MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 15

Roger Kimball, "Josef Pieper: Leisure and Its Discontents"

(from The New Criterion, January 1999)

Long before Alasdair MacIntyre or Stanley Hauerwas were reminding us of the significance of historic teaching about virtue, Josef Pieper (1904-1997) was writing confidently about virtue and the virtues. Pieper is best known today for his 1952 book, Leisure, the Basis of Culture. When the book was published, The New York Times enthused "Pieper's message for us is plain. . . . The idolatry of the machine, the worship of mindless know-how, the infantile cult of youth and the common mind — all this points to our peculiar leadership in the drift toward the slave society. . . . Pieper's profound insights are impressive and even formidable."

While the Times may not be quite as excited about Pieper today, we're pleased to present a primer on Pieper's ideas in our latest Audio Reprint: "Josef Pieper: Leisure and Its Discontents." This 1999 essay by Roger Kimball introduces listeners to Pieper's arguments about the nature of leisure, which are claims about the nature of philosophy and of human well-being. The article was originally published in The New Criterion, where Roger Kimball is editor and publisher. Read by Ken Myers. 34 minutes

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  • Description
    "Josef Pieper: Leisure and Its Discontents" by Roger Kimball. Read by Ken Myers.