People

Flannery O’Connor

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 22

Hillbilly Thomist: Flannery O'Connor & the Truth of Things

Available for mp3 purchase
In this Conversation, Ken Myers talks with Susan Srigley about how Flannery O’Connor’s perception of reality suffuses her fiction in ways that fit the views of how art works developed by Thomas Aquinas, views often summarized as “sacramental” or “incarnational.” And Ralph Wood discusses O’Connor’s acceptance of the limits placed in our lives by Providence, how limits may be a source of wisdom rather than frustration. 60 minutes. $6.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 73

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 73: Richard John Neuhaus, Nigel Cameron, Carlos F. Gomez, and Michael Uhlmann, on the meaning and value of human life, the vocation of medicine, the logic of autonomous individualism, and the temptation of suicide and euthanasia; Patrick Carey, on the perceptive (and peregrinating) thought of Orestes Brownson; John W. O'Malley, on the prophetic, academic, humanistic, and artistic vectors of Western culture; Patricia Owen, on what makes good children's books and on how the Newbery Medal winners have changed over time; Susan Srigley, on the sacramental and incarnational fiction of Flannery O'Connor; and Ralph C. Wood, on Flannery O'Connor as "hill-billy Thomist" and sympathizer with backwoods religion.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 37

Guests on Volume 37: Gregory Wolfe, on how "religious humanism" follows the model of the incarnation; Jill P. Baumgaertner, on violence and the grotesque in Flannery O'Connor; D. Bruce Lockerbie, on the struggle of many modern writers against religion; Roger Lundin, on Alfred Kazin's God and the American Writer; Donald McCullough, on the religious rootedness of courtesy; David Nye, on how technologies build cultural momentum in unexpected ways; Kathleen Powers Erickson, on the Spiritual Vision of Vincent Van Gogh; and Michael Marissen, on how J. S. Bach avoided anti-Judaism.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 3

Guests on Volume 3: Andrew Kimbrell, on the bioethical issues discussed in The Human Body Shop; Allan C. Carlson, on From Cottage to Workstation: The Family's Search for Social Harmony in the Industrial Age; Larry Woiwode, on Flannery O'Connor, John Updike, and what fiction is good for; Peter Kreeft, on the reasonableness of faith, the devilishness of deconstructionism, and The Snakebite Letters; Alan Jacobs, on The Children of Men by P. D. James; Thomas Morris, on Blaise Pascal and why people still ask the Big Questions; Jay Tolson, on how Walker Percy's search for authenticity led to his conversion; and John Hodges, on the popularity of Henryck Gorecki's Third Symphony.