People

Christian Smith

Christian Smith is the William R. Kenan, Jr., Professor of Sociology, director of the Center for the Study of Religion and Society, and director of the Center for Social Research at the University of Notre Dame. Previously, he taught at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Smith has been published in several periodicals such as the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Review of Religious Research, and Sociology of Religion. He has also written and edited numerous books, including: Moral, Believing Animals: Human Personhood and Culture (Oxford University Press, 2003), Soul Searching: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of American Teenagers (Oxford, 2005, 2009), Souls in Transition: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of Emerging Adults (Oxford, 2009), and Lost in Transition: The Dark Side of Emerging Adulthood (Oxford, 2011). His most recent book is entitled The Sacred Project of American Sociology (Oxford, 2014). 

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 126

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 126: James W. Skillen, on how all human cultural activity, including politics, should be understood in the context of God’s good purposes for Creation; Christian Smith, on how American sociology is not (as is claimed) a disinterested scientific endeavor but the pursuit of a sacred project driven by sacred commitments; B. W. Powe, on the unique “apocalyptic” insights of Marshall McLuhan and Northrop Frye; David Downing, on C. S. Lewis’s The Pilgrim’s Regress; Roger Scruton, on the inability for materialism to give a satisfactory account of our experience of the material world; and Jonathan Arnold, on the curious place of sacred music in a secular society.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 123

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 123: Nicholas M. Healy, on some of the practical and theological weaknesses in the writings of Stanley Hauerwas; Christian Smith, on the spiritual lives of emerging adults raised within the Roman Catholic Church and taught at Catholic schools; James K. A. Smith, on Charles Taylor's explanation (in The Secular Age) of how modern culture came to unlearn the theistic assumption of the West; Esther Lightcap Meek, on why pitting "objectivity" against "subjectivity" in describing the nature of knowledge isn't helpful, and on why all knowing involves making a commitment; Richard Viladesau, on the relationship between formal, propositional, academic theology and the theological expressions found in works of art and music; and Jeremy Begbie, on why theologians should be more interested in how music and modernity have interacted.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Free Demo Issue

Please stream or download our free demo issue — a representative selection of past interviews — to get a sense of what it’s like to subscribe.

If you wish to receive or to send a free Demo CD to a friend, email us at soundthinking@marshillaudio.org or call toll-free at 1.800.331.6407.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 112

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 112: Christian Smith, on why "emerging adults" feel compelled to keep all their options open, in life and in thought; David L. Schindler, on how modern liberalism fails to acknowledge the reality of God's love in the order of Creation; Sara Anson Vaux, on the moral vision of director Clint Eastwood; Melvyn Bragg, on the origins and profound cultural influence of the King James Bible; Timothy Larsen, on how Victorians were united in their preoccupation with the Bible, whether or not they believed in God; and Ralph C. Wood, on the sacramental vision of G. K. Chesterton, and on the enigmatic message of The Man Who Was Thursday.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 106

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 106: Adam Briggle, on how Leon Kass's leadership of the President's Council on Bioethics attempted to reframe public thinking about ethical matters; John C. Médaille, on why economics should be concerned with ethical matters from the bottom up; Christopher Page, on how the presence of choral music in the Church shaped the rise of the West; Christian Smith, on why sociologists need a richer understanding of human nature and human personhood and should recognize "love" as an essential human attribute; Herman Daly, on why he and Wendell Berry are disturbed by the lack of attention paid by classical economics to the realities of the material world; and Thomas Hibbs, on the dark nihilism in the films of Woody Allen.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 100

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 100: Jennifer Burns, on the life and legacy of Ayn Rand, "goddess of the market" and entrenched enemy of altruism; Christian Smith, on the aimless cultural world of "emerging adulthood" and on how it makes the idea of objective moral order implausible; and Dallas Willard, on why it's important to recover the conviction that religious beliefs involve real knowledge. In honor of the five score milestone, part two of the issue features a look back at the beginnings of the Journal and a few special excerpts of conversations with those early guests, including Peter Kreeft on Lewis, Huxley, and J.F.K. after death; P. D. James, on good and evil in fiction; James Davison Hunter, on culture wars; Paul McHugh, on when psychiatry loses its way; Ted Prescott, on nudity in art and advertising; Ed Knippers, on the powerful presence of the body; Martha Bayles, on pop and perverse modernism; Dominic Aquila, on Christopher Lasch; Gilbert Meilaender, on random kindness; Neil Postman, on technology and culture; and Alan Jacobs, on being maudlin in Madison County.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 75

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 75: Mark Malvasi, on John Lukacs, the meaning of the modern, and how to think about history; John Lukacs, on the roles of curiosity and language in the vocation of historians; Steve Talbott, on how communications technologies divert language from its richest possibilities; Christian Smith, on the spiritual lives and theological assumptions of American teenagers; Eugene Peterson, on the essential relationship between theology and spirituality, and on the narrative life of congregations; and Rolland Hein, on the life and imagination of George MacDonald.