aboujaoude, on how life online makes us think we’re bigger, badder, and smarter than we really are.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 107

Guests on Volume 107: Victor Lee Austin, on why authority is not a barrier to true freedom and is necessary for human flourishing (and will be forever); Ellen T. Charry, on why happiness has been underplayed in Christian theology (and why it shouldn't be); Anthony Esolen, on the explicit and implicit teaching that has caused many young people to be cynical and unhappy; Ferdinand Schlingensiepen, on the ambivalence of postwar Germans to the anti-Nazi resistance movement (and to Dietrich Bonhoeffer); Allen Verhey, on why it's dangerous to draw too stark a line between nature and supernature; and Calvin Stapert, on the historical, theological, and musical elements that combined to produce Handel's Messiah.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 106

Guests on Volume 106: Adam Briggle, on how Leon Kass's leadership of the President's Council on Bioethics attempted to reframe public thinking about ethical matters; John C. Médaille, on why economics should be concerned with ethical matters from the bottom up; Christopher Page, on how the presence of choral music in the Church shaped the rise of the West; Christian Smith, on why sociologists need a richer understanding of human nature and human personhood and should recognize "love" as an essential human attribute; Herman Daly, on why he and Wendell Berry are disturbed by the lack of attention paid by classical economics to the realities of the material world; and Thomas Hibbs, on the dark nihilism in the films of Woody Allen.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 105

Guests on Volume 105: Julian Young, on the historical context of Friedrich Nietzsche's ideas and on why he still believed in the necessity of religion; Perry L. Glanzer, on the failure of American universities to adequately address the challenge of moral formation; Kenda Creasy Dean, on why churches are to blame for the "moralistic therapeutic Deism" so common among teens; Brian Brock, on how the centrality of technology in Western culture encourages us to see the gift of Creation as merely "nature" awaiting our manipulation; Nicholas Carr, on how the distracted character of multi-tasking ruins reading and how social networking systems sustain a "transactional" view of relationships; and Alan Jacobs, on how the literary form of the essay reproduces the unpredictable way that our thoughts develop.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 104

Guests on Volume 104: James Le Fanu, on the mistaken assumption that modern medical science has eliminated the fittingness of a sense of mystery and wonder at the human mind and body; Garret Keizer, on how many noises in modern life reveal a state of warfare with the limitations of our embodiment; Daniel Ritchie, on how Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) and Isaac Watts (1674-1748) anticipated late twentieth-century critiques of the Enlightenment; Monica Ganas, on how the distinct vision of life embedded in "California-ism" has exerted a powerful cultural influence; Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove, on how the search for faithfulness to Christ led him to the wisdom of the Benedictine Rule and a "new monasticism"; and Peter J. Leithart, on why Constantine has an unfairly bad reputation and on how his rule dealt a severe blow to paganism in the West.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 103

Guests on Volume 103: Steven D. Smith, on how the law only makes sense in the context of certain metaphysical beliefs, and on why we aren't allowed to talk about such things in public; David Thomson, on the American Dream, acting, loneliness, the moral complicity of movie audiences, and the genius of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho; Adam McHugh, on how American culture distrusts introverts and on why their place in the Church needs to be valued; Glenn C. Arbery, on the Vanderbilt Agrarians, poetry, and the moral imagination and the shaping of virtue; Eric Miller, on Christopher Lasch's intense commitment to understand the logic of American cultural confusion; and Eric Metaxas, on how Dietrich Bonhoeffer's early experiences prepared him for his heroic defiance of the Third Reich.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 102

Guests on Volume 102: Daniel M. Bell, Jr., on recovering the view that the just war tradition is more about the shaping of character and virtue than a checklist for political leaders; Lew Daly, on how the discussion concerning faith-based initiatives raised larger issues about the identity of social groups in American society; Adam K. Webb, on whether the traditional personal and communal virtues in premodern village life must be abandoned for poverty to be alleviated; Stratford Caldecott, on how denying the reality of beauty is linked to a denial of the coherent meaning of Creation; James Matthew Wilson, on Jacques Maritain's pilgrimage to faith and his subsequent development of a rich philosophy of beauty; and Thomas Hibbs, on the similar projects of painters Georges Rouault (1871-1958) and Makoto Fujimura (b. 1960), and how they each resisted various confusions in modern art.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 101

Guests on Volume 101: James Davison Hunter, on how the most prominent strategies of Christian cultural engagement are based on a misunderstanding about how cultures work; Paul Spears, on why Christian scholars need to understand their disciplines in ways that depart from conventional understanding; Steven Loomis, on why education needs to attend more carefully to nonquantifiable aspects of human experience; James K. A. Smith, on how education always involves the formation of affections and how the form of Christian education should imitate patterns of formation evident in historic Christian liturgy; Thomas Long, on how funeral practices have the capacity to convey an understanding of the meaning of discipleship and death; and William T. Cavanaugh, on the distinctly modern definition of "religion" and how the conventional account of the "Wars of Religion" misrepresents the facts in the interest of consolidating state power.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 100

Guests on Volume 100: Jennifer Burns, on the life and legacy of Ayn Rand, "goddess of the market" and entrenched enemy of altruism; Christian Smith, on the aimless cultural world of "emerging adulthood" and on how it makes the idea of objective moral order implausible; and Dallas Willard, on why it's important to recover the conviction that religious beliefs involve real knowledge. In honor of the five score milestone, part two of the issue features a look back at the beginnings of the Journal and a few special excerpts of conversations with those early guests, including Peter Kreeft on Lewis, Huxley, and J.F.K. after death; P. D. James, on good and evil in fiction; James Davison Hunter, on culture wars; Paul McHugh, on when psychiatry loses its way; Ted Prescott, on nudity in art and advertising; Ed Knippers, on the powerful presence of the body; Martha Bayles, on pop and perverse modernism; Dominic Aquila, on Christopher Lasch; Gilbert Meilaender, on random kindness; Neil Postman, on technology and culture; and Alan Jacobs, on being maudlin in Madison County.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 99

Guests on Volume 99: Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, on how the abuse of language creates distrust in the power of words and on how we can be better stewards of the gift of language; Paul A. Rahe, on the heresy of progressivism, which abandons vital convictions about human nature and political order and invites the advent of "soft despotism"; James L. Nolan, Jr., on how European countries have adopted the American model of "problem-solving courts" (and what they also get in the bargain); Andrew J. Cherlin, on why the twin American commitments to marriage and to expressive individualism hurt families; Dale Kuehne, on the faulty assumption that intimate relationships demand sexual involvement, and on how the essentially relational nature of the Gospel is ignored; and Alison Milbank on how the fantasy writings of G. K. Chesterton and J. R. R. Tolkien are intended to reconnect readers with reality.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 98

Guests on Volume 98: Stanley Hauerwas, on the public witness of Fr. Richard John Neuhaus and on why Neuhaus abandoned his 1960s radicalism to become a leading "theoconservative"; Clarke Forsythe, on why prudence is a lost political virtue and on why and how the pro-life movement needs to broaden its educational efforts; Gilbert Meilaender, on the necessity of a concept of human dignity and on why Americans no longer seem able to defend it; Jeanne Murray Walker, on how her students learn to understand poetry and on how metaphors are at the heart of poetic expression; Roger Lundin, on how the disenchantment of the world led to new forms of doubt and self-expression; and David Bentley Hart, on the feeble and confused arguments of the recent crop of outspoken atheists and on how a misunderstanding of the nature of freedom is at the heart of their revulsion at religion.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 97

Guests on Volume 97: Mark Noll, on how Christian higher education is aided by a commitment to something like "Christendom," a commitment to the assumption that the Gospel has consequences for all of life and all of social experience; Stanley Fish, on how university professors should refrain from bringing their own political, philosophical, and religious commitments into the classroom; James Peters, on how Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Pascal, and many others had an understanding of the nature and purpose of reason quite different from the common modern understanding; Scott Moore, on cultivating an understanding of politics that goes beyond mere statecraft, and on the limits of the notion of "rights"; and Makoto Fujimura, on how his work as a painter is enriched by writing, why artists need to cultivate an attentiveness to many things, and how visual language expresses experience.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 96

Guests on Volume 96: David A. Smith, on the beginnings of the National Endowment for the Arts and the capacity of the arts in a democracy for combatting atomistic individualism; Kiku Adatto, on how images, words, and ideas interact in a visually saturated culture and on how the image of a person's face in a photograph has the capacity for intimate representation of inner personhood; Elvin T. Lim, on how presidential speeches have been dumbed down for decades and why presidents like it; David Naugle, on the deeper meaning of happiness, the disordering effects of sin, and the reordering of love made possible in our redemption; Richard Stivers, on the technologizing of all of life; and John Betz, on the critique of the Enlightenment offered by Johann Georg Hamann (1730-1788), and why it still matters to us.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 95

Guests on Volume 95: Stewart Davenport, on how nineteenth-century Christians separated the moral and practical aspects of economic life; William T. Cavanaugh, on how theology and economics are necessarily intertwined and on how a larger understanding of the meaning of "freedom" would change our economic actions; J. Matthew Bonzo & Michael R. Stevens, on Wendell Berry's concern for the dislocating and fragmenting forces in modern life; Craig Gay, on how language—specifically the spoken word—is central to our human experience; Eugene Peterson, on how Jesus' use of ambiguous language encouraged active spiritual engagement; and Barry Hankins, on how the late Francis Schaeffer moved from being a defensive fundamentalist to a prophet of cultural engagement.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 94

Guests on Volume 94: Maggie Jackson, on how multitasking exalts efficiency and promises the overcoming of bodily limitations as time is restructured and on the importance of attentiveness in sustaining personal and social order; Mark Bauerlein, on how technologies have rearranged the social lives of teens (and their expectations of education); Tim Clydesdale, on what the first year in college means for teens; Andy Crouch, on the physical basis of cultural life and how "culture making" is done; and Jeremy Begbie, on how music is a way of engaging with the order in Creation and on how writing and hearing music involves a recognition of likenesses in Creation and the exercise of "hyper-hearing."

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 93

Guests on Volume 93: Alan Jacobs, on practical consequences of belief in original sin (and the five distinct components of that belief); James A. Herrick, on redemptive myths advanced by science fiction and speculative science and on evolution as a religion; J. Daryl Charles, on the commitment by the magisterial Reformers to the idea of natural law; Robert C. Roberts, on the role of emotions in ethical and spiritual life; Allan C. Carlson, on how the industrial revolution changed the shape of households (including their floorplans) and the understanding of marriage; and Sheila O'Connor-Ambrose, on the work of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese in defending marriage against the various claims of individualism.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 92

Guests on Volume 92: Jake Halpern, on the ecosystem of celebrity and the complicated reasons why people seek to become famous; Stephen J. Nichols, on how the dynamics of American culture have shaped our understanding of who Jesus is; Richard M. Gamble, on resources for and the outlines of a theology of education; Peter J. Leithart, on how concerns from some postmodern thinkers echo the eschatological perspective of Solomon (as presented in the book of Ecclesiastes); Bill Vitek, on how wise living on the Earth requires the humble recognition of our ignorance as well as the application of knowledge; and Craig Holdrege, on lessons from Goethe about how we understand the rest of Creation as participants, not detached and potentially omniscient observers, and also on the "conversational" quality of our engagement with Creation.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 91

Guests on Volume 91: John Witte, Jr., on the life and work of legal historian Harold Berman and on the revolutionary changes throughout the history of law in the West; Hugh Brogan, on Alexis de Tocqueville’s understanding of democracy, equality, liberty, free association, social status, and the dangers of centralized government; Daniel Ritchie, on Tocqueville’s analysis of the dangers of individualism (and how they might be avoided); Daniel Walker Howe, on the confidence in progress and Providence in early 19th-century America; George McKenna, on how the Puritan understanding of God’s purposes in history shaped American political culture; and Patrick Deneen, on the differences between Aristotelian and modern political philosophy and on how Wendell Berry’s thought demonstrates his identity as a "Kentucky Aristotelian."

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 90

Guests on Volume 90: J. Mark Bertrand, on how the language of "worldviews" can mean something richer than it often does; Michael P. Schutt, on how the day-to-day practice of Christian lawyers can reflect a Christian view of the nature of law; Michael Ward, on how C. S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia were shaped by medieval cosmological beliefs about the seven planets; Dana Gioia, on the disturbing trends in the reading (non)habits of Americans; Makoto Fujimura, on reading, painting, and attending to the world; Gregory Edward Reynolds, on lessons about reading from the study of media ecology; Catherine Prescott, on why portrait painters often depict their subjects with books in their hands; and Eugene Peterson, on the place of reading in the spiritual lives of Christians.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 89

Guests on Volume 89: Thomas Hibbs, on the theme of the possibility of redemption in film noir and similar film genres; Barrett Fisher, on the films of screenwriter Charlie Kaufman; Fred Turner, on 1960s dreams of countercultural change and the rise of the Whole Earth Catalog; Dan Blazer, on why psychiatric disorders require attention to the story of patients’ lives; Christopher Lane, on the complex characteristics of anxiety and the tendency to treat the absence of ease with drugs; and Jerome C. Wakefield, on how psychiatry began ignoring causes of mental suffering and so defined sadness as a disease.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 88

Guests on Volume 88: Michael J. Lewis, on Body Worlds, human nature and Western Art; Diana Pavlac Glyer, on the influence of the Inklings on each others’ writings; Steve Talbott, on how the aims of education are distracted by technology; Darryl Tippens, on why we sing; Everett Ferguson, on the place of music in the Early Church; Alexander Lingas, on the tradition of music in the Eastern churches; and Calvin Stapert, on the nature of meaning in music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 87

Guests on Volume 87: John Witte, Jr., on law and religion in the Western tradition; Steven Keillor, on God’s judgments and history; Philip Bess, on New Urbanism and natural law; Scott Cairns, on words and poetry’s work; and Anthony Esolen, on literary critics and Christian belief.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 86

Guests on Volume 86: Roger Lundin on why, after Vietnam, American literary critics forgot about American religion; Lawrence Buell, on diverse visions of America and Nature; Harold K. Bush, Jr., on the glorification of the American way as a civil religion; Roger Lundin, on the transformation of the nature of belief in the late 19th century; Katherine Shaw Spaht, on radical autonomy, marriage, divorce, and law; Steven L. Nock, on how broadly shared cultural assumptions affect laws regulating marriage and divorce; Norman Klassen & Jens Zimmermann, on the Incarnation and humanism, and on how various dualisms affect our assumptions about faith, knowledge, and higher education.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 85

Guests on Volume 85: C. John Sommerville, on how higher education, divorced from higher realities, has become socially irrelevant; Catherine Albanese, on American "metaphysical religion," varieties of gnosticism, and the quest for spiritual energy; Christopher Shannon, on how social scientists encouraged the rise of autonomous individualism in 20th-century America; Michael G. Lawler, on the development of the idea of marriage as covenant in Roman Catholic thought; Gilbert Meilaender, on lessons from Augustine in defining proper expectations for the Christian life; Matthew Dickerson, on J. R. R. Tolkien's vision of stewardship of the earth: the glory of trees and the shepherdhood of ents.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 84

Guests on Volume 84: Harry R. Lewis, on higher education's amnesia about its purposes, and how that shortchanges students; Nicholas Wolterstorff, on Abraham Kuyper (1837-1927), the French Revolution, worldviews, and "sphere sovereignty"; Brendan Sweetman, on why religious worldviews should not be excluded from political life; James Turner Johnson, on the development of Christian thought about the meaning of marriage; David Martin, on how the 1960s replayed themes of the 1890s and 1930s; and Edward Ericson, Jr., on Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's beginnings and legacy.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 83

Guests on Volume 83: Barrett Fisher, on film noir and its revealing portrayal of human moral confusion; Dick Keyes, on contemporary cynicism, how it's destructive, and how it might be resisted; Richard Lints, on a distinctively theological approach to understanding human identity; Paul McHugh, on how the discipline of psychiatry needs to mature, and on "stories" as diagnostic tools; Paul Weston, on lessons from Lesslie Newbigin on interfaith dialogue and the attacks on Christianity from scientism; and Paul Walker, on how the forms of Renaissance choral music communicate rich theological concerns.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 82

Guests on Volume 82: Stephen Gardner on how modern culture weakens religion and establishes a new definition of the public; Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn on Tom Wolfe and Philip Rieff's diagnosis of cultural disorder; Wilfred McClay on how Philip Rieff's brilliant critique of modern disorder kept him from realizing a way out of our dilemma; David Wells on how Western culture has eclipsed fundamental assumptions about human nature and God; James K. A. Smith on the postmodern insight that our experience in the world requires interpretation (and that some interpretations are better than others); and Robert Littlejohn on how education should encourage wisdom and eloquence in students.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 81

Guests on Volume 81: Nigel Cameron on the lack of ethical reflection in public policy on technology; Joel James Shuman on beliefs about God's nature and purposes informing how we think about sickness and medicine; Brian Volck on embodied life, stories, and how medical practice involves attending to the stories of the bodies of patients; Russell Hittinger on the modern state giving rise to modern Catholic social thought; Mark Noll on learning to think about law and politics from earlier Christians who lived in very different political circumstances; and Stephen Miller on the factors that sustain the art of conversation, and why it's a dying art.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 80

Guests on Volume 80: Stephen A. McKnight on The Religious Foundations of Francis Bacon's Thought; Tim Morris & Don Petcher on science, Christology, and why segregating nature from supernature doesn't do justice to either; Vigen Guroian on the mystical character of fragrance and on why working in his garden is an imitation of the Master Gardener; Paul Valliere on Orthodox theology's engagement with questions concerning law, politics, and human nature, and on the ideas of Vladimir Soloviev (1853-1900); Vigen Guroian on the importance of personality and community in the thought of Nicholas Berdyaev (1874-1948); and Calvin Stapert on the affirmation of Creation and intimations of transcendence in the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 79

Guests on Volume 79: Carson Holloway on why sociobiology and evolutionary psychology are inadequate bases for sustaining political ideals; Peter Augustine Lawler on why we are more than "individuals" narrowly defined; Hadley Arkes on the difference, in law, between evidence from social scientific data and moral truths; Ben Witherington, III on why The Da Vinci Code's implausible account of history seems credible to many people; Christopher Shannon on Ivan Illich (Medical Nemesis) and the loss of belief in the possibility that suffering can be meaningful; Roger Lundin on how nature and experience replaced revelation as a source of authority (and why they fail to serve as such), and on the necessity of humility in writing biographies.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 78

Guests on Volume 78: Mark Bauerlein on the causes of disengagement of college students from concern for intellectual and civic life; Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn on television, children, and acquiring a sense of reality; Sam Van Eman on the view of the good life advanced by advertising; Thomas de Zengotita on Mediated: How the Media Shapes Your World and the Way You Live in It, and on postmodern individualism and "reality" TV; Eugene McCarraher on how American management theory became an influential source of religious meaning and practice; and John Witte, Jr. on how law embodies a view of human nature, and why religious viewpoints have often been ignored.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 77

Guests on Volume 77: Eric Miller on the conserving radicalism and revolutionary traditionalism of Christopher Lasch; Lisa de Boer on the depiction of everyday humanity in northern European post-Renaissance painting; Peter J. Schakel on seeing The Chronicles of Narnia as fairy tales, not just Christian allegory; and Alan Jacobs on how The Chronicles of Narnia reveal much of C. S. Lewis's thinking on almost everything, and on how Lewis's imagination was prepared to write such books.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 76

Guests on Volume 76: D. H. Williams on the Church's rootedness in its Tradition, why some Protestants remain suspicious, and on the excluding character of Christian conversion; Catherine Edwards Sanders on the spiritual hunger behind the rise of modern witchcraft; Ted Prescott on changing images of beauty and the human figure in 20th century art; Martin X. Moleski on the life, times, and remarkable insights of Michael Polanyi; Stephen Prickett on George MacDonald and the tasks of imagination; and Barrett Fisher on the relative artistic assets of film and literature.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 75

Guests on Volume 75: Mark Malvasi, on John Lukacs, the meaning of the modern, and how to think about history; John Lukacs, on the roles of curiosity and language in the vocation of historians; Steve Talbott, on how communications technologies divert language from its richest possibilities; Christian Smith, on the spiritual lives and theological assumptions of American teenagers; Eugene Peterson, on the essential relationship between theology and spirituality, and on the narrative life of congregations; and Rolland Hein, on the life and imagination of George MacDonald.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 74

Guests on Volume 74: Russell Moore, on the struggles at Baylor University, "soul competency," and the Baptist culture of autonomy; W. Bradford Wilcox, on the characteristics of "soft patriarchy" in evangelical families; Joseph E. Davis, on sexual abuse, how it is explained, and how a sense of identity is thereby formed; Barrett Fisher, on the remarkable achievement of film producer Ismail Merchant; Jeanne Murray Walker and Darryl Tippens, on overcoming the neglect of literature that highlights the spiritual dimension of human experience; and Paul Walker, on the life and music of English organist and composer Thomas Tallis, 1505-1585.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 73

Guests on Volume 73: Richard John Neuhaus, Nigel Cameron, Carlos F. Gomez, and Michael Uhlmann, on the meaning and value of human life, the vocation of medicine, the logic of autonomous individualism, and the temptation of suicide and euthanasia; Patrick Carey, on the perceptive (and peregrinating) thought of Orestes Brownson; John W. O'Malley, on the prophetic, academic, humanistic, and artistic vectors of Western culture; Patricia Owen, on what makes good children's books and on how the Newbery Medal winners have changed over time; Susan Srigley, on the sacramental and incarnational fiction of Flannery O'Connor; and Ralph C. Wood, on Flannery O'Connor as "hill-billy Thomist" and sympathizer with backwoods religion.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 72

Guests on Volume 72: John Polkinghorne, on lessons for theology learned from the inductive nature of the work of science; Francesca Aran Murphy, on the efforts of 20th-century Catholic and French philosopher Étienne Gilson to reconcile faith and reason; James Hitchcock, on the history of the Supreme Court's decisions regarding religious practice and liberty; Wilfred McClay, on Nathaniel Hawthorne's vision of the intractability of human failings and the possibilities of the American experiment, and on the theme of place and communal obligation in Nathaniel Hawthorne's writing; Philip McFarland, on how Hawthorne's sensitivity to the darker side of human nature makes him perennially instructive; and David Hackett Fischer, on the history of how Americans have understood and symbolized freedom and liberty.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 71

Guests on Volume 71: Peter Augustine Lawler, on Luther, Locke, liberty, and the American Founding Fathers; David Koyzis, on the modern denial of objective meaning and the exaltation of individual will; Roger Lundin, on the incarnational vision of Czeslaw Milosz, and on his poetry of exile and modern boundlessness; Craig Gay, on how the nature of money affects our sense of attributing value to things; Steven Rhoads, on Taking Sex Differences Seriously (and why it's hard to do so); and R. Larry Todd, on the life and music of Felix Mendelssohn.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 70

Guests on Volume 70: W. Wesley McDonald, on the significance of Russell Kirk’s themes of the "permanent things" and "the moral imagination"; C. Ben Mitchell, on law, wisdom, and the possibilities of pastoral guidance on bioethical decisions, and on why and how the Church should be more welcoming toward the elderly; Carl Elliott, on the medical industry’s move from healing to enhancing self-esteem and idenity formation; Richard Weikart, on the rise of "evolutionary ethics," the embrace toward ethical relativism, and the slide toward eugenics; Christine Rosen, on how and why early 20th century American religious leaders encouraged eugenics in the name of moral progress; and Dana Gioia, on the decline in literary reading in America and on the cultural loss it signifies.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 69

Guests on Volume 69: John McWhorter, author of Doing Our Own Thing: The Degradation of Language and Music and Why We Should, Like, Care, on the death of formal speech; Douglas Koopman, on the mis-steps and misunderstandings that hampered the Bush administration's implementation of Faith-Based Initiatives; Daniel Ritchie, on the survival of “Great Books” programs at religious colleges; Vincent Miller, on how the commodification of everything affects our sense of religious faith and practice (and on how we can resist); and Barrett Fisher, on the sources of humor in the two versions of The Ladykillers, and on the history of very serious thinking about what makes something funny.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 68

Guests on Volume 68: Murray Milner, Jr., on American teenagers, schools, and the culture of consumption, and on how the choices of parents create the institutional framework for the lives of adolescents; Steven C. Vryhof, on faith-based schools and the maintaining of community; Douglas J. Schuurman, on recovering the Reformation's vision of vocation as neighbor-love and instrument of providence; Robert Gagnon, on Biblical teaching about homosexuality and how it is being ignored; Richard Stivers, on the role of technologies and "technique" in creating a sense of loneliness; and Quentin Schultze, on the role of religious paradigms in the American understanding of mass media.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 67

Guests on Volume 67: Eric O. Jacobsen, on urban churches and taking the concrete realities of community seriously; Allan C. Carlson, on the family in American culture and in government policy; Terence L. Nichols, on a sacramental view of Creation as an alternative to naturalism; R. R. Reno, on spiritual lethargy and sloth and the need for a more heroic vision for spiritual possibility; David Bentley Hart, on a Christian understanding of beauty rooted in the reality of the divine gift that is Creation; and J. A. C. Redford & Scott Cairns, on the making of "The Martyrdom of Polycarp."

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 66

Guests on Volume 66: Leon Kass, on how various biotechnologies promise to fulfill certain legitimate human desires in illegitimate ways, and on how new technologies have changed the assumptions many people have about their children; Nigel Cameron, on why American churches have been negligent in promoting robust thinking about the current bioethical crisis; Susan Wise Bauer, on how adults can acquire many of the benefits of a classical education long after leaving school by reading wisely and well; Esther Lightcap Meek, on belief, doubt, certainty, authority, and how knowledge (of God and other matters) is acquired, sustained, and properly recognized; John Shelton Lawrence, on how John Wayne, Clint Eastwood, Superman, and the governor of California all embody a great American myth; and Ralph C. Wood, on the disappointing discrepancies between Peter Jackson's films and J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 65

Guests on Volume 65: Stephen G. Post, on why there should be more room for public forms of religious expression; Glenn C. Altschuler, on the advent of rock 'n' roll, and the various fears it created; Mark Oppenheimer, on the importance of style and the rise of radical informality; Johnny Cash, on faith, vocation, the Incarnation, and the Last Supper; George Marsden, on how Jonathan Edwards understood world history and the American experience; and Julian Johnson, on various misunderstandings about classical music, the differences between music as art and music as commodity, and on expectations of immediate gratification in music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 64

Guests on Volume 64: Paul Berman, on the links between Islamism and other totalitarian utopias; Jean Bethke Elshtain, on justice and the vocation of government, and on maintaining a sense of the holy; Hadley Arkes, on natural rights and "inadvertant treason," and on the rise of a new jurisprudence in Griswold v. Connecticut and Roe v. Wade; Ralph C. Wood, on the place of the seven virtues in J. R. R. Tolkien's vision of the moral life in The Lord of the Rings; and Jeremy Begbie, on what we learn about time, theology, and the structure of creation from the experience of music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 63

Guests on Volume 63: Charles M. Sennott, on the dwindling Christian presence in the Middle East; Nicholas Orme, on the nature of childhood in the Middle Ages; J. Budziszewski, on the testimony of conscience and What We Can't Not Know; Albert Borgmann, on the necessity of deliberate reflection about how technology shapes everyday life; James A. Herrick, on The Making of the New Spirituality: The Eclipse of the Western Religious Tradition, and on Mormonism, gnosticism, and the significance of Luke Skywalker; Darrell Cole, on contemporary cynicism about the possiblity of justice and the just war tradition; and Jackson Lears, on the deeper cultural roots of contemporary attitudes toward gambling.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 62

Guests on Volume 62: Craig Bernthal, on the theme of judgment in the plays of Shakespeare; James Turner Johnson, on recent distortions of the just war tradition; Alissa Quart, on Branded: the Buying and Selling of Teenagers; Stephen M. Barr, on how modern science has challenged the materialist view of human nature; Lilian Calles Barger, on beauty, the body, spirituality, and the "true self," and on why the food court at the megachurch isn't what our neighbors need; and Corby Kummer, on the connections between food and community.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 61

Guests on Volume 61: Ian Dowbiggin, on the history of the “right to die”movement; Arthur J. Dyck, on Life's Worth: The Case against Assisted Suicide; Daniel Dreisbach, on the building of Jefferson's "wall of separation"; Michael L. Peterson, on the elements of a Christian philosophy of education; Stephen Schwartz, on the differences between Balkan Muslims and those of Saudi Arabia; Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, on how young people are taught to invest in themselves rather than family or community; and John H. Timmerman, on the person and poetry of Jane Kenyon and on how she lived and worked.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 60

Guests on Volume 60: David Naugle, on the origins of the term "worldview," and the spiritual and religious significance of "worldview thinking" for Christians; D. G. Hart, on the distinctions between evangelicalism and confessional Protestantism; Dermot Quinn, on the historical wisdom of Christopher Dawson, and the skepticism of contemporary historians; Russell Hittinger, on how a right to privacy emerged and evolved in American constitutional law and on how a landmark federal court decision addressed physician-assisted suicide; Leon Kass, on why a commitment to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness is not enough to protect human dignity; and James Howard Kunstler, on how designing spaces that respect cars but not pedestrians has made so much of America unlovable if not unlivable.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 59

Guests on Volume 59: Ron Hansen, on how novelists discover the themes of their writing; Bernard Lewis, on the history of Islamic resentment toward the West; Alan Jacobs, on Michael Chabon's Summerland and Cornelia Funke's The Thief Lord; Adrienne Chaplin, on Art and Soul: Signposts for Christians in the Arts and on the place and responsibility of Christian artists in their communities; Todd Gitlin, on how the torrent of images and sounds overwhelms our lives; and Quentin Schultze, on practical disciplines to live well in the midst of intrusive communications technology.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 58

Guests on Volume 58: Hubert Dreyfus, on the limits of artificial intelligence; Francis Fukuyama, on biotechnology and the arrogance of "participatory evolution"; Gordon Preece, on the underlying assumption of Peter Singer's ethical ideas; Gijs van Hensbergen, on the marvelous architecture of Antoni Gaudí; Ted Prescott, on why the idea of beauty was rejected in the 20th century, and how it is returning; and Bradley J. Birzer, on the mythic roots of Middle Earth in J. R. R. Tolkien's The Silmarillion and on Tolkien's idea of myth.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 57

Guests on Volume 57: John Hare, on why morality makes sense only on Christian grounds; Clifford Putney, on "muscular Christianity" and the origins of the YMCA; Andrei S. Markovits, on modernity, sports, and soccer in America; Wilmer Mills, on time, narrative, and the sequences of life, and on two of his poems; Steve Bruce, on diversity, individualism, secularization, and the atrophy of faith, and on why rational choice theory doesn't apply to religion; Colleen Carroll, on The New Faithful: Why Young Adults Are Embracing Christian Orthodoxy; and Michael Budde & Robert Brimlow, Christianity Incorporated, on why Christianity should seem strange.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 56

Guests on Volume 56: Miroslav Volf, on Practicing Theology: Beliefs and Practices in Christian Life; J. Judd Owen, on liberal democracy and the taming of religion; David Jacobson, on citizenship and belonging to a place; Belden Lane, on Landscapes of the Sacred: Geography and Narrative in American Spirituality; Alister McGrath, on the doctrine of Creation and the tasks of culture; Don W. King, on the poetry of C. S. Lewis; Edward Norman, on the logic of secularization; and Peter Augustine Lawler, on the proper meaning of postmodernism and “Bobos” and the end of history.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 55

Guests on Volume 55: John Kelsay, on Islam, the West, and the threat of secularism; Robert George, on Oliver Wendell Holmes and the rise of legal realism; Michael McConnell, on Christian responses to the dominant theories of law in the 20th century; Mark Noll, on The Old Religion in a New World: The History of North American Christianity; J. C. Whitehouse, on Georges Bernanos and the mystery of the human person; and Paul Woodruff, on recovering the virtue of reverence.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 54

Guests on Volume 54: Robert P. Kraynak, on Christian Faith and Modern Democracy: God and Politics in the Fallen World; Mitchell L. Stevens, on home schooling and the individuality of children; Ralph C. Wood, on the Christian achievement of detective novelist P. D. James; Mark Henrie, on the films of Whit Stillman and the overcoming of irony; Terry Lindvall, on the responses of American churches to the advent of motion pictures; Richard J. Mouw, on sin, culture, and common grace; and Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, on her book In Quiet Light: Poems on Vermeer's Women.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 53

Guests on Volume 53: Lawrence Adams, on the possibilities of religious pluralism in Islamic views of state and society; Dana Gioia, on the craft, popularity, and significance of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow; Elmer M. Colyer, on theologian Thomas F. Torrance's understanding of the Incarnation; R. A. Herrera, on how the Christian view of Creation and Incarnation shapes an understanding of history; Margaret Visser, on learning to recognize the deep meaning in the design of Christian churches; and Joseph Pearce, on Tolkien's other writings and on his view of myth and story.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 52

Guests on Volume 52: Tom Shippey, on J. R. R. Tolkien: Author of the Century; Jeffrey Meyers, on George Orwell’s illuminating use of language; Ralph McInerny, on natural theology and the "subjective turn" in philosophy; Daniel Ritchie, on William Cowper and how we know the world; Ian Ker, on John Henry Newman and the purpose of education; Mark Schwehn, on teaching, community, and virtue; Gilbert Meilaender, on ways to think about work; and Tiina Nunnally, on the prose of Sigrid Undset.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 51

Guests on Volume 51: Nigel Cameron, on the challenges of bioethics and how Christians ignore them; David Blankenhorn, on the public meaning of marriage and the private sector and the family; Robert Wuthnow, on creativity and faith; Mortimer Adler, on philosophical theism and How to Think about God; Roger Lundin, on the vision of William Blake; Dana Gioia, on the place of poetry and the way words work; Mary Midgley, on the ways science explains reality; and Ted Libbey, on the life and music of Edmund Rubbra.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 50

Guests on Volume 50: Stanley Carlson-Thies, on the theology of "charitable choice"; Bruce S. Thornton, on the loss of ends and the exultation of appetite in the academy; A. J. Conyers, on the origins of the modern view of tolerance (and of Big Government); Stanton L. Jones, on various configurations of science, morality, and homosexuality; Arthur Holmes, on the history of Christianity and education in the liberal arts; Carson Holloway, on All Shook Up: Music, Passion, and Politics; Ted Prescott, on the popular paintings and the prophetic claims of Thomas Kinkade; and Glenn C. Arbery, on the achievement of form in literature.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 49

Guests on Volume 49: David Lyon, on the reconfiguration of religion against the backdrop of communication technologies and consumerism; Christopher Wolfe, on homosexuality in American public life; Patrick Fagan, on how sexuality became separated from parenthood; Joseph E. Davis, on the struggle to preserve the self in a fragmenting era; Morris Berman, on The Twilight of American Culture; Frank Burch Brown, on Good Taste, Bad Taste, and Christian Taste: Aesthetics in Religious Life; Robert K. Johnston, on neglected opportunities for film and theology to interact; and Ralph C. Wood, on the peculiar heroism of Frogo Baggins of Bag End.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 48

Guests on Volume 48: Jon Butler, on the United States as a modern society—in 1776; Gary Cross, on An All-Consuming Century: Why Commercialism Won in Modern America; Zygmunt Bauman, on the loss of permanence and solidity; Pico Iyer, on The Global Soul: Jet Lag, Shopping Malls, and the Search for Home; Richard Stivers, on sex and violence in media and the rule of technology; Larry Woiwode, on stories and giving form to experience; Alan Jacobs, on Philip Pullman's "His Dark Materials" trilogy; and James Trott, on poetry and piety.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 47

Guests on Volume 47: Christopher Clausen, on detachment from normative communities in a post-cultural age; Don Eberly, on the meaning of and challenges for civil society; George Weigel, on Pope John Paul II's theology of embodiment and sexuality; Luci Shaw, on poetry that reminds us that Christ's suffering shadows over the celebration of the Incarnation; Steve Wilkens, on Christianity and Western Thought: A History of Philosophers, Ideas, and Movements; David Harvey, on place and spaces, public and private; John Durham Peters, on the utopianism present in the modern idea of communication; and Masaaki Suzuki, on the ways in which Bach's music is a vehicle for the Gospel.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 46

Guests on Volume 46: E. Michael Jones, on how horror films combat the assumptions of the Enlightenment; D. G. Hart, on The University Gets Religion: Religious Studies in American Higher Education; Amy & Leon Kass, on training young people to imagine what love looks like; John Leax, on the challenges of wise "caretaking" in a fallen world; Richard Wilbur, on the ways in which words add "articulateness" to experience; Roger Lundin, on Richard Wilbur's commitment to the reality of creation; and Ted Libbey, on the intricate, theologically inspired structure of Bach's B Minor Mass.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 45

Guests on Volume 45: Jeff Speck, on how suburban sprawl prevents the formation of real neighborhoods; Victor Davis Hanson, on the demise of family farms and what it means for American democracy; Allan C. Carlson, on the contributions (and weaknesses) of 20th century agrarian thinkers; Paulina Borsook, on how Silicon Valley enshrines libertarian values; John F. Kilner, on possible strategies for rejecting cloning in the courts; Robert E. Webber, on Ancient-Future Faith: Rethinking Evangelicalism for a Postmodern World; and Christoph Wolff, on how J. S. Bach used music to pursue an understanding of God through creation.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 44

Guests on Volume 44: James Davison Hunter, on the limits of the psychological view of character; Brian Robertson, on the changes in attitudes toward work and home; David Myers, on the disjunction of wealth and happiness, and crafting a "new American dream"; Robert Frank, on the escalation of luxury and how it can be slowed; Gayle Brandow Samuels, on trees, landscape, and cultural identity; Thomas Hine, on The Rise and Fall of the American Teenager; Thomas Hibbs, on Seinfeld, Hannibal Lecter, and nihilism in popular culture; and Robin Leaver, on how J. S. Bach used musical forms to impart theological truths.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 43

Guests on Volume 43: Jedediah Purdy, on the ironic mood and its effect on public life; Lendol Calder, on the cultural significance of consumer credit; John Nelson, on Soli Deo Gloria, commissioning sacred classical works; George Arasimowicz, on crafting a tone poem about the life of Peter; James Calvin Schaap, on writing and the challenge to piety; Frederick Buechner, on the ministry of memoirs and the importance of remembering; Kay Hymowitz, on mistaken ideas of adulthood and childhood; and Calvin Stapert, on My Only Comfort: Death, Deliverance, and Discipleship in the Music of Bach.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 42

Guests on Volume 42: Michael Kammen, on the historical transition from popular to mass culture; Philip Fisher, on Still the New World: American Literature in a Culture of Creative Destruction; John Horgan, on the limits of neuroscience; William Dembski, on detecting intelligent design through "specified complexity"; Steven Garber, on the breadth of Michael Polanyi's thought; Dorothy Bass, on the need to restore form to our experience of time; Paul Vitz, on Faith of the Fatherless: The Psychology of Atheism; J. Budziszewski, on The Revenge of Conscience: Politics and the Fall of Man; and David Aikman, on the heroism of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 41

Guests on Volume 41: Harry Blamires, on resisting secularism; David Healy, on antidepressants and the concept of disease; Christine Pohl, on the modern challenges to the practice of hospitality; Paul Gutjahr, on the changing place of the Bible in American culture; Francis Fukuyama, on human nature and the shape of moral community; Paul Corby Finney, on visual arts and the Calvinist tradition; and J. A. C. Redford, on Christmas Music and the Incarnation.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 40

Guests on Volume 40: Joseph Epstein, on writing essays and education through magazines; John Gray, on the cultural contradictions of global capitalism; Kenneth R. Craycraft, Jr., on why the First Amendment doesn't really protect Christian liberty; William T. Pizzi, on Trials without Truth: Why Our System of Criminal Trials Has Become an Expensive Failure and What We Need to Do to Rebuild It; Pamela Walker Laird, on how nineteeth-century advertising promoted progress; Albert Borgmann, on how technology disengages us from experiencing reality; Neal Stephenson, on the "eureka" moments with codes and computers; and Alan Jacobs, on why Harry Potter's magic shouldn't trouble Christians.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 39

Guests on Volume 39: Neal Gabler, on how entertainment has become the highest value in our culture; C. John Sommerville, on How the News Makes Us Dumb: The Death of Wisdom in an Information Society; John L. Locke, on the value of personal interaction, and how technology is displacing it; Vigen Guroian, on gardening; Marion Montgomery, on how higher education has lost its way; Peter Berkowitz, on why liberal democracies need virtuous citizens; Harry Clor, on the need for the law to return to encouraging a public morality; and Ted Libbey, on French composer Francis Poulenc.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 38

Guests on Volume 38: Craig Gay, on how modern culture encourages atheism; Alvin Kernan, on why the academy can't afford to be too democratic; Erik Davis, on myth, magic, and mysticism in the age of information; Marva Dawn, on teaching children about being the Church; Wendy Shalit, on the lost virtue of female modesty; Marva Dawn, on sexual education and the Church's children; Leon Podles, on why men are often alienated from Christianity; and Dan Blazer, on the incomplete conversation between psychiatry and Christianity.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 37

Guests on Volume 37: Gregory Wolfe, on how "religious humanism" follows the model of the incarnation; Jill P. Baumgaertner, on violence and the grotesque in Flannery O'Connor; D. Bruce Lockerbie, on the struggle of many modern writers against religion; Roger Lundin, on Alfred Kazin's God and the American Writer; Donald McCullough, on the religious rootedness of courtesy; David Nye, on how technologies build cultural momentum in unexpected ways; Kathleen Powers Erickson, on the Spiritual Vision of Vincent Van Gogh; and Michael Marissen, on how J. S. Bach avoided anti-Judaism.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 36

Guests on Volume 36: Vigen Guroian, on cultivating virtue in children; James Tunstead Burtchaell, on how church-related colleges become secularized; Dallas Willard, on training church leaders; Robert Wuthnow, on how spiritual seekers understand their beliefs; Thomas Oden, on why the contemporary Church must learn from the early Church; Darrel Amundsen, on the early Church's views on suicide; Edward J. Larson, on what really happened at the Scopes trial; and Roger Lundin, on Emily Dickinson.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 35

Guests on Volume 35: Jill Paton Walsh, on completing Dorothy Sayers's unfinished novel, Thrones, Dominations; James Como, on the rhetorical skills of C. S. Lewis; Walter Hooper, on his first meeting with C. S. Lewis; Victor Davis Hanson, on how Greek convictions shaped Western institutions; Robert C. Roberts, on Christian psychology and the definition of human personality; David Gill, on Jacques Ellul's The Presence of the Kingdom; Ted Smith, III, on Richard Weaver's Ideas Have Consequences; and Ken Myers, on Christmas Music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 34

Guests on Volume 34: Michael Aeschliman, on C. S. Lewis and the problem of scientism; Jeremy Rifkin, on The Biotech Century: Harnessing the Gene And Remaking the World; Jean Bethke Elshtain, on Vaclav Havel, identity politics, and the possibilities of democracy; Katherine Shaw Spaht, on the purposes of covenant marriage laws; Steven L. Nock, on why married couples divorce; Louise Cowan, on how classics address our imagination; Ramsey MacMullen, on the rise of Christendom; and Ted Libbey, on the music of Hildegard von Bingen.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 33

Guests on Volume 33: Elizabeth Haiken, on Venus Envy: A History of Cosmetic Surgery; Patrick Glynn, on recovering belief; Thomas Howard, on C. S. Lewis's Till We Have Faces; David Wells, on how our culture distracts us from remembering moral nature; Peter Heslam, on Abraham Kuyper, Calvinist theologian and statesman; Suzanna Sherry, on the assault on truth in legal scholarship; Ted Libbey, on Felix Mendelssohn's oratorios, Elijah and Paulus; and David Wells, on the contrast between classic and postmodern spirituality.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 32

Guests on Volume 32: Mark Kingwell, on hope and fear at the edge of the millennium; Daniel Pipes, on where beliefs about conspiracies come from; Herb Kutchins, on the DSM and problems in making mental health diagnoses; Nicholas Wolterstorff, on the presence of God in the paintings of Stanley Spencer; Vincent Scully, on the nature of cities and urban life; Richard Moe, on preserving communities and saving old buildings; Joel Carpenter, on fundamentalism as a true religious movement, not a reactionary social movement; and Bruce L. Edwards, Jr., on learning from and teaching C. S. Lewis.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 31

Guests on Volume 31: David Orgon Coolidge, on Dale v. Boy Scouts, which requires the Scouts to admit homosexuals; James Twitchell, on how American culture has eliminated shame from our experience; Thomas Frank, on how advertisers came to link their products with the idea of self-fulfillment; Keith Windschuttle, on the killing of the discipline of history; Wilfred McClay, on history and academic advancement; David Harlan, on history as moral reflection; Wilfred McClay, on historian David Harlan; and Gilbert Meilaender, on C. S. Lewis's self-denying gospel.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 30

Guests on Volume 30: Glenn Stanton, on the health of marriages and the health of society; Caroline J. Simon, on love, destiny, and imagination; Paul Marshall, on the theological meaning of vocation; David Lowenthal, on American Constitutional design and the need for virtue; Reinder Van Til, on Lost Daughters: Recovered Memory Therapy and the People It Hurts; John Ellis, on Literature Lost: Social Agendas and the Corruption of the Humanities; and Clyde Kilby, on C. S. Lewis and the roles of reason and imagination.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 29

Guests on Volume 29: Richard John Neuhaus, on the recent judicial usurpation of democracy; John Patrick Diggins, on Max Weber's insights into democracy and leadership; Norman Cantor, on how postmodern culture resembles the baroque period; Alan Jacobs, on William Faulkner as a modernist and a Southerner; Charles Marsh, on the theological depth of the civil rights movement; David Park, on how pre-modern Christians understood light; and Ted Libbey, on Franz Schubert's role in inventing Romanticism.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 28

Guests on Volume 28: Gregory Wolfe, on Malcolm Muggeridge; Dana Mack, on how our culture makes raising kids difficult; James L. Nolan, on why therapeutic ideas are showing up in laws and in courts; Thomas H. Naylor, on the Babelesque dangers of giantism; Daniel Ritchie, on the political wisdom of Edmund Burke; Edward Tenner, on how machines get their revenge; and Richard Noll, on Carl Jung as The Aryan Christ.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 27

Guests on Volume 27: John Horgan, on whether or not we're coming to the end of the age of science; Keith Devlin, on the limits of logic; Robert Kanigel, on modern industrial efficiency; Kate Campbell, on music and memories; Patrick Samway, on Walker Percy: A Life; J. Budziszewski, on tolerance and the law "written on the heart"; Jeff Johnson, on his recordings with flutist Brian Dunning; and Stephen Lawhead, on retelling the Arthurian legends.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 26

Guests on Volume 26: James Gilbert, on how science and religion negotiate for public respect; William Everdell, on the meaning and method of modernism; David Walsh, on the genius of liberal democracy; Alan Jacobs, on The Dictionary of Global Culture and "Real" Global Culture; Jeffrey Meikle, on American Plastic: A Cultural History; Jeffrey Burton Russell, on A History of Heaven: The Singing Silence; Roger Lundin, on Harry Mulisch's novel, The Discovery of Heaven; and Gordon Kreplin, on music, craft, gift, and beauty.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 25

Guests on Volume 25: Douglas Groothuis, on The Soul in Cyberspace; Harold Bloom, on the Gnostic view of creation and fall; Gilbert Meilaender, on the outlines of a distinctively Christian bioethics; Susan Bergman, on martyrs and the meaning of suffering; Paul Marshall, on international persecution of Christians; George Marsden, on The Outrageous Idea of Christian Scholarship; Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, on divorce as a democratic institution; and Leonard Payton, on The Pilgrim's Progress by Ralph Vaughn Williams.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 24

Guests on Volume 24: James Davison Hunter, on a survey about American political life conducted by the Post-Modernity Project; Robert H. Bork, on judicial complicity in the coarsening of America; Rochelle Gurstein, on how some advocates of unbridled free expression had second thoughts; Roger Shattuck, on how we've lost the ability to recognize the fact that some knowledge is bad for us; Michael Behe, on how complexity in cells suggests an intelligent designer; David Morgan, on the Paintings of Warner Sallman; and Ted Libbey, on Gabriel Fauré's Requiem.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 23

Guests on Volume 23: John Steadman Rice, on how the idea of codependency is based on tenets of "liberation psychotherapy"; E. D. Hirsch, Jr., on The Schools We Need and Why We Don't Have Them; Ted McAllister, on Revolt Against Modernity: Leo Strauss, Eric Voeglin, and the Search for a Postliberal Order; Judith Skelton Grant, on Robertson Davies: Man of Myth; Terry Teachout, on why music should not be propagandistic; John Boyle, on his Requiem for the Unborn; Leland Ryken, on what makes a classic and how we should read one; and Daniel Ritchie, on a Biblical view of language and literature.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 22

Guests on Volume 22: Andrew Delbanco, on how American culture has effaced the idea of evil; Michael Uhlmann, on two appellate court cases concerning the matter of doctor-assisted suicide; Carlos F. Gomez, on why some American doctors have embraced the idea of killing their patients; Michael Sandel, on the dangers of seeing democracy merely as morally neutral "procedures" to adjudicate differences; Hadley Arkes, on how arguments for legalizing same-gender marriages go further than their advocates would like; and Robert George, on why marriage is an intrinsic good.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 21

Guests on Volume 21: James Twitchell, on ways advertising shapes (and thins out) American culture; Lynne Cheney, on the politics of ideas in higher education; Peter Berkowitz, on how Friedrich Nietzsche was torn between certainty of the "death of God" and belief in the divinity of truth; Ron Hansen, on what makes good fiction; Frederica Mathewes-Green, on "The America We Seek," an important pro-life manifesto; Robert Higgs, on how professional sports have lost a sense of play; Terry Eastland, on why affirmative action is ending; and Ted Libbey, on Brahms's German Requiem.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 20

Guests on Volume 20: Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, on the benefits of single-sex education, and the confusion of "elite" feminism; Robert D. Richardson, Jr., on why the work of Ralph Waldo Emerson continues to attract certain religious seekers; Roger Lundin, on Emerson's assertion of alternatives to Christianity, and how they have seeped under the American cultural skin; Wilfred McClay, on individualism and collectivism in American society; Andrew A. Tadie, on learning to love and learn from G. K. Chesterton; Robert Jenson, on why the life of the mind matters to the Church, and how it should take shape in the world; Ted Prescott, on why artists have been attracted to abstraction, and what viewers should look for in abstract art; and Ted Libbey, on Haydn's The Creation.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 19

Guests on Volume 19: Robert Goodman, on economic and moral effects of state-sponsored gambling; Ted Prescott, on modernist artists Brancusi and Mondrian, and why they were attracted to abstraction; Daniel Chirot, on how resentful nationalism and utopian ideologies combine to form Modern Tyrants; Edward Ericson, Jr., on books by and about Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn; Alan Jacobs, on the portrayal of morals and manners in films based on Jane Austen novels; Charles Sykes, on why schools have abandoned the life of the mind; Allan C. Carlson, on what's wrong with Hillary Rodham Clinton's It Takes a Village; and Thomas Connolly, on music and cosmic coherence.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 18

Guests on Volume 18: Leigh Eric Schmidt, on how the marketplace has shaped American celebration of the holidays; John Patrick Diggins, on how pragmatism fails to offer a coherent way of understanding of the world; Joseph Frank, on moral themes in the fiction of Fyodor Dostoevsky; Thomas Howard, on the supernatural thrillers of Charles Williams; Ken Myers, on Marsalis on Music, a book and a video series on music appreciation; Deal Hudson, on the themes of family in the work of Sigrid Undset, author of Kristin Lavransdatter and The Master of Hestviken; George McKenna, on how President Lincoln might have fought abortion; and Ted Libbey, on master English composer Henry Purcell.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 17

Guests on Volume 17: Alan Jacobs, on the seafaring fiction of novelist Patrick O'Brian; Barry Sanders, on the deeper dynamics of literacy; Mark Slouka, on bizarre Gnostic temptations in cyberspace; Alan Ehrenhalt, on how valuing choice hurts community; Geoffrey T. Holtz, on twenty-somethings and the shape of family life; Mardi Keyes, on dubious assumptions about the nature of adolescence; W. Bradford Wilcox, on tradition and belief; Glenn Loury, on race and relationships; and John Hodges, on the influence of Russian Orthodoxy in the music of John Tavener.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 16

Guests on Volume 16: Philip Cushman, on the cultural history of psychotherapy in America; R. Laurence Moore, on religious disestablishment and the growth imperative; Keith J. Pavlischek, on the shrinking foundations supporting religious liberty; Dean M. Kelley, on the government's deadly interpretation of the Branch Davidian religion; Alan Jacobs, on the storytelling powers of neurologist Oliver Sacks; Kathleen Murphy, on Ingmar Bergman's films and the lack of seriousness in contemporary film; Michael Allen Gillespie, on the medieval (and theological) sources of nihilism; Robert Wilken, on similarities between the early Church's culture and our own; and Francis Crociata, on the music of American composer Leo Sowerby.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 15

Guests on Volume 15: Jean Bethke Elshtain, on Democracy on Trial; Barry Alan Shain, on communalism in early American Protestantism; Christopher Wolfe, on the moral basis for strong local government; A. G. Mojtabai, on how contemporary novelists ignore religion; Robert Pinsky, on the challenges of translating Dante's Inferno; Suzanne Wolfe, on choosing books for children; Amy Waldman, on the ersatz community of TV shopping networks; Mark Crispin Miller, on the dehumanized feeling so common in modern advertising; Ted Prescott, on the Whitney Biennial, Bruce Nauman, and the "Mutant Materials" exhibit; and Edward Rothstein, on the inner meaning of music and mathematics.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 14

Guests on Volume 14: Thomas Cahill, on the story of How the Irish Saved Civilization; Mark Noll, on the history of Evangelical anti-intellectualism; Paul Davies, on God and time; William Lane Craig, on problems in the thinking of Paul Davies; Alan Jacobs, on the moral dumbing down of Louisa May Alcott's novel in the movie version of Little Women; Drew Trotter, on the moral indifference of filmmaker Quentin Tarantino; Cornelius Plantinga, Jr., on the need for a recovery of the meaning of sin; Eugene Genovese, on learning from the Southern Agrarians; and Ted Libbey, on J. S. Bach's St. John Passion.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 13

Guests on Volume 13: Richard Noll, on the influence of paganism in the life and thought of C. G. Jung; Armand Nicholi, on Sigmund Freud's religious longings; Jackson Lears, on how advertising detaches us from the world; Alan Jacobs, on Anne Rice and the popularity of her vampire novels; Ken Myers, on reporting about religion; Rand & Robyn Miller, on MYST, the bestselling computer game; Sven Birkerts, on how the act of reading assists in building self-understanding; Stephen G. Smith, on his magazine Civilization, produced in cooperation with the Library of Congress; and Deal Hudson, on the return of melody in modern music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 12

Guests on Volume 12: George Weigel, on posturing and prudence in pro-life politics; Don Eberly, on the inability of politics to cure cultural problems; David Wells, on recapturing a "weighty" understanding of God; Alan Jacobs, on the Christian conviction of poet Christina Rossetti; Ken Myers, on instances of naturalistic positivism in recent science journalism; Nancy Pearcey, on misunderstanding the history of science; Leon Kass, on the deeper meaning of eating; and John Hodges, on J. S. Bach's Christmas Oratorio.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 11

Guests on Volume 11: Richard Skolnik, on Baseball and the Pursuit of Innocence: A Fresh Look at the Old Ball Game; Laura Nash, on the influence of religious faith in the marketplace; Dick Keyes, on heroism, character, and the imitation of Christ; Douglas LeBlanc, on musings on mortality by the Crash Test Dummies; Ken Myers, on Michael Moore's TV Nation and terminal irony in prime time; Gene Edward Veith, on communicating truth to a cynical age; Alan Jacobs, on Chinua Achebe and the dilemma of living between two cultures; and Ted Libbey, on Beethoven's Missa Solemnis.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 10

Guests on Volume 10: Paul Vitz, on the meaning of freedom and the dangers of "selfism"; Robert Wuthnow, on small groups and the changing understanding and practice of Christian faith; Marjorie Mead, on Shadowlands and the real personalities of C. S. Lewis and Joy Davidman; Martha Bayles, on why modern artists feel compelled to shock; Ken Myers, on our culture's disturbing fascination with death; Ted Prescott, on the spirit and contemporary manifestations of Surrealism; George Marsden, on the establishment of nonbelief in American universities; and John Hodges, on Gregorian chant.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 9

Guests on Volume 9: William Bennett, on the power of stories in the cultivation of virtue; Mark Juergensmeyer, on religious nationalism and the possibilities of new cold wars; Ed Knippers, on the spiritual reasons for the vivid physicality of his paintings of Biblical narratives; Joshua Gamson, on Claims to Fame: Celebrity in Contemporary America; Ken Myers, on "attitude" and violence in pop culture and on the streets; Richard Doerflinger, on the ethical numbness of the NIH Embryo Research Panel; Richard John Neuhaus, on assisted suicide and the chilling prospects of modern eugenics; and Ted Libbey, on making an initial approach to classical music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 8

Guests on Volume 8: Alan Jacobs, on novelist Iris Murdoch and how fiction encourages reflection in the moral life; Gilbert Meilaender, on "Random Acts of Kindness," cultivating virtue, and the meaning of kindness; Richard Lints, on The Fabric of Theology: A Prolegomenon to Evangelical Theology; Lynn Neary, on religion reporting's rebirth in the mainstream media; Ken Myers, on Recent Periodicals; James Davison Hunter, on the superficiality of journalism; Howard Rheingold, on the viability of "Virtual Community"; and Dominic Aquila, on Estonian composer Arvo Pärt's Te Deum.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 7

Guests on Volume 7: Dean Kenyon, on his fight for academic freedom at San Francisco State University; Phillip Johnson, on scientists' intolerance toward theories about intelligent design; Jane Metcalfe, on technology and community; John Hodges, on sacred music by Ralph Vaughan Williams; Dominic Aquila, on the late cultural critic, Christopher Lasch; Robert Royal, on "Reinventing the American People," multiculturalism and the shaping of national identity; Ted Prescott, on the British realist painter Lucian Freud; and Drew Trotter, on Steven Spielberg's Oscar-winning Schindler's List.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 6

Guests on Volume 6: Terry Eastland, on the history of the Supreme Court's interpretation of religious liberty; Ted Prescott, on nudity in art and advertising; Wade Clark Roof, on A Generation of Seekers: The Spiritual Journeys of the Baby Boom Generation; Alan Jacobs, on W. H. Auden's poetry and social philosophy; Ken Myers, on the culture of therapy; Neil Postman, on how technology alters consciousness; Roger Lundin, on The Culture of Interpretation: Christian Faith and the Postmodern World; and Roger Bullard, on Messiah: The Gospel According to Handel's Oratorio.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 5

Guests on Volume 5: David Aikman, on his novel When the Almond Tree Blossoms, and on the perpetual temptations of totalitarianism; Edward Ericson, Jr., on Solzhenitsyn's moral foundation and his criticism of modern Western culture; James Pontuso, on the spiritual dimensions of freedom; James Finn, on the United Nations World Conference on human rights; Ken Myers, on L. A. Law's Bob Jones graduate, and on how TV promotes glibness; Ralph C. Wood, on the backslidden comedy of novelist Peter De Vries; Stephen Bates, on textbooks and the First Amendment in Hawkins County, Tennessee; and Drew Trotter, on director Martin Scorsese's The Age of Innocence.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 4

Guests on Volume 4: Alan Jacobs, on The Bridges of Madison County by Robert James Waller, and why sentimentalism in life and in art is a moral problem; Alzina Stone Dale, on unknown fiction by Dorothy Sayers, and how she was a certain kind of feminist; Ken Myers, on composer John Tavener, and on religious symbolism in high fashion; Paul McHugh, on how psychiatrists allow themselves to be swept up by the Zeitgeist; Herbert Schlossberg, on renewal in the churches and in society; and John Hodges, on Leonard Bernstein's view of religion and music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 3

Guests on Volume 3: Andrew Kimbrell, on the bioethical issues discussed in The Human Body Shop; Allan C. Carlson, on From Cottage to Workstation: The Family's Search for Social Harmony in the Industrial Age; Larry Woiwode, on Flannery O'Connor, John Updike, and what fiction is good for; Peter Kreeft, on the reasonableness of faith, the devilishness of deconstructionism, and The Snakebite Letters; Alan Jacobs, on The Children of Men by P. D. James; Thomas Morris, on Blaise Pascal and why people still ask the Big Questions; Jay Tolson, on how Walker Percy's search for authenticity led to his conversion; and John Hodges, on the popularity of Henryck Gorecki's Third Symphony.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 2

Guests on Volume 2: P. D. James, on why evil characters are easier to depict than good characters, and why some people like mysteries while others don't; William Kilpatrick, on Why Johnny Can't Tell Right from Wrong: Moral Illiteracy and the Case for Character Education; James Schall, on what sports and games tell us about human nature; A. N. Wilson, on how writing the biography of C. S. Lewis led him to renounce belief in Christianity; Michael Aeschliman, on why A. N. Wilson is wrong about C. S. Lewis; Russell Hittinger, on the Supreme Court's decision in Planned Parenthood vs. Casey; and Richard Crawford, on composer William Billings, one of the first important American composers of sacred music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 1

Guests on Volume 1: D. G. Hart, on Oliver Stone's JFK and why film has trouble relating historical realities; Peter Kreeft, on Between Heaven and Hell, a post-death dialogue among John F. Kennedy, C. S. Lewis, and Aldous Huxley; Nigel Cameron, on the loss of the Hippocratic tradition in medicine; Ted Prescott, on the life and work of the late English painter Francis Bacon; Quentin Schultze, on Pat Robertson's plans to begin a 24-hour game show TV channel; James Davison Hunter, on Culture Wars: The Struggle to Define America; Gregory Wolfe, on Mark Helprin's novel, A Soldier of the Great War; Edward Mendelson, on how poet W. H. Auden responded to modern culture; and Ted Libbey, on soprano Kathleen Battle.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

In Memoriam: Stratford Caldecott (1953-2014)

Stratford Caldecott, the director of Oxford’s Centre for Faith and Culture and editor of its affiliated journal Second Spring, passed away on July 17, 2014 from cancer. Caldecott was a guest on volumes 102 and 116 of the Journal. He was the author of several books, including Beauty for Truth’s Sake (Brazos, 2009) and Beauty in the Word (Angelico Press, 2012). 

MARS HILL AUDIO Anthology 10

The Good City: Community and Urban Order

In this Anthology, Ken Myers talks with architects, historians, activists, and clergy about how loving our neighbors can and must take shape in how we order the material aspects of shared life. The conversations on this Anthology give particular attention to how the New Urbanist movement has challenged the dehumanizing effects of modernism in urban design. 100 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 15

Roger Kimball, "Josef Pieper: Leisure and Its Discontents"

(from The New Criterion, January 1999)

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 28

The Practice of Christian Pedagogy

In recent years, Christian educators have rediscovered ancient ideas about how the head and heart interact.There is a relationship between the cultivation of affections, dispositions, and virtues, and the acquisition of knowledge. What we believe is inextricably linked to what we love and what we worship. What we love, in turn, is encouraged by practices: by the ways our bodies and imaginations engage the world of the senses. Christian educators are coming to question the idea that teaching is merely the transmission of ideas and are giving more attention to the formative power of classroom practices and the culture of schools. 56 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Book 7

The Passionate Intellect: Incarnational Humanism and the Future of University Education by Norman Klassen and Jens Zimmermann

In The Passionate Intellect, Norman Klassen and Jens Zimmermann trace the history of higher education from its medieval roots to the present, focusing on how educational agendas have been assembled in light of shifting understandings of the nature of knowledge and the nature of human well-being. They demonstrate that some form of humanism has always been central to the purposes of higher education, and insist that the recovery of a rich, Christocentric Christian humanism is the only way for the University to recover a coherent purpose. Read by Ken Myers. 6.5 hours

MARS HILL AUDIO Report 4

Wandering Toward the Altar

Much public attention is given to the decline of marriage and the family in America, but few have thought to relate this decline to the changing ways in which Americans understand and practice courtship. The cultural wisdom and conventions that once guided young men and women in their efforts to find and win suitable partners for marriage are vanishing. Modesty and sexual restraint are ridiculed, while previously stigmatized behaviors such as casual sexual "hook-ups" and premarital cohabitation have become commonplace. Wandering Toward the Altar explores the broader cultural changes behind the end of traditional American courtship, including the rise of youth culture and dating, the demise of the productive family household, careerism and the later age of first marriage, the replacement of romantic imagination with youthful cynicism about love and marriage, and the exclusion of home and family from the practices of courting. This program features studio interviews with Leon and Amy Kass, Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, Wendy Shalit, Allan C. Carlson, Beth Bailey, Steven Nock, Kay Hymowitz, and Douglas Wilson, as well as extensive field reporting. Available on one MP3 CD, or in downloadable MP3 format (burnable to 4 standard CDs). 4.5 hours

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Abraham Kuyper: Modern Calvinist, Christian Democrat

Volume 120 of the MARS HILL AUDIO Journal featured an interview with James Bratt, of Calvin College, on his new biography of Abraham Kuyper. Since Dr. Bratt was such a stimulating guest, we decided to make a longer version of that conversation available here as a free download. Bratt provides a fascinating account of the life and work of Abraham Kuyper; focusing not only on his theological and cultural vision but on the historical and personal events in Kuyper's life that helped shape that vision.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 14

David Lyle Jeffrey, "God's Patient Stet"

(from First Things, July/August 2011)

MARS HILL AUDIO Anthology 9

The Worth of Words: Preserving and Caring for Language

In this Anthology, Ken Myers speaks with guests John McWhorter, Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, and Craig Gay about our world's linguistic ailments. They recognize the power of language to enrich our relationship with God, with each other, and with all of Creation and suggest habits rooted in recognition of the glorious possibilities of words lovingly and thoughtfully employed. 65 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 27

Deadly Legacy: Alan Jacobs on Original Sin

Literary critic and C. S. Lewis biographer Alan Jacobs has enriched our understanding of Christian faith and its consequences with his thoughtful Original Sin: A Cultural History (2008). The book looks at beliefs about human waywardness and its sources through much of Western history, and how those beliefs have affected literature, politics, music, education, and other spheres of human culture. In this Conversation, Jacobs explains how belief in original sin (in its Augustinian form) offers resources for comfort and community. 60 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Book 6

Are Christians Human? An Exploration of True Spirituality by Nigel Cameron

Is humanity -- the quality of being human -- a blessing or a curse? Do we simply put up with it, or do we embrace it? Many Christians consider their purpose in life to deny or escape their humanity. But the humanity of Christians is tied up in the humanity of Christ. If Jesus Christ is human, then his humanity is something to be learned and lived. Many Christians, however, do not believe in the humanity of Jesus and consequently find it hard to affirm and live out their own humanity.

MARS HILL AUDIO Report 2

Tacit Knowing, Truthful Knowing

Though largely ignored, the work of research chemist-turned-philosopher Michael Polanyi (1891-1976) offers rich insight into the methods of science, the role of belief in all human knowing, and the important connections between knowledge and responsibility. Tacit Knowing, Truthful Knowing explores Michael Polanyi's criticisms of both objectivism and subjectivism, and his attempts to develop a more truthful understanding of how we know the world. His ideas are based on the belief that all knowledge is either tacit (silent and unspoken) or rooted in tacit knowledge. This Report features interviews with leading interpreters of Polanyi's thought, including Marjorie Grene, Richard Gelwick, Thomas Torrance, and Martin X. Moleski. Interviews with Nobel Prize-winning chemist Dudley Herschbach, educator Steven Garber, and master violin makers Peter and Wendy Moes, along with readings from Michael Polanyi's books and correspondence, further illuminate his ideas. On MP3 CD, or MP3 download. 2.5 hours

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Oliver O’Donovan in Conversation

The Gospel and Public Life: Cultivating a Faithful Witness in the Face of Challenge

MARS HILL AUDIO Anthology 8

The Vocation of Knowledge: Higher Education and the Difference Christ Makes

In this Anthology, Mark Noll (The Future of Christian Learning) describes why serious Christian learning requires a confidence that the Gospel has broad social and intellectual consequences. Norman Klassen and Jens Zimmermann (The Passionate Intellect: Incarnational Humanism and the Future of University Education) explain why the term "Christian humanism" is especially apt in describing the aims of Christian higher education. James K. A. Smith (Desiring the Kingdom: Worship, Worldview, and Cultural Formation) develops the idea that education is more about formation than information, and that we are formed by our participation in liturgies, whether at church or at the mall. 78 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 13

Robert R. Reilly, "The Music of the Spheres, or the Metaphysics of Music"

(from The Intercollegiate Review, Fall 2001)

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 26

Dancing Lessons: Eugene Peterson on Theology and the Rhythms of Life

In his 2005 book, Christ Plays in Ten Thousand Places, pastor/theologian Eugene Peterson argued that believers should attend to the way God works in creation, history, and community. Such attention prevents theology from being mere abstraction and spirituality from becoming vague and gnostic. In this Conversation, Peterson discusses the necessity of taking time in worship; the benefits and liabilities of small groups; the delightful gifts of language; and the centrality of "fear of the Lord" in describing our response to God's initiative in salvation. 73 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Book 5

A Visit to Vanity Fair: Moral Essays on the Present Age by Alan Jacobs

Alan Jacobs, professor of English at Wheaton College, has been a regular guest on the MARS HILL AUDIO Journal since 1993, discussing subjects ranging from the problem of literary sentimentalism (as in The Bridges of Madison County), and the delights of historical fiction (as in seafaring narratives of Patrick O'Brian) to the repulsive attraction of the vampire novels of Anne Rice. In his most recent book, A Visit to Vanity Fair: Moral Essays on the Present Age, Jacobs displays a similar range of breadth and depth, as well as significant portions of wit and grace. Included are essays on the mystery of true friendship (Friendship and Its Discontents), the severing of theology and literature (Preachers without Poetry), and the desire to know the future (Dowsing in Scripture). 5.5 hours

MARS HILL AUDIO Report 1

Best-Selling Spirituality

As Americans grow increasingly weary with the emptiness and aridity of materialistic culture, they have shown a growing interest in books on spirituality. Best-Selling Spirituality examines the new style of American religious belief through the stories of three best-selling books: The Celestine Prophecy, Embraced by the Light, and Conversations with God. This Report includes interviews with people who have been guided by such books, as well as with various critics. Among the guests featured are Betty Eadie, Robert Wuthnow, Nicholas Wolterstorff, Gene Edward Veith, Peter Jones, and many others. In downloadable MP3 format (burnable to 2 standard CDs). 2 hours

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Robert George on Marriage

Robert George discusses his latest book, co-authored with Sherif Girgis and Ryan Anderson, What is Marriage?, and various aspects of the current debate on same-sex marriage.

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Mickey Craig & Jon Fennell, "Love in the Age of Neuroscience"

(from The New Atlantis, Fall 2005)

MARS HILL AUDIO Anthology 7

On Books and Reading

In this Anthology, Ken Myers talks with poet and former National Endowment for the Arts chairman Dana Gioia about the decline in reading among Americans of all ages and education. Also discussing the benefits of reading and the tragedy of its decline are literary critic Sven Birkerts, painter Makoto Fujimura, columnist Maggie Jackson, pastor-theologian Eugene Peterson, preacher and media ecologist Gregory Reynolds, and portrait painter Catherine Prescott. 73 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 25

The Heav'ns and All the Powers Therein: The Medieval Cosmos and the World of Narnia

For decades, readers and scholars have wondered whether there was a Master Plan for the structure of the seven books in C. S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia. In his book Planet Narnia, Michael Ward makes a compelling case that the qualities attributed to the seven planets in the cosmology of antiquity and the Middle Ages are embodied in the seven books about Narnia. In this Conversation with Ken Myers, Ward explains why Lewis thought the pre-Copernican view of the cosmos can still be of spiritual benefit; that view may not be true (in the sense of factual), but its beauty reveals deeper truths. 67 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Book 4

Realms of Gold: The Classics in Christian Perspective by Leland Ryken

Throughout history, great literature has been a cohesive force in Western culture. It interprets our experiences and tells us the truth about our fears and longinigs. It is a catalyst to our thinking and an invaluable index to the minds and feelings of people around us. In Realms of Gold Leland Ryken proceeds chronologically through some of the best of the best, from Homer through Shakespeare to Camus, offering not only a taste of the classics, but a framework in which to analyze them. For students studying literature, this book serves as an introduction to the classics as friends; for those who have not read the classics in a long time, it is a motivation to renew delightful acquaintances; for people who already know the classics as intimate friends, it offers the opportunity to renew acquaintance within a Christian context. Read by Ken Myers.

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Christine Rosen, "Virtual Friendship and the New Narcissism"

(from The New Atlantis, Summer 2007)

MARS HILL AUDIO Anthology 6

The Christian Humanism of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

The death of Solzhenitsyn in 2008 provided an opportunity to reassess the life and work of this remarkable figure, whose accomplishment is discussed on this Anthology. Ken Myers talks with Edward E. Ericson, Jr. (Solzhenitsyn and the Modern World, co-editor of The Solzhenitsyn Reader and co-author of The Soul and Barbed Wire), David Aikman (Great Souls: Six Who Changed the Century), and James Pontuso (Solzhenitsyn's Political Thought) about the conditions and experiences that transformed Solzhenitsyn from a committed Communist schoolteacher to a Nobel Prize-winning novelist and the global symbol of heroic resistance to tyranny. One of the main themes emphasized by these three guests is that Solzhenitsyn was not principally concerned with politics, but with human nature and purpose, understood in light of the Christian account of reality. 73 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 24

Alan Jacobs on The Narnian

In this Conversation with Ken Myers, Alan Jacobs, author of The Narnian: The Life and Imagination of C. S. Lewis, discusses a number of Lewis's writings, including The Great Divorce, The Abolition of Man, The Magician's Nephew, That Hideous Strength, and The Pilgrim's Regress. The theme that dominates the discussion is Lewis's view of the imagination, and his deep conviction that the shaping of the conscience requires the training of the imagination. 53 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Book 3

Letters to Ellen by Gilbert Meilaender

What do you tell a young college student about school and life? What advice do you give a daughter (or a son) about vocation, about the importance of commitment, or gratitude? Amid the moral push and pull of modern society, what values and virtues do you most wish to pass on to your children? In this collection of twenty-four imaginary and imaginative letters from a parent to a daughter in college, Gilbert Meilaender imparts sound yet gentle moral instruction to today’s young adults. Highly reminiscent of C. S. Lewis, these letters are a rich mine of sage advice on the Christian moral life woven within the kind, honest, and often humorous language of a loving parent. Meilaender touches on topics ranging from miracles, prayer, faith, and death to the many facets of virtuous living: contentment, fidelity, love, trust, authenticity, humility, hope -- and even studiousness! An ideal resource for personal reflection and group discussion. Read by Laurie McCauley.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 10

Richard Sherlock, "The Secret of Straussianism"

(from Modern Age, Summer 2006)

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 23

Church, State, and Society in Catholic Social Teaching

The history of the development in 19th century Catholic social thought of the idea of society as a spiritual and cultural reality is one of the themes in this Conversation with Dr. Russell Hittinger. In addition to the contribution of Pope Leo XIII and the revival of Thomistic thought to Catholic social thought, Hittinger also discusses the centrality of our ideas about marriage to our thinking about society, the limits of the idea of social contract, the effect of an increasing proportion of Muslims on European social thought, and how modern democracies have abandoned the project of understanding public life in moral terms. 60 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Anthology 5

The Christian Mind of C.S. Lewis

In this Anthology, Ken Myers talks with Clyde Kilby about Lewis’s view of the imagination; with Michael Aeschliman about Lewis’s reasonable distrust of trusting reason too much; with James Como about the rhetorical genius in Lewis’s writing; with Thomas Howard about the deep meaning of Till We Have Faces; and with Gilbert Meilaender about the surprising approach of Lewis’s apologetics. The program concludes with Alan Jacobs’s reading of his 1998 essay, "Lewis at 100." 73 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Book 2

Inheriting Paradise: Meditations on Gardening by Vigen Guroian

The garden is a personal place of retreat and delight and labor for many people. Gardening helps us collect ourselves, much as praying does. For rich and poor -- it makes no difference -- a garden is a place where body and soul are in harmony. In Inheriting Paradise, Vigen Guroian offers an abundant vision of the spiritual life found in the cultivation of God's good creation. Capturing the earthiness and sacramental character of the Christian faith, these uplifting meditations bring together the experience of space and time through the cycle of the seasons in the garden and relate this fundamental experience to the cycle of the church year and the Christian seasons of grace. The tilling of the fresh earth; the sowing of seeds; the harvesting of rhubarb and roses, dillweed and daffodils -- Guroian finds in the garden our most concrete connection with life and God's gracious giving. His personal reflections on this connection offer a compelling entry into Christian spirituality. Read by the author.

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Caitrin Nicol, "Brave New World at 75"

(from The New Atlantis, Spring 2007)

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Hillbilly Thomist: Flannery O'Connor & the Truth of Things

In this Conversation, Ken Myers talks with Susan Srigley about how O’Connor’s perception of reality suffuses her fiction in ways that fit the views of how art works developed by Thomas Aquinas, views often summarized as “sacramental” or “incarnational.” And Ralph Wood discusses O’Connor’s acceptance of the limits placed in our lives by Providence, how limits may be a source of wisdom rather than frustration. 60 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Anthology 4

Sources of Ancient Wisdom

Excerpts from two recent books explain how and why a greater familiarity with the forms of faithfulness of our spiritual predecessors is an important resource for twenty-first century Christians. An excerpt from Reading Scripture with the Church Fathers, by Christopher A. Hall, explains how commentaries on biblical texts from the first six centuries of the Church can provide much-needed perspective for contemporary believers. A chapter from Retrieving the Tradition and Renewing Evangelicalism: A Primer for Suspicious Protestants, by D. H. Williams, summarizes how it is a misreading of Scripture and of the history of Protestantism to insist that revelation and tradition are antithetical concerns of the Church. 96 minutes.

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Yuval Levin, "The Moral Challenge of Modern Science"

(from The New Atlantis, Fall 2006)

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 21

Science and Theology from the Bottom Up: Sir John Polkinghorne on Enriching the Dialogue

In 1979, a much-respected physicist named John Polkinghorne resigned from his position at Cambridge. Just five years earlier he had been honored for his remarkable achievements in mathematical physics (he had been part of the team that discovered the quark) by being appointed a Fellow of the Royal Society. Polkinghorne was departing the environs of this profound and mysterious reflection on the nature of reality for a vocation no less intellectually and personally challenging: the study of theology and service as an Anglican priest. One of the benefits to the public of Polkinghorne’s twin interests in science and theology has been the remarkable series of books he has written since 1983, beginning with The Way the World Is, continuing with the publication of his 1993 Gifford Lectures (published as The Faith of a Physicist: Reflections of a Bottom-Up Thinker) and most recently Science and the Trinity: The Christian Encounter with Reality (Yale). Sir John Polkinghorne talks about the main themes of this book in this Conversation. 54 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Anthology 3

Place, Community, and Memory

What is the price of modern rootlessness? Is it possible to sustain community and local memory in an age when place seems to matter so little? In this Anthology, essays by Gina Bria, Wendell Berry, and Gilbert Meilaender, and the fiction of Bosnian novelist Ivo Andric explore the important ways in which we (and the communities we inhabit) are shaped and sustained by the particular places in which we live. 100 minutes

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 7

Ralph C. Wood, "Rapidly Rises the Morning Tide: An Essay on P. D. James's The Children of Men"

(from Theology Today, vol. 51, no. 20 [July 1994])

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 20

Texts, Sex, and Sanctity: Robert Gagnon on Homosexuality and the Bible

There are few issues within the church more potent than that of homosexuality. Barbara Wheeler, President of Auburn Theological Seminary in New York, has noted that "What we in the churches teach about homosexuality affects the lives of many more people than our own members." In recent years, the debate on this issue has centered on disagreements over the exact nature of biblical teaching concerning sexuality. Dr. Robert Gagnon, Associate Professor of New Testament Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is one of the world's foremost experts on the subject and the author of the critically acclaimed text, The Bible and Homosexual Practice. In this Conversation, Dr. Gagnon talks with Ken Myers about the cultural trends and theological arguments that have shaped the dispute over the past few decades, in the hope of clarifying the answers to many of these complex questions. 72 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Anthology 1

Manners and the Civil Society

Essays by Judith Martin ("Miss Manners"), Gertrude Himmelfarb, Deal Hudson, and James Morris discuss the relationship between manners and morals, and address the way in which the survival of a democratic society depends upon its citizens' respect for one another—respect that is manifested in the symbolic language of manners. 90 minutes

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 6

Louise Cowan, "The Necessity of the Classics"

(from Intercollegiate Review, Fall 2001)

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 19

The Crisis of Islam and the Crisis of the West

Since the events of September 11, 2001, many people in the West have been pursuing crash courses in understanding Islamic belief and history. They have realized the wisdom of acquiring some historical perspective on what appears to be a clash of civilizations. In “The Crisis of Islam and the Crisis of the West,” Bernard Lewis, a Western historian of the Middle East whose work is recognized around the world, helps provide that essential perspective. 50 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 5

David Aikman, "One Word of Truth: A Portrait of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn"

(a Trinity Forum Reading, 1997)

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 18

Human Life, Human Dignity

Modern people tend to ignore questions about the nature and purpose of things while learning to control them more efficiently. But as science and technology offer us the ability to fundamentally transform human nature, we can no longer avoid addressing metaphysical questions. The crisis of our time, many thinkers agree, is one concerning the definition of human nature. In “Human Life, Human Dignity,” Leon Kass outlines what is at stake and sets forth a framework for indispensable discussions surrounding biotechnologies. Kass stresses that we must approach the discussion with reverence and awe and that a major component of the discussion should be the notion of human dignity. Kass recommends that we turn first not to the findings of science and technology, but to the canon of “residual wisdom” in the East and West—found in literary, philosophical, and religious traditions—that vividly depicts human nature in its glories and tragedies. 60 minutes.

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John Pollock, "William Wilberforce: A Man Who Changed His Times"

(a Trinity Forum Reading, 1996)

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 17

Maker of Middle-Earth

While it is not a story set in the twentieth century, Tom Shippey (author of J.R.R. Tolkien: Author of the Century) claims that Lord of the Rings is very much a work of the twentieth century; the momentum of evil sweeps characters into action before they understand the events in which they are involved. Joseph Pearce (author of Tolkien: Man and Myth) defends the Lord of the Rings fantasy genre against those who would claim that realistic fiction is a better vessel for truth; because mythology is stripped of the factual, he explains, it can deal with truth unencumbered and therefore convey its moral more directly. Literary critic Ralph Wood explains why he has been drawn to J.R.R. Tolkien's moral Middle-Earth since his first reading of Lord of the Rings in the 1960s. It is a world ordered by heroism, friendship, loyalty, and hope. These ties alone, he states, enable the hobbits to complete their quest and go where no one else can. 86 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 3

Joshua P. Hochschild, "Globalization: Ancient and Modern"

(from The Intercollegiate Review, Spring 2006)

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 14

Till We Have Faces and the Meaning of Myth

C. S. Lewis’s Till We Have Faces is, in his own words, “a myth retold.” Literary critic Thomas Howard explains that Lewis chose myth as the form through which to wrestle with certain profound ideas and mysteries, for the mythical way of seeing the world is fundamentally opposed to the tenets of modernism for which Lewis had such unrelenting criticism. 50 minutes

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 2

Matthew B. Crawford, "Shop Class as Soulcraft"

(from The New Atlantis, Summer 2006)

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 13

Life Work: On the Christian Idea of Calling

Paul Marshall, author of A Kind of Life Imposed on Man, discusses how society and the Church have understood work throughout history, and what positive ramifications we might expect to see if Christians began to understand their life at work as part of their life in Christ. On part two, Os Guinness, author of The Call, explains how vocation and identity have lost their theological moorings among Christians. 62 minutes

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 1

Roger Kimball, "Leszek Kolakowski and the Anatomy of Totalitarianism"

(from The New Criterion, June 2005)

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 12

Youth Culture & the Church

Mardi Keyes, from the Southborough, Massachusetts branch of L’Abri Fellowship, explains how modern assumptions about the nature of adolescence differ from biblical understanding of human development. She also describes ways in which intergenerational fellowship within the Church can deter many adolescent crises. Then pastor Mark DeVries describes the ideas in his book Family Based Youth Ministry74 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 11

Self, Society, & the Diagnosis of Addiction

Sociologist John Steadman Rice maintains that the concept of codependency is rooted in the tenets of “liberation psychotherapy,” a way of thinking about the self that sees all psychological problems as a function of the restrictions placed on individuals by social institutions, especially by the family. Rice asks what kind of society will result if a critical mass of people are converted to an asocial existence. 48 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 9

The Supreme Court and Abortion

Russell Hittinger, associate professor of theology at Catholic University, talks about the evolution of the Supreme Court’s reasoning about abortion, privacy, and liberty, culminating in the extraordinary views of Planned Parenthood v. Casey.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 8

Bread & the Hungry Soul

Leon Kass, physician, biologist, and professor of philosophy at the University of Chicago, discusses his book The Hungry Soul, in which he explores how the activity of eating provides clues for understanding human nature and helps guide morality and communal life. Then Brother Peter Reinhart talks about the art of breadmaking as a metaphor for spiritual life. 72 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 4

Edge of Life, Edge of Death

Richard Doerflinger recounts the deliberations of the Human Embryo Research Panel, appointed by the National Institutes of Health. On side two, Richard John Neuhaus, editor of First Things magazine, talks about the legitimization of suicide and euthanasia in a society bankrupt of moral and political coherence.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 3

Church, Community, & History

Robert Wuthnow of Princeton University discusses his book Sharing the Journey. He highlights the advantages and dangers of the small-group movement. Then Richard Lints, professor at Gordon-Conwell Seminary, discusses his book The Fabric of Theology, and the need for a return to an understanding of the importance of theology. 84 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 2

The Public Poetry of W. H. Auden

Literary critic Alan Jacobs talks about how W. H. Auden returned to the Church after recognizing that liberal humanism had no answers to the problem of human evil. He also discusses the social themes in Auden's poetry, which avoided utopianism and apocalypticism. 58 minutes.