People

Bruce Herman

Bruce Herman is a painter and educator living and working in Gloucester, Massachusetts. Herman holds the Lothlórien Distinguished Chair in Fine Arts at Gordon College where he has taught and curated exhibitions since 1984. He completed both his undergraduate and graduate fine arts degrees at Boston University College of Fine Arts, where he worked with Philip Guston, David Aronson, and Arthur Polonsky.

Herman lectures widely and has had work published in many books, journals, and popular magazines––most recently in Through Your Eyes. His artwork has been exhibited in more than 25 solo shows and over 125 group exhibitions in eleven major cities including Boston, New York, Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles.

His work has also been shown internationally in many countries. Herman’s art is featured in many public and private collections including the Vatican Museum of Modern Religious Art in Rome; The Cincinnati Museum of Fine Arts; DeCordova Museum in Lincoln, Massachusetts; the Hammer Museum, Grunwald Print Collection, Los Angeles; the Cape Ann Museum, and in many universities throughout the United States and Canada.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 121

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 121: Daniel Gabelman, on how George MacDonald’s celebration of the “childlike” promotes levity and a joyful sense of play, rooted in filial trust of the Father; Curtis White, on the troubling enthusiasm for accounts of the human person that reduce us to mere meat and wetware; Michael Hanby, on why there is no “neutral” science, how all accounts of what science does and why contain metaphysical and theological assumptions; Alan Jacobs, on why the Book of Common Prayer has lived such a long and influential life; James K. A. Smith, on how some movements in modern philosophy provide resources for recovering an appreciation for the role of the body in knowing the world; and Bruce Herman and Walter Hansen, on Herman’s paintings and how conversing about works of art enables us to grow in understanding of the non-verbal meaning they convey.