Topics

Politics

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 142

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 142: Stanley Hauerwas, on writing letters to his godson about the virtues; Perry L. Glanzer and Nathan F. Alleman, on the fragmentation of modern higher education and why we need theology to unify universities; Jeffrey Bishop, on how modern medicine shapes an inadequate understanding of the human body; Alan Jacobs, on how contemporary communications media discourage charitable thinking; D. C. Schindler, on the diabolical nature of the modern understanding of freedom; and Marianne Wright, on how the gospel comes through in the writings of George MacDonald.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 21

Christopher Lasch, "Conservatism against Itself"

Available for mp3 purchase
(From First Things, April 1990)

In this early article from First Things, historian Christopher Lasch poses the question of whether cultural conservatism is compatible with capitalism. If, as Lasch argues, conservatism is defined by a respect for limits — that human freedom has constraints imposed upon it by nature, history, human fallibility, and “original sin” — then the unrelenting and insatiable quest for ever-increasing standards of comfort that capitalism encourages is completely at odds with conservative values. Despite nineteenth-century attempts to bolster the family as the primary means of curbing the large-scale transfer of “private vices” to “public virtues” implied in liberal economic theory, the effects of twentieth-century capitalism have only underscored how vulnerable the family is when the integrity of its surrounding local institutions is destroyed. Also included in this article is an account of lower-middle class versus upper-middle class cultural values as well as the alternative — though now largely unheard of — economic approaches to liberal capitalism advanced by the distributists and syndicalists. 42 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 19

Jeremy Beer, "On Christopher Lasch"

Available for mp3 purchase
(From Modern Age, Fall 2005)

In this biographical sketch, Jeremy Beer describes the intellectual trajectory of cultural historian, Christopher Lasch, whose career spanned from the 1960s through the early 1990s. Beer recounts how, despite growing up in a “militantly secular” home and, throughout his career, sympathetically grappling with the works of Marx and Freud, Christopher Lasch distanced himself from the leftist “radical intellectuals,” whose version of progressivism did not coincide with Lasch’s understanding of a healthy democracy. In his scholarship and criticism, Lasch was concerned about democracy, both as an achievable ideal and as an imperfect reality. He rejected the Left-Right dualism of American politics, arguing that the ostensibly opposing ideologies were merely two sides of the same coin that amounted to the refusal to acknowledge human limitations. Lasch’s diagnosis of the modern, “anxiously narcissistic” self involved a sharp critique of the culture that produced it, namely, a culture that condoned the conquest of nature through scientific, technological, and economic methods without any regard for naturally or institutionally based limits on human freedom. 55 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 138

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 138: John Milbank, on why politics needs to recognize the human soul (and what happens when it doesn’t); Adrian Pabst, on the “metacrisis” of liberalism; Glenn Olsen, on Christopher Dawson’s understanding of religion and culture; Rupert Shortt, on how scientism misunderstands God and divine action; Oliver O’Donovan, on the significance of love, community, and friendship as ethical and eschatological categories; and David Bentley Hart, on the hazards and delights of translating the New Testament.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 133

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 133: Darío Fernández-Morera, on the real history of Islamic Spain in the Middle Ages; Francis Oakley, on the enduring belief in sacral kingship and the secularization of politics in the late Middle Ages; Oliver O'Donovan, on why all political authority can only be properly understood by way of analogy with God’s kingship; Thomas Storck, on the conflicts between “Americanism” and Catholic social teaching; John Safranek, on the self-contradictory character of modern liberalism; Brian Brock, on the challenges and opportunities of being a “Church theologian” in a secular university; George Marsden, on the birth and influential life of C. S. Lewis’s Mere Christianity.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 131

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 131: John Durham Peters, on understanding media as agencies of order, not just devices of information; Paul Heintzman, on how a biblical understanding of human spirituality can inform our concept of “leisure”; Richard Lints, on how the image of God and idolatry are inversely related; Peter Harrison, on how our current definition of “science” and “religion” represents novel conceptual categories; Francis J. Beckwith, on the widespread tendency to erect a wall between faith and reason; David L. Schindler & Nicholas J. Healy, Jr., on how the First Amendment is not as sympathetic to religious freedom as is commonly believed.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 130

Available for mp3 purchase

Guests on Volume 130: Jacob Silverman, on the hidden costs of social media; Carson Holloway, on the neglected role of religious revelation within political science; Joseph Atkinson, on the sacramental and ontological foundations of marriage and family; Greg Peters, on the value of retrieving the theology and practices of Christian monasticism; Antonio López, on human nature and freedom in a technological culture; and Julian Johnson, on how Western music expresses the spirit of modernity.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 126

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 126: James W. Skillen, on how all human cultural activity, including politics, should be understood in the context of God’s good purposes for Creation; Christian Smith, on how American sociology is not (as is claimed) a disinterested scientific endeavor but the pursuit of a sacred project driven by sacred commitments; B. W. Powe, on the unique “apocalyptic” insights of Marshall McLuhan and Northrop Frye; David Downing, on C. S. Lewis’s The Pilgrim’s Regress; Roger Scruton, on the inability for materialism to give a satisfactory account of our experience of the material world; and Jonathan Arnold, on the curious place of sacred music in a secular society.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 119

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 119: Mary Eberstadt, on how the decline of formation of natural families has made Christian belief less plausible and contributed to the secularization of Europe; Allan Bevere, on why the claim by “empire criticism” that the letter to the Colossians is a veiled repudiation of Roman imperial hubris is mistaken; Peter J. Leithart, on how the Bible evaluates empires in light of their relationship with the people of God; Steven Boyer, on why “mystery” is a necessary category in Christian theology; Karen Dieleman, on how different liturgical practices of Victorian congregationalism, Anglo-Catholicism, and Roman Catholicism influenced the poetry of Elizabeth Barret Browning, Christina Rossetti, and Adelaide Proctor; and Peter Phillips, on the founding of The Tallis Scholars and the peculiar beauty of Renaissance polyphony.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Oliver O’Donovan in Conversation

"The Gospel and Public Life: Cultivating a Faithful Witness in the Face of Challenge" — a public conversation held at Capitol Hill on October 8, 2013. The conversation addressed questions and themes of political theology and was loosely centered around O’Donovan’s 1996 book, The Desire of the Nations.

Pages