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Music & The Arts

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 144

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 144: Jonathan McIntosh on the influence of St. Thomas Aquinas’s metaphysical ideas on the work of J. R. R. Tolkien; Kevin Vost on the history of thinking about friendship in Patristic and Medieval Christian thought; Malcolm Guite on wisdom from Samuel Taylor Coleridge about reason and the imagination; R. David Cox on the influence of the Virginia Episcopalian tradition on the religious life of Robert E. Lee; Grant Brodrecht on why Civil War-era evangelicals in the North placed such a high value on preserving the Union; and Peter Bouteneff on the theological richness of the music of Arvo Pärt.

Areopagus Lecture 5

Alison Milbank: Imaginative Apologetics beyond C. S. Lewis

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In Alison Milbank's Areopagus Lecture, titled “Imaginative Apologetics beyond C. S. Lewis,” Milbank offers an approach to defending the Christian faith that restores the imagination as a faculty inseparable from reason. By using C. S. Lewis as a conversation partner — along with Owen Barfield, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, G. K. Chesterton, and Novalis — Milbank explores how the imagination is not just an instrumental means to an objective end, but the ecstatic and receptive means by which we participate in what is True and Real. $4.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 32

O Come, O Come, Emmanuel: Malcolm Guite and J. A. C. Redford on the Advent O Antiphons

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In this Conversation, poet and priest Malcolm Guite talks about his seven sonnets corresponding to the seven “O Antiphons.” Also included in this Conversation is an interview with composer J. A. C. Redford who collaborated with Malcolm Guite to set Guite’s seven “O Antiphon” sonnets to music for unaccompanied choir. In these interviews, we discuss how poetry and liturgy invite repetition, and also how music can be an interpretation of a text so as to aid how one inhabits poetry over time. 45 minutes $6.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 140

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Guests on Volume 140: Matthew Rubery, on the history of the “talking book,” and on how reading aloud differs from listening to it being read; James Herrick, on the “post-human” aspirations of the transhumanist movement, and how its plausibility is established by stories; Jack Baker & Jeffrey Bilbro, on lessons that universities should heed from Wendell Berry’s essays, poetry, and fiction about commitment to living in a place; Timothy Gloege, on the influence of business methods on 20th-century evangelicalism through the shaping of Moody Bible Institute; David Hollinger, on how the sons and daughters of mid-20th-century missionaries to Asia came back to the U.S. and influenced government, journalism, and the academy; and Barrett Fisher, on the themes of the challenge of faithfulness as presented in Shusaku Endo’s Silence and in Martin Scorsese’s film version.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 137

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Guests on Volume 137: Gilbert Meilaender, on how adoption offers lessons concerning the relationship between nature and grace; James L. Nolan, on what the observations of four distinguished foreign visitors can teach Americans about themselves; Joel Salatin, on how honoring the pigness of pigs enables us to more fully recognize the Godness of God; Michael Di Fuccia, on Owen Barfield’s understanding of the imagination; Robin Leaver, on clarifying some misconceptions about Martin Luther’s commitment to congregational singing; and Michael Marissen, on how J. S. Bach’s music conveys theological meaning.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 136

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Guests on Volume 136: Thomas Albert Howard, on the history of commemorating the Reformation; Mark Noll, on how the Reformers would want to be remembered; Andrew Pettegree, on how Martin Luther transformed the printing industry; Peter Leithart, on the biblical basis for the unity of the Church; Norm Klassen, on the political theology implicit in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales; James Litton, on the life and work of hymnologist, Erik Routley; and Joseph O’Brien, on the neglected literary achievements of J. F. Powers.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 135

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Guests on Volume 135: Bob Cutillo, on the importance of understanding health as a gift; Hans Boersma, on recovering the patristic recognition of the sacramental presence of Christ in the Old Testatment; Dana Gioia, on the devout life and distinctive poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins; Matthew Levering, on the history of proofs of God’s existence, and what we learn about reason when we reason about God; Bruce Gordon, on his “biography” of John Calvin’s Institutes of the Christian Religion; and Markus Rathey, on the dramatic and liturgical character of the major vocal works of Johann Sebastian Bach.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 132

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Guests on Volume 132: David I. Smith, on how metaphors assumed by teachers lead them to imagine the vocation of teaching; Susan Felch, on how the metaphors of gardens, building, and feasting can inform the task of education; D. C. Schindler, on philosopher Robert Spaemann's understanding of a teleological nature; Malcolm Guite, on his seven sonnets based on the ancient “O Antiphons” sung traditionally during Advent; J. A. C. Redford, on setting Malcolm Guite’s “O Antiphon” sonnets to music

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 130

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Guests on Volume 130: Jacob Silverman, on the hidden costs of social media; Carson Holloway, on the neglected role of religious revelation within political science; Joseph Atkinson, on the sacramental and ontological foundations of marriage and family; Greg Peters, on the value of retrieving the theology and practices of Christian monasticism; Antonio López, on human nature and freedom in a technological culture; and Julian Johnson, on how Western music expresses the spirit of modernity.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 128

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Guests on Volume 128: Matthew Crawford, on how skillful engagement with the material world provides the setting for true individuality; Carlo Lancellotti, on Augusto Del Noce's critique of modernity; James Turner, on the origins of the humanities in the venerable discipline of philology; Rod Dreher, on what he learned from Dante’s Divine Comedy; Mark Evan Bonds, on the idea of "absolute music"; and Jeremy Beer, on the neglected accomplishments of Booth Tarkington.

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