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MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 24

Guests on Volume 24: James Davison Hunter, on a survey about American political life conducted by the Post-Modernity Project; Robert H. Bork, on judicial complicity in the coarsening of America; Rochelle Gurstein, on how some advocates of unbridled free expression had second thoughts; Roger Shattuck, on how we've lost the ability to recognize the fact that some knowledge is bad for us; Michael Behe, on how complexity in cells suggests an intelligent designer; David Morgan, on the Paintings of Warner Sallman; and Ted Libbey, on Gabriel Fauré's Requiem.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 23

Guests on Volume 23: John Steadman Rice, on how the idea of codependency is based on tenets of "liberation psychotherapy"; E. D. Hirsch, Jr., on The Schools We Need and Why We Don't Have Them; Ted McAllister, on Revolt Against Modernity: Leo Strauss, Eric Voeglin, and the Search for a Postliberal Order; Judith Skelton Grant, on Robertson Davies: Man of Myth; Terry Teachout, on why music should not be propagandistic; John Boyle, on his Requiem for the Unborn; Leland Ryken, on what makes a classic and how we should read one; and Daniel Ritchie, on a Biblical view of language and literature.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 22

Guests on Volume 22: Andrew Delbanco, on how American culture has effaced the idea of evil; Michael Uhlmann, on two appellate court cases concerning the matter of doctor-assisted suicide; Carlos F. Gomez, on why some American doctors have embraced the idea of killing their patients; Michael Sandel, on the dangers of seeing democracy merely as morally neutral "procedures" to adjudicate differences; Hadley Arkes, on how arguments for legalizing same-gender marriages go further than their advocates would like; and Robert George, on why marriage is an intrinsic good.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 21

Guests on Volume 21: James Twitchell, on ways advertising shapes (and thins out) American culture; Lynne Cheney, on the politics of ideas in higher education; Peter Berkowitz, on how Friedrich Nietzsche was torn between certainty of the "death of God" and belief in the divinity of truth; Ron Hansen, on what makes good fiction; Frederica Mathewes-Green, on "The America We Seek," an important pro-life manifesto; Robert Higgs, on how professional sports have lost a sense of play; Terry Eastland, on why affirmative action is ending; and Ted Libbey, on Brahms's German Requiem.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 20

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Guests on Volume 20: Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, on the benefits of single-sex education, and the confusion of "elite" feminism; Robert D. Richardson, Jr., on why the work of Ralph Waldo Emerson continues to attract certain religious seekers; Roger Lundin, on Emerson's assertion of alternatives to Christianity, and how they have seeped under the American cultural skin; Wilfred McClay, on individualism and collectivism in American society; Andrew A. Tadie, on learning to love and learn from G. K. Chesterton; Robert Jenson, on why the life of the mind matters to the Church, and how it should take shape in the world; Ted Prescott, on why artists have been attracted to abstraction, and what viewers should look for in abstract art; and Ted Libbey, on Haydn's The Creation.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 19

Guests on Volume 19: Robert Goodman, on economic and moral effects of state-sponsored gambling; Ted Prescott, on modernist artists Brancusi and Mondrian, and why they were attracted to abstraction; Daniel Chirot, on how resentful nationalism and utopian ideologies combine to form Modern Tyrants; Edward Ericson, Jr., on books by and about Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn; Alan Jacobs, on the portrayal of morals and manners in films based on Jane Austen novels; Charles Sykes, on why schools have abandoned the life of the mind; Allan C. Carlson, on what's wrong with Hillary Rodham Clinton's It Takes a Village; and Thomas Connolly, on music and cosmic coherence.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 18

Guests on Volume 18: Leigh Eric Schmidt, on how the marketplace has shaped American celebration of the holidays; John Patrick Diggins, on how pragmatism fails to offer a coherent way of understanding of the world; Joseph Frank, on moral themes in the fiction of Fyodor Dostoevsky; Thomas Howard, on the supernatural thrillers of Charles Williams; Ken Myers, on Marsalis on Music, a book and a video series on music appreciation; Deal Hudson, on the themes of family in the work of Sigrid Undset, author of Kristin Lavransdatter and The Master of Hestviken; George McKenna, on how President Lincoln might have fought abortion; and Ted Libbey, on master English composer Henry Purcell.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 17

Guests on Volume 17: Alan Jacobs, on the seafaring fiction of novelist Patrick O'Brian; Barry Sanders, on the deeper dynamics of literacy; Mark Slouka, on bizarre Gnostic temptations in cyberspace; Alan Ehrenhalt, on how valuing choice hurts community; Geoffrey T. Holtz, on twenty-somethings and the shape of family life; Mardi Keyes, on dubious assumptions about the nature of adolescence; W. Bradford Wilcox, on tradition and belief; Glenn Loury, on race and relationships; and John Hodges, on the influence of Russian Orthodoxy in the music of John Tavener.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 15

Guests on Volume 15: Jean Bethke Elshtain, on Democracy on Trial; Barry Alan Shain, on communalism in early American Protestantism; Christopher Wolfe, on the moral basis for strong local government; A. G. Mojtabai, on how contemporary novelists ignore religion; Robert Pinsky, on the challenges of translating Dante's Inferno; Suzanne Wolfe, on choosing books for children; Amy Waldman, on the ersatz community of TV shopping networks; Mark Crispin Miller, on the dehumanized feeling so common in modern advertising; Ted Prescott, on the Whitney Biennial, Bruce Nauman, and the "Mutant Materials" exhibit; and Edward Rothstein, on the inner meaning of music and mathematics.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 9

The Supreme Court and Abortion

Russell Hittinger, associate professor of theology at Catholic University, talks about the evolution of the Supreme Court’s reasoning about abortion, privacy, and liberty, culminating in the extraordinary views of Planned Parenthood v. Casey.

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