People

Daniel M. Bell, Jr.

Daniel M. Bell, Jr. is an ordained Elder in The United Methodist Church. He is currently professor of Theological Ethics at Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary in Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Bell has taught as Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religion at Monmouth College, Illinois. Prior to that, he taught at Truman State University and Meredith College. A graduate of Stetson University, he earned the Master of Divinity degree from Duke Divinity School and the Doctor of Philosophy degree (in theology and ethics) from Duke University.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 118

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Guests on Volume 118: Gilbert Meilaender, on the ethical questions raised by anti-aging research, especially its most extreme forms in the "transhumanist" movement; Ron Highfield, on why the modern assumptions about personal identity, freedom, and human dignity create prejudices against the Gospel's account of God and the self; Mark Mitchell, on why gratitude and stewardship should be seen as fundamental political postures; Daniel M. Bell, Jr., on how capitalism nurtures the assumption of the autonomous self; Helen Rhee, on the centrality of almsgiving to Christian identity in the early Church; and Peter Brown, on how the early Church's wrestling with the questions of wealth and poverty steered a course between radical asceticism and careless indulgence.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 102

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 102: Daniel M. Bell, Jr., on recovering the view that the just war tradition is more about the shaping of character and virtue than a checklist for political leaders; Lew Daly, on how the discussion concerning faith-based initiatives raised larger issues about the identity of social groups in American society; Adam K. Webb, on whether the traditional personal and communal virtues in premodern village life must be abandoned for poverty to be alleviated; Stratford Caldecott, on how denying the reality of beauty is linked to a denial of the coherent meaning of Creation; James Matthew Wilson, on Jacques Maritain's pilgrimage to faith and his subsequent development of a rich philosophy of beauty; and Thomas Hibbs, on the similar projects of painters Georges Rouault (1871-1958) and Makoto Fujimura (b. 1960), and how they each resisted various confusions in modern art.