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Music & The Arts

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 64

Guests on Volume 64: Paul Berman, on the links between Islamism and other totalitarian utopias; Jean Bethke Elshtain, on justice and the vocation of government, and on maintaining a sense of the holy; Hadley Arkes, on natural rights and "inadvertant treason," and on the rise of a new jurisprudence in Griswold v. Connecticut and Roe v. Wade; Ralph C. Wood, on the place of the seven virtues in J. R. R. Tolkien's vision of the moral life in The Lord of the Rings; and Jeremy Begbie, on what we learn about time, theology, and the structure of creation from the experience of music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 59

Guests on Volume 59: Ron Hansen, on how novelists discover the themes of their writing; Bernard Lewis, on the history of Islamic resentment toward the West; Alan Jacobs, on Michael Chabon's Summerland and Cornelia Funke's The Thief Lord; Adrienne Chaplin, on Art and Soul: Signposts for Christians in the Arts and on the place and responsibility of Christian artists in their communities; Todd Gitlin, on how the torrent of images and sounds overwhelms our lives; and Quentin Schultze, on practical disciplines to live well in the midst of intrusive communications technology.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 58

Guests on Volume 58: Hubert Dreyfus, on the limits of artificial intelligence; Francis Fukuyama, on biotechnology and the arrogance of "participatory evolution"; Gordon Preece, on the underlying assumption of Peter Singer's ethical ideas; Gijs van Hensbergen, on the marvelous architecture of Antoni Gaudí; Ted Prescott, on why the idea of beauty was rejected in the 20th century, and how it is returning; and Bradley J. Birzer, on the mythic roots of Middle Earth in J. R. R. Tolkien's The Silmarillion and on Tolkien's idea of myth.

MARS HILL AUDIO Book 5

A Visit to Vanity Fair: Moral Essays on the Present Age by Alan Jacobs

Available for mp3 purchase
Alan Jacobs, literary critic and professor of humanities at Baylor University, has been a regular guest on the MARS HILL AUDIO Journal since 1993, discussing subjects ranging from the problem of literary sentimentalism (as in The Bridges of Madison County), and the delights of historical fiction (as in seafaring narratives of Patrick O'Brian) to the repulsive attraction of the vampire novels of Anne Rice. In his most recent book, A Visit to Vanity Fair: Moral Essays on the Present Age, Jacobs displays a similar range of breadth and depth, as well as significant portions of wit and grace. Included are essays on the mystery of true friendship (Friendship and Its Discontents), the severing of theology and literature (Preachers without Poetry), and the desire to know the future (Dowsing in Scripture). Read by the author. $15

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 53

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 53: Lawrence Adams, on the possibilities of religious pluralism in Islamic views of state and society; Dana Gioia, on the craft, popularity, and significance of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow; Elmer M. Colyer, on theologian Thomas F. Torrance's understanding of the Incarnation; R. A. Herrera, on how the Christian view of Creation and Incarnation shapes an understanding of history; Margaret Visser, on learning to recognize the deep meaning in the design of Christian churches; and Joseph Pearce, on Tolkien's other writings and on his view of myth and story.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 51

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 51: Nigel Cameron, on the challenges of bioethics and how Christians ignore them; David Blankenhorn, on the public meaning of marriage and the private sector and the family; Robert Wuthnow, on creativity and faith; Mortimer Adler, on philosophical theism and How to Think about God; Roger Lundin, on the vision of William Blake; Dana Gioia, on the place of poetry and the way words work; Mary Midgley, on the ways science explains reality; and Ted Libbey, on the life and music of Edmund Rubbra.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 50

Guests on Volume 50: Stanley Carlson-Thies, on the theology of "charitable choice"; Bruce S. Thornton, on the loss of ends and the exultation of appetite in the academy; A. J. Conyers, on the origins of the modern view of tolerance (and of Big Government); Stanton L. Jones, on various configurations of science, morality, and homosexuality; Arthur Holmes, on the history of Christianity and education in the liberal arts; Carson Holloway, on All Shook Up: Music, Passion, and Politics; Ted Prescott, on the popular paintings and the prophetic claims of Thomas Kinkade; and Glenn C. Arbery, on the achievement of form in literature.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 47

Guests on Volume 47: Christopher Clausen, on detachment from normative communities in a post-cultural age; Don Eberly, on the meaning of and challenges for civil society; George Weigel, on Pope John Paul II's theology of embodiment and sexuality; Luci Shaw, on poetry that reminds us that Christ's suffering shadows over the celebration of the Incarnation; Steve Wilkens, on Christianity and Western Thought: A History of Philosophers, Ideas, and Movements; David Harvey, on place and spaces, public and private; John Durham Peters, on the utopianism present in the modern idea of communication; and Masaaki Suzuki, on the ways in which Bach's music is a vehicle for the Gospel.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 46

Guests on Volume 46: E. Michael Jones, on how horror films combat the assumptions of the Enlightenment; D. G. Hart, on The University Gets Religion: Religious Studies in American Higher Education; Amy & Leon Kass, on training young people to imagine what love looks like; John Leax, on the challenges of wise "caretaking" in a fallen world; Richard Wilbur, on the ways in which words add "articulateness" to experience; Roger Lundin, on Richard Wilbur's commitment to the reality of creation; and Ted Libbey, on the intricate, theologically inspired structure of Bach's B Minor Mass.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 45

Guests on Volume 45: Jeff Speck, on how suburban sprawl prevents the formation of real neighborhoods; Victor Davis Hanson, on the demise of family farms and what it means for American democracy; Allan C. Carlson, on the contributions (and weaknesses) of 20th century agrarian thinkers; Paulina Borsook, on how Silicon Valley enshrines libertarian values; John F. Kilner, on possible strategies for rejecting cloning in the courts; Robert E. Webber, on Ancient-Future Faith: Rethinking Evangelicalism for a Postmodern World; and Christoph Wolff, on how J. S. Bach used music to pursue an understanding of God through creation.

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