People

Alexis De Tocqueville

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 137

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Guests on Volume 137: Gilbert Meilaender, on how adoption offers lessons concerning the relationship between nature and grace; James L. Nolan, on what the observations of four distinguished foreign visitors can teach Americans about themselves; Joel Salatin, on how honoring the pigness of pigs enables us to more fully recognize the Godness of God; Michael Di Fuccia, on Owen Barfield’s understanding of the imagination; Robin Leaver, on clarifying some misconceptions about Martin Luther’s commitment to congregational singing; and Michael Marissen, on how J. S. Bach’s music conveys theological meaning.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 91

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Guests on Volume 91: John Witte, Jr., on the life and work of legal historian Harold Berman and on the revolutionary changes throughout the history of law in the West; Hugh Brogan, on Alexis de Tocqueville’s understanding of democracy, equality, liberty, free association, social status, and the dangers of centralized government; Daniel Ritchie, on Tocqueville’s analysis of the dangers of individualism (and how they might be avoided); Daniel Walker Howe, on the confidence in progress and Providence in early 19th-century America; George McKenna, on how the Puritan understanding of God’s purposes in history shaped American political culture; and Patrick Deneen, on the differences between Aristotelian and modern political philosophy and on how Wendell Berry’s thought demonstrates his identity as a "Kentucky Aristotelian."

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 79

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Guests on Volume 79: Carson Holloway on why sociobiology and evolutionary psychology are inadequate bases for sustaining political ideals; Peter Augustine Lawler on why we are more than "individuals" narrowly defined; Hadley Arkes on the difference, in law, between evidence from social scientific data and moral truths; Ben Witherington, III on why The Da Vinci Code's implausible account of history seems credible to many people; Christopher Shannon on Ivan Illich (Medical Nemesis) and the loss of belief in the possibility that suffering can be meaningful; Roger Lundin on how nature and experience replaced revelation as a source of authority (and why they fail to serve as such), and on the necessity of humility in writing biographies.