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Philosophy

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 142

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Guests on Volume 142: Stanley Hauerwas, on writing letters to his godson about the virtues; Perry L. Glanzer and Nathan F. Alleman, on the fragmentation of modern higher education and why we need theology to unify universities; Jeffrey Bishop, on how modern medicine shapes an inadequate understanding of the human body; Alan Jacobs, on how contemporary communications media discourage charitable thinking; D. C. Schindler, on the diabolical nature of the modern understanding of freedom; and Marianne Wright, on how the gospel comes through in the writings of George MacDonald.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 141

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Guests on Volume 141: Grant Wythoff, on the technophiliac obsessions of Hugo Gernsback, the geeky midwife of modern science fiction; Susanna Lee, on how the hard-boiled protagonists of crime fiction in the 1930s and 40s were replaced by more nihilistic tough guys in the 1950s and 60s; Gerald R. McDermott, on how the work of theologian E. L. Mascall can expose blind spots in contemporary Christian thought; Carlos Eire, on how and why religion became “interiorized” in the wake of the reformations of the sixteenth century; Kelly Kapic, on theology’s use of experience and why the Incarnation is the ground of Christian hope; and James Matthew Wilson, on the beauty of truth and goodness, and on the necessity of cultivating “intellectual vision.”

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 30

Rebecca DeYoung on Vainglory, the Forgotten Vice

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In this conversation, philosopher Rebecca DeYoung explains how the language of vices speaks to patterns or narratives in our lives in a way that is distinct from “original sin” and from “sin as moments or acts of rule-breaking.” Drawing from the wisdom of the Desert Fathers, DeYoung describes vainglory and the other “deadly sins” as capital vices from which more vices may materialize. 56 minutes

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 139

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Guests on Volume 139: W. Bradford Littlejohn, on post-Reformation debates about the meaning of freedom; Simon Oliver, on how the doctrine of creation ex nihilo is a doctrine about God (and not just the origin of the universe); Matthew Levering, on the necessity of God’s wisdom in the doctrine of creation; Esther Lightcap Meek, on Michael Polanyi’s case that making contact with reality is a process of discovery; Paul Tyson, on resisting our modern assumptions about knowledge in favor of knowledge that is grounded in wonder; and David Fagerberg, on acquiring a liturgical posture in everyday life.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 16

David Bentley Hart, "A Perfect Game: The Metaphysical Meaning of Baseball"

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(from First Things, August 2010)

In this playful article from First Things, theologian David Bentley Hart muses on what is arguably America’s greatest contribution to civilization: baseball. Baseball, as Hart would have it, is the Platonic ideal of sports, “a game utterly saturated by infinity,” a game not contrived by our own artifice, but a discovery long kept secret in the dark mysteries of Reality. Contrary to what Hart disparagingly dubs “the oblong game” — the spatial and temporal confines of which are “pitilessly finite” — baseball in its shape and motion stretches towards endless vistas, unfolding organically according to its own narrative and inner logic while at the same time striving to complete the most perfect of shapes, the circle. Read by Ken Myers. 27 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 135

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Guests on Volume 135: Bob Cutillo, on the importance of understanding health as a gift; Hans Boersma, on recovering the patristic recognition of the sacramental presence of Christ in the Old Testatment; Dana Gioia, on the devout life and distinctive poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins; Matthew Levering, on the history of proofs of God’s existence, and what we learn about reason when we reason about God; Bruce Gordon, on his “biography” of John Calvin’s Institutes of the Christian Religion; and Markus Rathey, on the dramatic and liturgical character of the major vocal works of Johann Sebastian Bach.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 132

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Guests on Volume 132: David I. Smith, on how metaphors assumed by teachers lead them to imagine the vocation of teaching; Susan Felch, on how the metaphors of gardens, building, and feasting can inform the task of education; D. C. Schindler, on philosopher Robert Spaemann's understanding of a teleological nature; Malcolm Guite, on his seven sonnets based on the ancient “O Antiphons” sung traditionally during Advent; J. A. C. Redford, on setting Malcolm Guite’s “O Antiphon” sonnets to music

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 128

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Guests on Volume 128: Matthew Crawford, on how skillful engagement with the material world provides the setting for true individuality; Carlo Lancellotti, on Augusto Del Noce's critique of modernity; James Turner, on the origins of the humanities in the venerable discipline of philology; Rod Dreher, on what he learned from Dante’s Divine Comedy; Mark Evan Bonds, on the idea of "absolute music"; and Jeremy Beer, on the neglected accomplishments of Booth Tarkington.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 126

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Guests on Volume 126: James W. Skillen, on how all human cultural activity, including politics, should be understood in the context of God’s good purposes for Creation; Christian Smith, on how American sociology is not (as is claimed) a disinterested scientific endeavor but the pursuit of a sacred project driven by sacred commitments; B. W. Powe, on the unique “apocalyptic” insights of Marshall McLuhan and Northrop Frye; David Downing, on C. S. Lewis’s The Pilgrim’s Regress; Roger Scruton, on the inability for materialism to give a satisfactory account of our experience of the material world; and Jonathan Arnold, on the curious place of sacred music in a secular society.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 125

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Guests on Volume 125: Brent Hull, on the virtues of craftsmanship; David Koyzis, on the goodness and nature of authority; Steve Wilkens, on three Christian views of the relationship between faith and reason; Roger Lundin, on faith and doubt in an inescapably verbal universe; Craig Bernthal, on the Christian doctrine of Creation in Tolkien’s mythic writings; and Kerry McCarthy, on the life and legacy of English Renaissance composer William Byrd.

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