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Church & Culture

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 26

Guests on Volume 26: James Gilbert, on how science and religion negotiate for public respect; William Everdell, on the meaning and method of modernism; David Walsh, on the genius of liberal democracy; Alan Jacobs, on The Dictionary of Global Culture and "Real" Global Culture; Jeffrey Meikle, on American Plastic: A Cultural History; Jeffrey Burton Russell, on A History of Heaven: The Singing Silence; Roger Lundin, on Harry Mulisch's novel, The Discovery of Heaven; and Gordon Kreplin, on music, craft, gift, and beauty.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 25

Guests on Volume 25: Douglas Groothuis, on The Soul in Cyberspace; Harold Bloom, on the Gnostic view of creation and fall; Gilbert Meilaender, on the outlines of a distinctively Christian bioethics; Susan Bergman, on martyrs and the meaning of suffering; Paul Marshall, on international persecution of Christians; George Marsden, on The Outrageous Idea of Christian Scholarship; Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, on divorce as a democratic institution; and Leonard Payton, on The Pilgrim's Progress by Ralph Vaughn Williams.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 20

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Guests on Volume 20: Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, on the benefits of single-sex education, and the confusion of "elite" feminism; Robert D. Richardson, Jr., on why the work of Ralph Waldo Emerson continues to attract certain religious seekers; Roger Lundin, on Emerson's assertion of alternatives to Christianity, and how they have seeped under the American cultural skin; Wilfred McClay, on individualism and collectivism in American society; Andrew A. Tadie, on learning to love and learn from G. K. Chesterton; Robert Jenson, on why the life of the mind matters to the Church, and how it should take shape in the world; Ted Prescott, on why artists have been attracted to abstraction, and what viewers should look for in abstract art; and Ted Libbey, on Haydn's The Creation.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 17

Guests on Volume 17: Alan Jacobs, on the seafaring fiction of novelist Patrick O'Brian; Barry Sanders, on the deeper dynamics of literacy; Mark Slouka, on bizarre Gnostic temptations in cyberspace; Alan Ehrenhalt, on how valuing choice hurts community; Geoffrey T. Holtz, on twenty-somethings and the shape of family life; Mardi Keyes, on dubious assumptions about the nature of adolescence; W. Bradford Wilcox, on tradition and belief; Glenn Loury, on race and relationships; and John Hodges, on the influence of Russian Orthodoxy in the music of John Tavener.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 16

Guests on Volume 16: Philip Cushman, on the cultural history of psychotherapy in America; R. Laurence Moore, on religious disestablishment and the growth imperative; Keith J. Pavlischek, on the shrinking foundations supporting religious liberty; Dean M. Kelley, on the government's deadly interpretation of the Branch Davidian religion; Alan Jacobs, on the storytelling powers of neurologist Oliver Sacks; Kathleen Murphy, on Ingmar Bergman's films and the lack of seriousness in contemporary film; Michael Allen Gillespie, on the medieval (and theological) sources of nihilism; Robert Wilken, on similarities between the early Church's culture and our own; and Francis Crociata, on the music of American composer Leo Sowerby.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 15

Guests on Volume 15: Jean Bethke Elshtain, on Democracy on Trial; Barry Alan Shain, on communalism in early American Protestantism; Christopher Wolfe, on the moral basis for strong local government; A. G. Mojtabai, on how contemporary novelists ignore religion; Robert Pinsky, on the challenges of translating Dante's Inferno; Suzanne Wolfe, on choosing books for children; Amy Waldman, on the ersatz community of TV shopping networks; Mark Crispin Miller, on the dehumanized feeling so common in modern advertising; Ted Prescott, on the Whitney Biennial, Bruce Nauman, and the "Mutant Materials" exhibit; and Edward Rothstein, on the inner meaning of music and mathematics.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 14

Guests on Volume 14: Thomas Cahill, on the story of How the Irish Saved Civilization; Mark Noll, on the history of Evangelical anti-intellectualism; Paul Davies, on God and time; William Lane Craig, on problems in the thinking of Paul Davies; Alan Jacobs, on the moral dumbing down of Louisa May Alcott's novel in the movie version of Little Women; Drew Trotter, on the moral indifference of filmmaker Quentin Tarantino; Cornelius Plantinga, Jr., on the need for a recovery of the meaning of sin; Eugene Genovese, on learning from the Southern Agrarians; and Ted Libbey, on J. S. Bach's St. John Passion.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 8

Bread & the Hungry Soul

Available for mp3 purchase
Leon Kass, physician, biologist, and professor of philosophy at the University of Chicago, discusses his book The Hungry Soul: Eating and the Perfecting of Our Nature, in which he explores how the activity of eating provides clues for understanding human nature and helps guide morality and communal life. Then Brother Peter Reinhart talks about the art of breadmaking as a metaphor for spiritual life. 72 minutes. $6.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 12

Guests on Volume 12: George Weigel, on posturing and prudence in pro-life politics; Don Eberly, on the inability of politics to cure cultural problems; David Wells, on recapturing a "weighty" understanding of God; Alan Jacobs, on the Christian conviction of poet Christina Rossetti; Ken Myers, on instances of naturalistic positivism in recent science journalism; Nancy Pearcey, on misunderstanding the history of science; Leon Kass, on the deeper meaning of eating; and John Hodges, on J. S. Bach's Christmas Oratorio.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 11

Guests on Volume 11: Richard Skolnik, on Baseball and the Pursuit of Innocence: A Fresh Look at the Old Ball Game; Laura Nash, on the influence of religious faith in the marketplace; Dick Keyes, on heroism, character, and the imitation of Christ; Douglas LeBlanc, on musings on mortality by the Crash Test Dummies; Ken Myers, on Michael Moore's TV Nation and terminal irony in prime time; Gene Edward Veith, on communicating truth to a cynical age; Alan Jacobs, on Chinua Achebe and the dilemma of living between two cultures; and Ted Libbey, on Beethoven's Missa Solemnis.

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