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Music & The Arts

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 45

Guests on Volume 45: Jeff Speck, on how suburban sprawl prevents the formation of real neighborhoods; Victor Davis Hanson, on the demise of family farms and what it means for American democracy; Allan C. Carlson, on the contributions (and weaknesses) of 20th century agrarian thinkers; Paulina Borsook, on how Silicon Valley enshrines libertarian values; John F. Kilner, on possible strategies for rejecting cloning in the courts; Robert E. Webber, on Ancient-Future Faith: Rethinking Evangelicalism for a Postmodern World; and Christoph Wolff, on how J. S. Bach used music to pursue an understanding of God through creation.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 44

Guests on Volume 44: James Davison Hunter, on the limits of the psychological view of character; Brian Robertson, on the changes in attitudes toward work and home; David Myers, on the disjunction of wealth and happiness, and crafting a "new American dream"; Robert Frank, on the escalation of luxury and how it can be slowed; Gayle Brandow Samuels, on trees, landscape, and cultural identity; Thomas Hine, on The Rise and Fall of the American Teenager; Thomas Hibbs, on Seinfeld, Hannibal Lecter, and nihilism in popular culture; and Robin Leaver, on how J. S. Bach used musical forms to impart theological truths.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 43

Guests on Volume 43: Jedediah Purdy, on the ironic mood and its effect on public life; Lendol Calder, on the cultural significance of consumer credit; John Nelson, on Soli Deo Gloria, commissioning sacred classical works; George Arasimowicz, on crafting a tone poem about the life of Peter; James Calvin Schaap, on writing and the challenge to piety; Frederick Buechner, on the ministry of memoirs and the importance of remembering; Kay Hymowitz, on mistaken ideas of adulthood and childhood; and Calvin Stapert, on My Only Comfort: Death, Deliverance, and Discipleship in the Music of Bach.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 39

Guests on Volume 39: Neal Gabler, on how entertainment has become the highest value in our culture; C. John Sommerville, on How the News Makes Us Dumb: The Death of Wisdom in an Information Society; John L. Locke, on the value of personal interaction, and how technology is displacing it; Vigen Guroian, on gardening; Marion Montgomery, on how higher education has lost its way; Peter Berkowitz, on why liberal democracies need virtuous citizens; Harry Clor, on the need for the law to return to encouraging a public morality; and Ted Libbey, on French composer Francis Poulenc.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 37

Guests on Volume 37: Gregory Wolfe, on how "religious humanism" follows the model of the incarnation; Jill P. Baumgaertner, on violence and the grotesque in Flannery O'Connor; D. Bruce Lockerbie, on the struggle of many modern writers against religion; Roger Lundin, on Alfred Kazin's God and the American Writer; Donald McCullough, on the religious rootedness of courtesy; David Nye, on how technologies build cultural momentum in unexpected ways; Kathleen Powers Erickson, on the Spiritual Vision of Vincent Van Gogh; and Michael Marissen, on how J. S. Bach avoided anti-Judaism.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 35

Guests on Volume 35: Jill Paton Walsh, on completing Dorothy Sayers's unfinished novel, Thrones, Dominations; James Como, on the rhetorical skills of C. S. Lewis; Walter Hooper, on his first meeting with C. S. Lewis; Victor Davis Hanson, on how Greek convictions shaped Western institutions; Robert C. Roberts, on Christian psychology and the definition of human personality; David Gill, on Jacques Ellul's The Presence of the Kingdom; Ted Smith, III, on Richard Weaver's Ideas Have Consequences; and Ken Myers, on Christmas Music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 34

Guests on Volume 34: Michael Aeschliman, on C. S. Lewis and the problem of scientism; Jeremy Rifkin, on The Biotech Century: Harnessing the Gene And Remaking the World; Jean Bethke Elshtain, on Vaclav Havel, identity politics, and the possibilities of democracy; Katherine Shaw Spaht, on the purposes of covenant marriage laws; Steven L. Nock, on why married couples divorce; Louise Cowan, on how classics address our imagination; Ramsey MacMullen, on the rise of Christendom; and Ted Libbey, on the music of Hildegard von Bingen.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 33

Guests on Volume 33: Elizabeth Haiken, on Venus Envy: A History of Cosmetic Surgery; Patrick Glynn, on recovering belief; Thomas Howard, on C. S. Lewis's Till We Have Faces; David Wells, on how our culture distracts us from remembering moral nature; Peter Heslam, on Abraham Kuyper, Calvinist theologian and statesman; Suzanna Sherry, on the assault on truth in legal scholarship; Ted Libbey, on Felix Mendelssohn's oratorios, Elijah and Paulus; and David Wells, on the contrast between classic and postmodern spirituality.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 32

Guests on Volume 32: Mark Kingwell, on hope and fear at the edge of the millennium; Daniel Pipes, on where beliefs about conspiracies come from; Herb Kutchins, on the DSM and problems in making mental health diagnoses; Nicholas Wolterstorff, on the presence of God in the paintings of Stanley Spencer; Vincent Scully, on the nature of cities and urban life; Richard Moe, on preserving communities and saving old buildings; Joel Carpenter, on fundamentalism as a true religious movement, not a reactionary social movement; and Bruce L. Edwards, Jr., on learning from and teaching C. S. Lewis.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 29

Guests on Volume 29: Richard John Neuhaus, on the recent judicial usurpation of democracy; John Patrick Diggins, on Max Weber's insights into democracy and leadership; Norman Cantor, on how postmodern culture resembles the baroque period; Alan Jacobs, on William Faulkner as a modernist and a Southerner; Charles Marsh, on the theological depth of the civil rights movement; David Park, on how pre-modern Christians understood light; and Ted Libbey, on Franz Schubert's role in inventing Romanticism.

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