People

David Wells

David Wells is the Andrew Mutch Distinguished Professor of Historical and Systematic Theology at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in South Hamilton, Massachusetts. He is the author of over a dozen books, including No Place for Truth, God in the Wasteland, and Losing Our Virtue: Why the Church Must Recover Its Moral Vision.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 82

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 82: Stephen Gardner on how modern culture weakens religion and establishes a new definition of the public; Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn on Tom Wolfe and Philip Rieff's diagnosis of cultural disorder; Wilfred McClay on how Philip Rieff's brilliant critique of modern disorder kept him from realizing a way out of our dilemma; David Wells on how Western culture has eclipsed fundamental assumptions about human nature and God; James K. A. Smith on the postmodern insight that our experience in the world requires interpretation (and that some interpretations are better than others); and Robert Littlejohn on how education should encourage wisdom and eloquence in students.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 33

Guests on Volume 33: Elizabeth Haiken, on Venus Envy: A History of Cosmetic Surgery; Patrick Glynn, on recovering belief; Thomas Howard, on C. S. Lewis's Till We Have Faces; David Wells, on how our culture distracts us from remembering moral nature; Peter Heslam, on Abraham Kuyper, Calvinist theologian and statesman; Suzanna Sherry, on the assault on truth in legal scholarship; Ted Libbey, on Felix Mendelssohn's oratorios, Elijah and Paulus; and David Wells, on the contrast between classic and postmodern spirituality.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 12

Guests on Volume 12: George Weigel, on posturing and prudence in pro-life politics; Don Eberly, on the inability of politics to cure cultural problems; David Wells, on recapturing a "weighty" understanding of God; Alan Jacobs, on the Christian conviction of poet Christina Rossetti; Ken Myers, on instances of naturalistic positivism in recent science journalism; Nancy Pearcey, on misunderstanding the history of science; Leon Kass, on the deeper meaning of eating; and John Hodges, on J. S. Bach's Christmas Oratorio.