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Church & Culture

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 150

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Guests on Volume 150: David I. Smith on how Christian schools can make wise decisions about the use of educational technologies; Eric O. Jacobsen on how living in a world mediated by screens encourages loneliness; Matthew Crawford on how the “promise” of self-driving cars threatens the capacities of agency enabled by driving; Andrew Davison on how the metaphysical concept of participation helps us understand God’s relationship with Creation (and with us); Joseph E. Davis on the medicalization of suffering and the reductionism promoted by neuroscience; and Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung on the wisdom of the tradition of understanding faithfulness and morality in the framework of virtues, vices, and spiritual disciplines.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 149

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Guests on Volume 149: Dru Johnson on how rituals serve to shape our understanding of God and Creation; Steven L. Porter on the causes and consequences of the loss of confidence in the rationality of morality; Reinhard Hütter on why Christian ethics must be ordered by Christian eschatology; Matthew Levering on the theological and philosophical concerns of Hans Urs von Balthasar; David Lyle Jeffrey on the influence of the Bible on English poetry; and Christopher Phillips on the cultural and spiritual effects of hymns and the “thingness” of hymnals.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 148

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Guests on Volume 148: Steven D. Smith on how a modern “religion without God” characterizes what alleges to be secular neutrality; Willem Vanderburg on the costs of forgetting the unity and interdependence of Creation; Jeffrey Bilbro on lessons from Wendell Berry’s poetry, fiction, and essays about the virtues that characterize people who foster sustainable cultures; Emma Mason on the theological concerns evident in the poetry of Christina Rossetti; Alison Milbank on how the Gothic literary genre in England expressed ambivalence about the effects of the Reformation; and Timothy Larsen on George MacDonald and Victorian earnestness about faith and anxieties about doubt.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 27

Stephen Gurney, "John Henry Newman: The Poetics of Devotion"

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(From Modern Age, Fall 2000.)

English professor, Stephen Gurney, takes a closer look at John Henry Newman’s Parochial and Plain Sermons, which Newman preached at Oxford between 1828 and 1841 before his conversion to Roman Catholicism. John Henry Newman is best known for his role in England's Oxford Movement, a movement which — as Gurney describes — “fused the pre-Reformational spirit of the Catholic Church with the poetic richness of English Romanticism.” In this essay, Stephen Gurney shows how in his sermons, Newman draws the listener in through the craft and beauty of his prose — and, for those who heard his sermons, Newman’s entrancing voice — while nonetheless removing himself from the spotlight in order to convey his listeners to the True Presence of Christ. With a delicate and sophisticated balance of subjective devotion and sacramental ecclesiology, Newman’s sermons invite the whole person to participate in a spiritual journey that ends in an encounter with the Divine. $2

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 145

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Guests on Volume 145: David I. Smith, on Christian teaching as a set of practices that accords with Christian content; Bruce Hindmarsh, on the rise of the conversion narrative in early Evangelicalism; Jason Baxter, on the psychological subtlety in Dante’s Divine Comedy; John Fea, on the entanglement of American evangelicals and politics; Laurie Gagne, on the spiritual longing of French philosopher Simone Weil; and Matthew O'Donovan, on singing Renaissance polyphony with Stile Antico.

Areopagus Lecture 6

D. C. Schindler: “For Freedom Set Free”

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Philosopher D. C. Schindler discusses the Christian notion of religious liberty as a synthesis of the Jewish, Roman, and Greek traditions. In the Jewish tradition, one receives a theological understanding of freedom understood as freedom from bondage and from sin in order to more fully enter into a loving covenant with God. In the Roman tradition, freedom exists in relation to one’s membership within a polis and is established through legal codes. This objective political presence is internalized and personalized through the education of virtuous citizens. And in the Greek tradition, freedom is understood in relation to nature, on the one hand through membership in a tribe by kinship, and on the other hand, through participation in the Good, which is at the source of all being. Christianity, argues Schindler, is precisely the “receiving, healing, and transforming [of these] three distinct traditions” and Christian freedom is their “flourishing integration.” $4

Areopagus Lecture 5

Alison Milbank: Imaginative Apologetics beyond C. S. Lewis

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In Alison Milbank's Areopagus Lecture, titled “Imaginative Apologetics beyond C. S. Lewis,” Milbank offers an approach to defending the Christian faith that restores the imagination as a faculty inseparable from reason. By using C. S. Lewis as a conversation partner — along with Owen Barfield, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, G. K. Chesterton, and Novalis — Milbank explores how the imagination is not just an instrumental means to an objective end, but the ecstatic and receptive means by which we participate in what is True and Real. $4.

MARS HILL AUDIO Book 8

For the Life of the World by Alexander Schmemann

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MARS HILL AUDIO presents the first available audiobook of Fr. Alexander Schmemann’s classic work on theology and liturgy, For the Life of the World: Sacraments and Orthodoxy. Fr. Schmemann begins his essay into the sacraments of the Church with the observation that man is a hungry being and that the world is presented to him as his food. Man must eat in order to have life. Read by Ken Myers. $15.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 141

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Guests on Volume 141: Grant Wythoff, on the technophiliac obsessions of Hugo Gernsback, the geeky midwife of modern science fiction; Susanna Lee, on how the hard-boiled protagonists of crime fiction in the 1930s and 40s were replaced by more nihilistic tough guys in the 1950s and 60s; Gerald R. McDermott, on how the work of theologian E. L. Mascall can expose blind spots in contemporary Christian thought; Carlos Eire, on how and why religion became “interiorized” in the wake of the reformations of the sixteenth century; Kelly Kapic, on theology’s use of experience and why the Incarnation is the ground of Christian hope; and James Matthew Wilson, on the beauty of truth and goodness, and on the necessity of cultivating “intellectual vision.”

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 30

Rebecca DeYoung on Vainglory, the Forgotten Vice

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In this conversation, philosopher Rebecca DeYoung explains how the language of vices speaks to patterns or narratives in our lives in a way that is distinct from “original sin” and from “sin as moments or acts of rule-breaking.” Drawing from the wisdom of the Desert Fathers, DeYoung describes vainglory and the other “deadly sins” as capital vices from which more vices may materialize. 56 minutes $6.

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