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MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 31

Guests on Volume 31: David Orgon Coolidge, on Dale v. Boy Scouts, which requires the Scouts to admit homosexuals; James Twitchell, on how American culture has eliminated shame from our experience; Thomas Frank, on how advertisers came to link their products with the idea of self-fulfillment; Keith Windschuttle, on the killing of the discipline of history; Wilfred McClay, on history and academic advancement; David Harlan, on history as moral reflection; Wilfred McClay, on historian David Harlan; and Gilbert Meilaender, on C. S. Lewis's self-denying gospel.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 13

Life Work: On the Christian Idea of Calling

Available for mp3 purchase
Paul Marshall, author of A Kind of Life Imposed on Man, discusses how society and the Church have understood work throughout history, and what positive ramifications we might expect to see if Christians began to understand their life at work as part of their life in Christ. On part two, Os Guinness, author of The Call, explains how vocation and identity have lost their theological moorings among Christians. 62 minutes $6.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 30

Guests on Volume 30: Glenn Stanton, on the health of marriages and the health of society; Caroline J. Simon, on love, destiny, and imagination; Paul Marshall, on the theological meaning of vocation; David Lowenthal, on American Constitutional design and the need for virtue; Reinder Van Til, on Lost Daughters: Recovered Memory Therapy and the People It Hurts; John Ellis, on Literature Lost: Social Agendas and the Corruption of the Humanities; and Clyde Kilby, on C. S. Lewis and the roles of reason and imagination.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 27

Guests on Volume 27: John Horgan, on whether or not we're coming to the end of the age of science; Keith Devlin, on the limits of logic; Robert Kanigel, on modern industrial efficiency; Kate Campbell, on music and memories; Patrick Samway, on Walker Percy: A Life; J. Budziszewski, on tolerance and the law "written on the heart"; Jeff Johnson, on his recordings with flutist Brian Dunning; and Stephen Lawhead, on retelling the Arthurian legends.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 21

Guests on Volume 21: James Twitchell, on ways advertising shapes (and thins out) American culture; Lynne Cheney, on the politics of ideas in higher education; Peter Berkowitz, on how Friedrich Nietzsche was torn between certainty of the "death of God" and belief in the divinity of truth; Ron Hansen, on what makes good fiction; Frederica Mathewes-Green, on "The America We Seek," an important pro-life manifesto; Robert Higgs, on how professional sports have lost a sense of play; Terry Eastland, on why affirmative action is ending; and Ted Libbey, on Brahms's German Requiem.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 19

Guests on Volume 19: Robert Goodman, on economic and moral effects of state-sponsored gambling; Ted Prescott, on modernist artists Brancusi and Mondrian, and why they were attracted to abstraction; Daniel Chirot, on how resentful nationalism and utopian ideologies combine to form Modern Tyrants; Edward Ericson, Jr., on books by and about Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn; Alan Jacobs, on the portrayal of morals and manners in films based on Jane Austen novels; Charles Sykes, on why schools have abandoned the life of the mind; Allan C. Carlson, on what's wrong with Hillary Rodham Clinton's It Takes a Village; and Thomas Connolly, on music and cosmic coherence.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 18

Guests on Volume 18: Leigh Eric Schmidt, on how the marketplace has shaped American celebration of the holidays; John Patrick Diggins, on how pragmatism fails to offer a coherent way of understanding of the world; Joseph Frank, on moral themes in the fiction of Fyodor Dostoevsky; Thomas Howard, on the supernatural thrillers of Charles Williams; Ken Myers, on Marsalis on Music, a book and a video series on music appreciation; Deal Hudson, on the themes of family in the work of Sigrid Undset, author of Kristin Lavransdatter and The Master of Hestviken; George McKenna, on how President Lincoln might have fought abortion; and Ted Libbey, on master English composer Henry Purcell.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 16

Guests on Volume 16: Philip Cushman, on the cultural history of psychotherapy in America; R. Laurence Moore, on religious disestablishment and the growth imperative; Keith J. Pavlischek, on the shrinking foundations supporting religious liberty; Dean M. Kelley, on the government's deadly interpretation of the Branch Davidian religion; Alan Jacobs, on the storytelling powers of neurologist Oliver Sacks; Kathleen Murphy, on Ingmar Bergman's films and the lack of seriousness in contemporary film; Michael Allen Gillespie, on the medieval (and theological) sources of nihilism; Robert Wilken, on similarities between the early Church's culture and our own; and Francis Crociata, on the music of American composer Leo Sowerby.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 15

Guests on Volume 15: Jean Bethke Elshtain, on Democracy on Trial; Barry Alan Shain, on communalism in early American Protestantism; Christopher Wolfe, on the moral basis for strong local government; A. G. Mojtabai, on how contemporary novelists ignore religion; Robert Pinsky, on the challenges of translating Dante's Inferno; Suzanne Wolfe, on choosing books for children; Amy Waldman, on the ersatz community of TV shopping networks; Mark Crispin Miller, on the dehumanized feeling so common in modern advertising; Ted Prescott, on the Whitney Biennial, Bruce Nauman, and the "Mutant Materials" exhibit; and Edward Rothstein, on the inner meaning of music and mathematics.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 13

Guests on Volume 13: Richard Noll, on the influence of paganism in the life and thought of C. G. Jung; Armand Nicholi, on Sigmund Freud's religious longings; Jackson Lears, on how advertising detaches us from the world; Alan Jacobs, on Anne Rice and the popularity of her vampire novels; Ken Myers, on reporting about religion; Rand & Robyn Miller, on MYST, the bestselling computer game; Sven Birkerts, on how the act of reading assists in building self-understanding; Stephen G. Smith, on his magazine Civilization, produced in cooperation with the Library of Congress; and Deal Hudson, on the return of melody in modern music.

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