Topics

Church & Culture

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 141

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 141: Grant Wythoff, on the technophiliac obsessions of Hugo Gernsback, the geeky midwife of modern science fiction; Susanna Lee, on how the hard-boiled protagonists of crime fiction in the 1930s and 40s were replaced by more nihilistic tough guys in the 1950s and 60s; Gerald R. McDermott, on how the work of theologian E. L. Mascall can expose blind spots in contemporary Christian thought; Carlos Eire, on how and why religion became “interiorized” in the wake of the reformations of the sixteenth century; Kelly Kapic, on theology’s use of experience and why the Incarnation is the ground of Christian hope; and James Matthew Wilson, on the beauty of truth and goodness, and on the necessity of cultivating “intellectual vision.”

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 30

Rebecca DeYoung on Vainglory, the Forgotten Vice

Available for mp3 purchase
In this conversation, philosopher Rebecca DeYoung explains how the language of vices speaks to patterns or narratives in our lives in a way that is distinct from “original sin” and from “sin as moments or acts of rule-breaking.” Drawing from the wisdom of the Desert Fathers, DeYoung describes vainglory and the other “deadly sins” as capital vices from which more vices may materialize. 56 minutes

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 29

Brand Luther: Andrew Pettegree on Martin Luther, Printing, and the Making of the Reformation

Available for mp3 purchase
It is often noted that Martin Luther’s Reformation could never have advanced the way it did without the technology of the printing industry. While the coincidence of Luther and the printing press undoubtedly contributed to the Reformation’s rapid spread, the printing world at the time of Luther was largely under the patronage of the Catholic church, and it was not inevitable, according to Andrew Pettegree, that “print would become an agent of insurrection.” In his book, Brand Luther, historian Andrew Pettegree shows how Luther’s facility for writing in German and his intuitive business sense not only spread ideas and incited controversy, but completely transformed the distribution model of the printing industry. 56 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 140

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 140: Matthew Rubery, on the history of the “talking book,” and on how reading aloud differs from listening to it being read; James Herrick, on the “post-human” aspirations of the transhumanist movement, and how its plausibility is established by stories; Jack Baker & Jeffrey Bilbro, on lessons that universities should heed from Wendell Berry’s essays, poetry, and fiction about commitment to living in a place; Timothy Gloege, on the influence of business methods on 20th-century evangelicalism through the shaping of Moody Bible Institute; David Hollinger, on how the sons and daughters of mid-20th-century missionaries to Asia came back to the U.S. and influenced government, journalism, and the academy; and Barrett Fisher, on the themes of the challenge of faithfulness as presented in Shusaku Endo’s Silence and in Martin Scorsese’s film version.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 139

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 139: W. Bradford Littlejohn, on post-Reformation debates about the meaning of freedom; Simon Oliver, on how the doctrine of creation ex nihilo is a doctrine about God (and not just the origin of the universe); Matthew Levering, on the necessity of God’s wisdom in the doctrine of creation; Esther Lightcap Meek, on Michael Polanyi’s case that making contact with reality is a process of discovery; Paul Tyson, on resisting our modern assumptions about knowledge in favor of knowledge that is grounded in wonder; and David Fagerberg, on acquiring a liturgical posture in everyday life.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 138

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 138: John Milbank, on why politics needs to recognize the human soul (and what happens when it doesn’t); Adrian Pabst, on the “metacrisis” of liberalism; Glenn Olsen, on Christopher Dawson’s understanding of religion and culture; Rupert Shortt, on how scientism misunderstands God and divine action; Oliver O’Donovan, on the significance of love, community, and friendship as ethical and eschatological categories; and David Bentley Hart, on the hazards and delights of translating the New Testament.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 17

Robert W. Jenson, "How the World Lost Its Story"

Available for mp3 purchase
(from First Things, October 1993)

In this article, theologian Robert W. Jenson describes how a postmodern world is characterized by the loss of a conviction that we inhabit a “narratable world” that exists coherently outside of ourselves. Although modernity — as opposed to postmodernity — presupposed in its arts and philosophy this narratable world, it did so while at the same time discarding the Judeo-Christian framework that enabled such a supposition in the first place. Increasingly, as the arts prefigured and now as the general culture at large displays, the experience of and confidence in such a coherent narrative has broken down into fragments. How then is the Church to respond to a world that has lost its story? In Jenson's words: “If the church does not find her hearers antecedently inhabiting a narratable world, then the church must herself be that world.” Read by Ken Myers. 40 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 136

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 136: Thomas Albert Howard, on the history of commemorating the Reformation; Mark Noll, on how the Reformers would want to be remembered; Andrew Pettegree, on how Martin Luther transformed the printing industry; Peter Leithart, on the biblical basis for the unity of the Church; Norm Klassen, on the political theology implicit in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales; James Litton, on the life and work of hymnologist, Erik Routley; and Joseph O’Brien, on the neglected literary achievements of J. F. Powers.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 135

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 135: Bob Cutillo, on the importance of understanding health as a gift; Hans Boersma, on recovering the patristic recognition of the sacramental presence of Christ in the Old Testatment; Dana Gioia, on the devout life and distinctive poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins; Matthew Levering, on the history of proofs of God’s existence, and what we learn about reason when we reason about God; Bruce Gordon, on his “biography” of John Calvin’s Institutes of the Christian Religion; and Markus Rathey, on the dramatic and liturgical character of the major vocal works of Johann Sebastian Bach.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 134

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 134: Chris Armstrong, on what C. S. Lewis knew (and we need to know) about the culture and faith of medieval Christianity; Grevel Lindop, on the unique poetic imagination of poet, novelist, and theologian Charles Williams, “the third Inkling”; Michael Martin, on how the experience of Beauty in Creation and art can enable an encounter with divine Wisdom; William T. Cavanaugh, on why Christians should think about economics theologically, not just as a science or an ethical discipline; Philip Turner, on why Christian ethics has the health of the Church at its center, not just personal obedience or social justice; Gisela Kreglinger, on wine, the culture of wine, and the superabundant goodness of God made manifest in the gift of wine.

Pages