Topics

Science

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 117

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 117: Matthew Dickerson, on the likenesses between Beowulf and three of Tolkien’s heroes, and on how (despite Peter Jackson’s rendition) The Lord of the Rings is more interested in virtue than in military exploits; Jennifer Woodruff Tait, on how assumptions about the nature of moral knowledge—derived from the school of common-sense realism—compelled Victorian Methodists and others to substitute grape juice for wine in celebrating the Lord’s Supper; Jeffry Davis and Philip Ryken, on why the liberal arts ought to be recognized as a calling that enriches Christian living; and Robert George, on the consequences of redefining marriage.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Free Demo Issue

Please stream or download our free demo issue — a representative selection of past interviews — to get a sense of what it’s like to subscribe.

If you wish to receive or to send a free Demo CD to a friend, email us at soundthinking@marshillaudio.org or call toll-free at 1.800.331.6407.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 116

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 116: Stratford Caldecott, on why education should be designed with a deep and wide understanding of human nature and must sustain the unity of knowledge; Fred Bahnson, on how a Christian understanding of God's redemptive work on the earth should influence our practices of growing and sharing food; Eric O. Jacobsen, on how modernism distorted the shape of cities and how Christian reflection on the nature of neighborliness can help restore them; J. Budziszewski, on how meaning in human life transcends a merely biological explanation of our behavior; Brian Brock, on the various ways in which the Church has regarded its obligation to welcome the disabled; and Allen Verhey, on the difference between a "medicalized" death and a death experienced in light of God's cosmic work of redemption.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 113

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 113: Steven Shapin, on whether or not there is a single thing called "science," and whether scientists are united by a single "scientific method"; Arthur Boers, on why the ways in which technologies shape our lives should be recognized as spiritual and pastoral challenges; Christine Pohl, on why a deliberate commitment to certain shared practices is necessary for the sustaining of community; Norman Wirzba, on how attentiveness to our eating and our care of the land are central aspects of culture and of godly faith; Craig Bartholomew, on carelessness concerning embodied experience and our "crisis of place"; and David I. Smith, on how the forms of pedagogical practices ought to be crafted to correspond to the content of teaching.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 106

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 106: Adam Briggle, on how Leon Kass's leadership of the President's Council on Bioethics attempted to reframe public thinking about ethical matters; John C. Médaille, on why economics should be concerned with ethical matters from the bottom up; Christopher Page, on how the presence of choral music in the Church shaped the rise of the West; Christian Smith, on why sociologists need a richer understanding of human nature and human personhood and should recognize "love" as an essential human attribute; Herman Daly, on why he and Wendell Berry are disturbed by the lack of attention paid by classical economics to the realities of the material world; and Thomas Hibbs, on the dark nihilism in the films of Woody Allen.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 104

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 104: James Le Fanu, on the mistaken assumption that modern medical science has eliminated the fittingness of a sense of mystery and wonder at the human mind and body; Garret Keizer, on how many noises in modern life reveal a state of warfare with the limitations of our embodiment; Daniel Ritchie, on how Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) and Isaac Watts (1674-1748) anticipated late twentieth-century critiques of the Enlightenment; Monica Ganas, on how the distinct vision of life embedded in "California-ism" has exerted a powerful cultural influence; Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove, on how the search for faithfulness to Christ led him to the wisdom of the Benedictine Rule and a "new monasticism"; and Peter J. Leithart, on why Constantine has an unfairly bad reputation and on how his rule dealt a severe blow to paganism in the West.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 100

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 100: Jennifer Burns, on the life and legacy of Ayn Rand, "goddess of the market" and entrenched enemy of altruism; Christian Smith, on the aimless cultural world of "emerging adulthood" and on how it makes the idea of objective moral order implausible; and Dallas Willard, on why it's important to recover the conviction that religious beliefs involve real knowledge. In honor of the five score milestone, part two of the issue features a look back at the beginnings of the Journal and a few special excerpts of conversations with those early guests, including Peter Kreeft on Lewis, Huxley, and J.F.K. after death; P. D. James, on good and evil in fiction; James Davison Hunter, on culture wars; Paul McHugh, on when psychiatry loses its way; Ted Prescott, on nudity in art and advertising; Ed Knippers, on the powerful presence of the body; Martha Bayles, on pop and perverse modernism; Dominic Aquila, on Christopher Lasch; Gilbert Meilaender, on random kindness; Neil Postman, on technology and culture; and Alan Jacobs, on being maudlin in Madison County.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 12

Mickey Craig & Jon Fennell, "Love in the Age of Neuroscience"

Available for mp3 purchase
(from The New Atlantis, Fall 2005)

When Tom Wolfe's novel, I Am Charlotte Simmons, was originally published in 2004, most of the reviews concentrated on the story's sexual escapades. The book was received by social conservatives as an indictment of collegiate promiscuity and dismissed by progressives as a tired and embarrassing display of peephole prurience by a once-vital writer now in his grumpy 70s. Mickey Craig and Jon Fennell argue that sexual confusion is simply a symptom of a larger crisis prominently explored in the book. "The novel invites us to ask: Is love possible in the age of neuroscience? Or have we unmasked human beings only to discover that love is an illusion?" Read by Ken Myers. 38 minutes. $2.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 93

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 93: Alan Jacobs, on practical consequences of belief in original sin (and the five distinct components of that belief); James A. Herrick, on redemptive myths advanced by science fiction and speculative science and on evolution as a religion; J. Daryl Charles, on the commitment by the magisterial Reformers to the idea of natural law; Robert C. Roberts, on the role of emotions in ethical and spiritual life; Allan C. Carlson, on how the industrial revolution changed the shape of households (including their floorplans) and the understanding of marriage; and Sheila O'Connor-Ambrose, on the work of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese in defending marriage against the various claims of individualism.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 25

The Heav'ns and All the Powers Therein: The Medieval Cosmos and the World of Narnia

Available for mp3 purchase
For decades, readers and scholars have wondered whether there was a Master Plan for the structure of the seven books in C. S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia. In his book Planet Narnia, Michael Ward makes a compelling case that the qualities attributed to the seven planets in the cosmology of antiquity and the Middle Ages are embodied in the seven books about Narnia. In this Conversation, Ward explains why Lewis thought the pre-Copernican view of the cosmos can still be of spiritual benefit, that although it may not be true in a factual sense, its beauty nonetheless reveals deeper truths. 67 minutes. $6.

Pages