People

David Naugle

David Naugle is chair and professor of philosophy at Dallas Baptist University where he has worked for twelve years in both administrative and academic capacities. He earned a Th.D. in systematic theology, and a Ph.D. in humanities with concentrations in philosophy and English literature. He serves as a Fellow for the Wilberforce Forum (a Christian worldview think tank in Washington, D. C.) and is also editor of "The Worldview Church E-Newsletter." This newsletter, which is published by the Wilberforce Forum and scheduled to launch in February 2003, is designed to encourage Church leaders to implement a Christian worldview in their congregations. Naugle examines the importance of a Christian worldview from a demon's perspective in his paper "A New Screwtape Letter," the form of which imitates C. S. Lewis's The Screwtape Letters. The work, along with several of Naugle's academic papers, is available on-line in a pdf file (pieces are listed alphabetically).

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 96

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 96: David A. Smith, on the beginnings of the National Endowment for the Arts and the capacity of the arts in a democracy for combatting atomistic individualism; Kiku Adatto, on how images, words, and ideas interact in a visually saturated culture and on how the image of a person's face in a photograph has the capacity for intimate representation of inner personhood; Elvin T. Lim, on how presidential speeches have been dumbed down for decades and why presidents like it; David Naugle, on the deeper meaning of happiness, the disordering effects of sin, and the reordering of love made possible in our redemption; Richard Stivers, on the technologizing of all of life; and John Betz, on the critique of the Enlightenment offered by Johann Georg Hamann (1730-1788), and why it still matters to us.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 60

Guests on Volume 60: David Naugle, on the origins of the term "worldview," and the spiritual and religious significance of "worldview thinking" for Christians; D. G. Hart, on the distinctions between evangelicalism and confessional Protestantism; Dermot Quinn, on the historical wisdom of Christopher Dawson, and the skepticism of contemporary historians; Russell Hittinger, on how a right to privacy emerged and evolved in American constitutional law and on how a landmark federal court decision addressed physician-assisted suicide; Leon Kass, on why a commitment to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness is not enough to protect human dignity; and James Howard Kunstler, on how designing spaces that respect cars but not pedestrians has made so much of America unlovable if not unlivable.