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MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 10

Richard Sherlock, "The Secret of Straussianism"

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(from Modern Age, Summer 2006)

Leo Strauss (1899-1973) was one of the most influential political philosophers of the 20th century. In this essay, Richard Sherlock explores the significance of Strauss's methodology, focusing on how he understood the communication of ideas in classical and modern thought about political order. Strauss's deep, insightful readings and profound respect for the writers of seminal works manifested a powerful apologetic for the idea of "classic natural right," even as his intellectual esotericism masked a critical gap in his political philosophy. Read by Ken Myers. 36 minutes. $2.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 86

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Guests on Volume 86: Roger Lundin on why, after Vietnam, American literary critics forgot about American religion; Lawrence Buell, on diverse visions of America and Nature; Harold K. Bush, Jr., on the glorification of the American way as a civil religion; Roger Lundin, on the transformation of the nature of belief in the late 19th century; Katherine Shaw Spaht, on radical autonomy, marriage, divorce, and law; Steven L. Nock, on how broadly shared cultural assumptions affect laws regulating marriage and divorce; Norman Klassen & Jens Zimmermann, on the Incarnation and humanism, and on how various dualisms affect our assumptions about faith, knowledge, and higher education.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 84

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Guests on Volume 84: Harry R. Lewis, on higher education's amnesia about its purposes, and how that shortchanges students; Nicholas Wolterstorff, on Abraham Kuyper (1837-1927), the French Revolution, worldviews, and "sphere sovereignty"; Brendan Sweetman, on why religious worldviews should not be excluded from political life; James Turner Johnson, on the development of Christian thought about the meaning of marriage; David Martin, on how the 1960s replayed themes of the 1890s and 1930s; and Edward Ericson, Jr., on Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's beginnings and legacy.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 4

John Pollock, "William Wilberforce: A Man Who Changed His Times"

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(A Trinity Forum Reading, 1996)

"God Almighty has set before me two great objects: the suppression of the Slave Trade and the reformation of manners." William Wilberforce, a young parliamentarian, recorded these audacious ambitions in his diary on October 28, 1787. Forty-six years later and three days before his death, slavery was abolished throughout the entire British empire. Over the course of these years he went from being one of the most vilified men in Europe to one of the most loved and revered in the world. This biographical account of Wilberforce's life and work was written by John Pollock, and is introduced by J. Douglas Holladay. Read by Ken Myers. 50 minutes. $2.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 5

David Aikman, "One Word of Truth: A Portrait of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn"

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(A Trinity Forum Reading, 1997)

In 1989, David Aikman, then a journalist with Time magazine, was granted the first major interview Solzhenitsyn had given an American news organization for years. In this essay, Aikman offers an engaging and lively account of the dramatic and sobering events of Solzhenitsyn's life: from his early years as a Communist, to the beginnings of his literary efforts and his subsequent imprisonment, to his exile and life in the West, to his return to Russia in the 1990s. A portrait emerges of a courageous man devoted to the battle for truth in the context of the distinctive disorders of modern, post-Christian culture. This Reprint is read by the author, and includes a foreword written and read by Os Guinness on the contemporary crisis of truth in the West. 107 minutes. $2.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 3

Joshua P. Hochschild, "Globalization: Ancient and Modern"

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(from The Intercollegiate Review, Spring 2006)

Beginning with the refreshing observation of the sheer ugliness of the word "globalization" ("an adjective, converted into a barbaric verb, then forced into service as a still more barbaric noun"), Hochschild observes that this misbegotten word labels a poorly defined concept. Despite its vagueness, it "suggests a trend toward increased economic and political interdependence, which at once fosters and is fostered by cultural homogenization." Hochschild goes on to examine the effects of this trend on local communities and insists that any effort to evaluate globalization requires a return to a "political teleology," reflection on the ends of politics given the ends of human being. Read by Ken Myers. 36 Minutes. $2.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 1

Roger Kimball, "Leszek Kolakowski and the Anatomy of Totalitarianism"

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(from The New Criterion, June 2005)

Born in 1927 in Poland, Leszek Kolakowski grew out of his youthful Stalinism to become one of the most penetrating critics of Marxism. In his masterful three-volume Main Currents of Marxism, he concluded: "The self-deification of mankind, to which Marxism gave philosophical expression, has ended in the same way as all such attempts, whether individual or collective: it has revealed itself as the farcical aspect of human bondage." Kolakowski's diagnosis of the spiritual crisis of modernity goes far beyond his critique of Marxism; in a variety of books, essays, and public addresses, he regularly returned to the problem of modern culture's denial of the sacred. This essay by Roger Kimball, editor of The New Criterion, was written on the occasion of the release of a new edition of Main Currents of Marxism, and sets the arguments in that book in the wider context of Kolakowski's other work. Read by Ken Myers. 35 minutes. $2.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 81

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Guests on Volume 81: Nigel Cameron on the lack of ethical reflection in public policy on technology; Joel James Shuman on beliefs about God's nature and purposes informing how we think about sickness and medicine; Brian Volck on embodied life, stories, and how medical practice involves attending to the stories of the bodies of patients; Russell Hittinger on the modern state giving rise to modern Catholic social thought; Mark Noll on learning to think about law and politics from earlier Christians who lived in very different political circumstances; and Stephen Miller on the factors that sustain the art of conversation, and why it's a dying art.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 80

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Guests on Volume 80: Stephen A. McKnight on The Religious Foundations of Francis Bacon's Thought; Tim Morris & Don Petcher on science, Christology, and why segregating nature from supernature doesn't do justice to either; Vigen Guroian on the mystical character of fragrance and on why working in his garden is an imitation of the Master Gardener; Paul Valliere on Orthodox theology's engagement with questions concerning law, politics, and human nature, and on the ideas of Vladimir Soloviev (1853-1900); Vigen Guroian on the importance of personality and community in the thought of Nicholas Berdyaev (1874-1948); and Calvin Stapert on the affirmation of Creation and intimations of transcendence in the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 79

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Guests on Volume 79: Carson Holloway on why sociobiology and evolutionary psychology are inadequate bases for sustaining political ideals; Peter Augustine Lawler on why we are more than "individuals" narrowly defined; Hadley Arkes on the difference, in law, between evidence from social scientific data and moral truths; Ben Witherington, III on why The Da Vinci Code's implausible account of history seems credible to many people; Christopher Shannon on Ivan Illich (Medical Nemesis) and the loss of belief in the possibility that suffering can be meaningful; Roger Lundin on how nature and experience replaced revelation as a source of authority (and why they fail to serve as such), and on the necessity of humility in writing biographies.

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