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Education

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 21

Guests on Volume 21: James Twitchell, on ways advertising shapes (and thins out) American culture; Lynne Cheney, on the politics of ideas in higher education; Peter Berkowitz, on how Friedrich Nietzsche was torn between certainty of the "death of God" and belief in the divinity of truth; Ron Hansen, on what makes good fiction; Frederica Mathewes-Green, on "The America We Seek," an important pro-life manifesto; Robert Higgs, on how professional sports have lost a sense of play; Terry Eastland, on why affirmative action is ending; and Ted Libbey, on Brahms's German Requiem.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 20

Guests on Volume 20: Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, on the benefits of single-sex education, and the confusion of "elite" feminism; Robert D. Richardson, Jr., on why the work of Ralph Waldo Emerson continues to attract certain religious seekers; Roger Lundin, on Emerson's assertion of alternatives to Christianity, and how they have seeped under the American cultural skin; Wilfred McClay, on individualism and collectivism in American society; Andrew A. Tadie, on learning to love and learn from G. K. Chesterton; Robert Jenson, on why the life of the mind matters to the Church, and how it should take shape in the world; Ted Prescott, on why artists have been attracted to abstraction, and what viewers should look for in abstract art; and Ted Libbey, on Haydn's The Creation.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 19

Guests on Volume 19: Robert Goodman, on economic and moral effects of state-sponsored gambling; Ted Prescott, on modernist artists Brancusi and Mondrian, and why they were attracted to abstraction; Daniel Chirot, on how resentful nationalism and utopian ideologies combine to form Modern Tyrants; Edward Ericson, Jr., on books by and about Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn; Alan Jacobs, on the portrayal of morals and manners in films based on Jane Austen novels; Charles Sykes, on why schools have abandoned the life of the mind; Allan C. Carlson, on what's wrong with Hillary Rodham Clinton's It Takes a Village; and Thomas Connolly, on music and cosmic coherence.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 17

Guests on Volume 17: Alan Jacobs, on the seafaring fiction of novelist Patrick O'Brian; Barry Sanders, on the deeper dynamics of literacy; Mark Slouka, on bizarre Gnostic temptations in cyberspace; Alan Ehrenhalt, on how valuing choice hurts community; Geoffrey T. Holtz, on twenty-somethings and the shape of family life; Mardi Keyes, on dubious assumptions about the nature of adolescence; W. Bradford Wilcox, on tradition and belief; Glenn Loury, on race and relationships; and John Hodges, on the influence of Russian Orthodoxy in the music of John Tavener.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 15

Guests on Volume 15: Jean Bethke Elshtain, on Democracy on Trial; Barry Alan Shain, on communalism in early American Protestantism; Christopher Wolfe, on the moral basis for strong local government; A. G. Mojtabai, on how contemporary novelists ignore religion; Robert Pinsky, on the challenges of translating Dante's Inferno; Suzanne Wolfe, on choosing books for children; Amy Waldman, on the ersatz community of TV shopping networks; Mark Crispin Miller, on the dehumanized feeling so common in modern advertising; Ted Prescott, on the Whitney Biennial, Bruce Nauman, and the "Mutant Materials" exhibit; and Edward Rothstein, on the inner meaning of music and mathematics.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 13

Guests on Volume 13: Richard Noll, on the influence of paganism in the life and thought of C. G. Jung; Armand Nicholi, on Sigmund Freud's religious longings; Jackson Lears, on how advertising detaches us from the world; Alan Jacobs, on Anne Rice and the popularity of her vampire novels; Ken Myers, on reporting about religion; Rand & Robyn Miller, on MYST, the bestselling computer game; Sven Birkerts, on how the act of reading assists in building self-understanding; Stephen G. Smith, on his magazine Civilization, produced in cooperation with the Library of Congress; and Deal Hudson, on the return of melody in modern music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 11

Guests on Volume 11: Richard Skolnik, on Baseball and the Pursuit of Innocence: A Fresh Look at the Old Ball Game; Laura Nash, on the influence of religious faith in the marketplace; Dick Keyes, on heroism, character, and the imitation of Christ; Douglas LeBlanc, on musings on mortality by the Crash Test Dummies; Ken Myers, on Michael Moore's TV Nation and terminal irony in prime time; Gene Edward Veith, on communicating truth to a cynical age; Alan Jacobs, on Chinua Achebe and the dilemma of living between two cultures; and Ted Libbey, on Beethoven's Missa Solemnis.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 9

Guests on Volume 9: William Bennett, on the power of stories in the cultivation of virtue; Mark Juergensmeyer, on religious nationalism and the possibilities of new cold wars; Ed Knippers, on the spiritual reasons for the vivid physicality of his paintings of Biblical narratives; Joshua Gamson, on Claims to Fame: Celebrity in Contemporary America; Ken Myers, on "attitude" and violence in pop culture and on the streets; Richard Doerflinger, on the ethical numbness of the NIH Embryo Research Panel; Richard John Neuhaus, on assisted suicide and the chilling prospects of modern eugenics; and Ted Libbey, on making an initial approach to classical music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 8

Guests on Volume 8: Alan Jacobs, on novelist Iris Murdoch and how fiction encourages reflection in the moral life; Gilbert Meilaender, on "Random Acts of Kindness," cultivating virtue, and the meaning of kindness; Richard Lints, on The Fabric of Theology: A Prolegomenon to Evangelical Theology; Lynn Neary, on religion reporting's rebirth in the mainstream media; Ken Myers, on Recent Periodicals; James Davison Hunter, on the superficiality of journalism; Howard Rheingold, on the viability of "Virtual Community"; and Dominic Aquila, on Estonian composer Arvo Pärt's Te Deum.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 7

Guests on Volume 7: Dean Kenyon, on his fight for academic freedom at San Francisco State University; Phillip Johnson, on scientists' intolerance toward theories about intelligent design; Jane Metcalfe, on technology and community; John Hodges, on sacred music by Ralph Vaughan Williams; Dominic Aquila, on the late cultural critic, Christopher Lasch; Robert Royal, on "Reinventing the American People," multiculturalism and the shaping of national identity; Ted Prescott, on the British realist painter Lucian Freud; and Drew Trotter, on Steven Spielberg's Oscar-winning Schindler's List.

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