People

Craig Holdrege

Craig Holdrege is the director of The Nature Institute in Ghent, New York, where he carries out research and teaches in adult education programs (www.natureinstitute.org). Craig has a Ph.D. in sustainability education from Prescott College in Arizona. He completed a program in phenomenological science at the Science Research Laboratory at the Goetheanum, Switzerland, and has a B.A. in philosophy from Beloit College. His studies of animals and plants as integrated beings have led to numerous publications. His books include Genetics and the Manipulation of Life: The Forgotten Factor of Context (1996), The Giraffe’s Long Neck: From Evolutionary Fable to Whole Organism (2005), and Beyond Biotechnology: The Barren Promise of Genetic Engineering (University of Kentucky Press, 2008). Craig leads seminars and workshops and gives lectures internationally.

MARS HILL AUDIO Anthology 11

Rediscovering the Organism: Science and Its Contexts

Available for mp3 purchase
Modern culture is profoundly shaped by science—by its methods, its products, and its public authority. The centrality of science in modern society affects how we think, what we think about, the kinds of conclusions we come to, and the kinds of assumptions that we hold—including assumptions about what sort of creatures we are and what sort of lives are most fitting for our nature. Theologian Lesslie Newbigin has argued that science has effectively eliminated “Why” questions from our culture. Modern Western people, he wrote, have “a disposition to believe that purpose has no place as a category of explanation in any exercise that claims to be ‘scientific,’ and thus to look for the explanation of everything, including both animal and human behavior, without reference to purpose.

This anthology features philosophers, theologians, historians, and research scientists, all of whom have thought deeply about the interaction of science with other disciplines and with the settings in which science is practiced and exerts its influence. One theme that emerges is how science in answering “How?” sometimes obscures the “What?” of specific things, as well as the “Why?” of all things. 1 hour 47 minutes. $6.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 92

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 92: Jake Halpern, on the ecosystem of celebrity and the complicated reasons why people seek to become famous; Stephen J. Nichols, on how the dynamics of American culture have shaped our understanding of who Jesus is; Richard M. Gamble, on resources for and the outlines of a theology of education; Peter J. Leithart, on how concerns from some postmodern thinkers echo the eschatological perspective of Solomon (as presented in the book of Ecclesiastes); Bill Vitek, on how wise living on the Earth requires the humble recognition of our ignorance as well as the application of knowledge; and Craig Holdrege, on lessons from Goethe about how we understand the rest of Creation as participants, not detached and potentially omniscient observers, and also on the "conversational" quality of our engagement with Creation.