Topics

Ethics

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 70

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 70: W. Wesley McDonald, on the significance of Russell Kirk’s themes of the "permanent things" and "the moral imagination"; C. Ben Mitchell, on law, wisdom, and the possibilities of pastoral guidance on bioethical decisions, and on why and how the Church should be more welcoming toward the elderly; Carl Elliott, on the medical industry’s move from healing to enhancing self-esteem and idenity formation; Richard Weikart, on the rise of "evolutionary ethics," the embrace toward ethical relativism, and the slide toward eugenics; Christine Rosen, on how and why early 20th century American religious leaders encouraged eugenics in the name of moral progress; and Dana Gioia, on the decline in literary reading in America and on the cultural loss it signifies.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 66

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 66: Leon Kass, on how various biotechnologies promise to fulfill certain legitimate human desires in illegitimate ways, and on how new technologies have changed the assumptions many people have about their children; Nigel Cameron, on why American churches have been negligent in promoting robust thinking about the current bioethical crisis; Susan Wise Bauer, on how adults can acquire many of the benefits of a classical education long after leaving school by reading wisely and well; Esther Lightcap Meek, on belief, doubt, certainty, authority, and how knowledge (of God and other matters) is acquired, sustained, and properly recognized; John Shelton Lawrence, on how John Wayne, Clint Eastwood, Superman, and the governor of California all embody a great American myth; and Ralph C. Wood, on the disappointing discrepancies between Peter Jackson's films and J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 64

Guests on Volume 64: Paul Berman, on the links between Islamism and other totalitarian utopias; Jean Bethke Elshtain, on justice and the vocation of government, and on maintaining a sense of the holy; Hadley Arkes, on natural rights and "inadvertant treason," and on the rise of a new jurisprudence in Griswold v. Connecticut and Roe v. Wade; Ralph C. Wood, on the place of the seven virtues in J. R. R. Tolkien's vision of the moral life in The Lord of the Rings; and Jeremy Begbie, on what we learn about time, theology, and the structure of creation from the experience of music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 61

Guests on Volume 61: Ian Dowbiggin, on the history of the “right to die”movement; Arthur J. Dyck, on Life's Worth: The Case against Assisted Suicide; Daniel Dreisbach, on the building of Jefferson's "wall of separation"; Michael L. Peterson, on the elements of a Christian philosophy of education; Stephen Schwartz, on the differences between Balkan Muslims and those of Saudi Arabia; Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, on how young people are taught to invest in themselves rather than family or community; and John H. Timmerman, on the person and poetry of Jane Kenyon and on how she lived and worked.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 60

Guests on Volume 60: David Naugle, on the origins of the term "worldview," and the spiritual and religious significance of "worldview thinking" for Christians; D. G. Hart, on the distinctions between evangelicalism and confessional Protestantism; Dermot Quinn, on the historical wisdom of Christopher Dawson, and the skepticism of contemporary historians; Russell Hittinger, on how a right to privacy emerged and evolved in American constitutional law and on how a landmark federal court decision addressed physician-assisted suicide; Leon Kass, on why a commitment to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness is not enough to protect human dignity; and James Howard Kunstler, on how designing spaces that respect cars but not pedestrians has made so much of America unlovable if not unlivable.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 18

Human Nature, Human Dignity

Available for mp3 purchase
Modern people tend to ignore questions about the nature and purpose of things while learning to control them more efficiently. But as science and technology offer us the ability to fundamentally transform human nature, we can no longer avoid addressing metaphysical questions. The crisis of our time, many thinkers agree, is one concerning the definition of human nature. In “Human Life, Human Dignity,” Leon Kass outlines what is at stake and sets forth a framework for indispensable discussions surrounding biotechnologies. Kass stresses that we must approach the discussion with reverence and awe and that a major component of the discussion should be the notion of human dignity. Kass recommends that we turn first not to the findings of science and technology, but to the canon of “residual wisdom” in the East and West—found in literary, philosophical, and religious traditions—that vividly depicts human nature in its glories and tragedies. 60 minutes. $6.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 58

Guests on Volume 58: Hubert Dreyfus, on the limits of artificial intelligence; Francis Fukuyama, on biotechnology and the arrogance of "participatory evolution"; Gordon Preece, on the underlying assumption of Peter Singer's ethical ideas; Gijs van Hensbergen, on the marvelous architecture of Antoni Gaudí; Ted Prescott, on why the idea of beauty was rejected in the 20th century, and how it is returning; and Bradley J. Birzer, on the mythic roots of Middle Earth in J. R. R. Tolkien's The Silmarillion and on Tolkien's idea of myth.

MARS HILL AUDIO Book 5

A Visit to Vanity Fair: Moral Essays on the Present Age by Alan Jacobs

Available for mp3 purchase
Alan Jacobs, literary critic and professor of humanities at Baylor University, has been a regular guest on the MARS HILL AUDIO Journal since 1993, discussing subjects ranging from the problem of literary sentimentalism (as in The Bridges of Madison County), and the delights of historical fiction (as in seafaring narratives of Patrick O'Brian) to the repulsive attraction of the vampire novels of Anne Rice. In his most recent book, A Visit to Vanity Fair: Moral Essays on the Present Age, Jacobs displays a similar range of breadth and depth, as well as significant portions of wit and grace. Included are essays on the mystery of true friendship (Friendship and Its Discontents), the severing of theology and literature (Preachers without Poetry), and the desire to know the future (Dowsing in Scripture). Read by the author. $15

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 51

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 51: Nigel Cameron, on the challenges of bioethics and how Christians ignore them; David Blankenhorn, on the public meaning of marriage and the private sector and the family; Robert Wuthnow, on creativity and faith; Mortimer Adler, on philosophical theism and How to Think about God; Roger Lundin, on the vision of William Blake; Dana Gioia, on the place of poetry and the way words work; Mary Midgley, on the ways science explains reality; and Ted Libbey, on the life and music of Edmund Rubbra.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 50

Guests on Volume 50: Stanley Carlson-Thies, on the theology of "charitable choice"; Bruce S. Thornton, on the loss of ends and the exultation of appetite in the academy; A. J. Conyers, on the origins of the modern view of tolerance (and of Big Government); Stanton L. Jones, on various configurations of science, morality, and homosexuality; Arthur Holmes, on the history of Christianity and education in the liberal arts; Carson Holloway, on All Shook Up: Music, Passion, and Politics; Ted Prescott, on the popular paintings and the prophetic claims of Thomas Kinkade; and Glenn C. Arbery, on the achievement of form in literature.

Pages