People

Drew Trotter

Drew Trotter, a film critic, is the Executive Director of the Consortium of Christian Study Centers. He was for twenty-two years the Executive Director and President of the Center for Christian Study in Charlottesville, VA. He has taught biblical, theological, and cultural studies at the seminary level for more than fifteen years, and earned his Ph.D. in New Testament studies from Cambridge University. He is the regular movie essayist for the newsletter Critique and is the author of Interpreting the Epistle to the Hebrews (Baker, 1997).

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 14

Guests on Volume 14: Thomas Cahill, on the story of How the Irish Saved Civilization; Mark Noll, on the history of Evangelical anti-intellectualism; Paul Davies, on God and time; William Lane Craig, on problems in the thinking of Paul Davies; Alan Jacobs, on the moral dumbing down of Louisa May Alcott's novel in the movie version of Little Women; Drew Trotter, on the moral indifference of filmmaker Quentin Tarantino; Cornelius Plantinga, Jr., on the need for a recovery of the meaning of sin; Eugene Genovese, on learning from the Southern Agrarians; and Ted Libbey, on J. S. Bach's St. John Passion.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 7

Guests on Volume 7: Dean Kenyon, on his fight for academic freedom at San Francisco State University; Phillip Johnson, on scientists' intolerance toward theories about intelligent design; Jane Metcalfe, on technology and community; John Hodges, on sacred music by Ralph Vaughan Williams; Dominic Aquila, on the late cultural critic, Christopher Lasch; Robert Royal, on "Reinventing the American People," multiculturalism and the shaping of national identity; Ted Prescott, on the British realist painter Lucian Freud; and Drew Trotter, on Steven Spielberg's Oscar-winning Schindler's List.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 5

Guests on Volume 5: David Aikman, on his novel When the Almond Tree Blossoms, and on the perpetual temptations of totalitarianism; Edward Ericson, Jr., on Solzhenitsyn's moral foundation and his criticism of modern Western culture; James Pontuso, on the spiritual dimensions of freedom; James Finn, on the United Nations World Conference on human rights; Ken Myers, on L. A. Law's Bob Jones graduate, and on how TV promotes glibness; Ralph C. Wood, on the backslidden comedy of novelist Peter De Vries; Stephen Bates, on textbooks and the First Amendment in Hawkins County, Tennessee; and Drew Trotter, on director Martin Scorsese's The Age of Innocence.