People

Friedrich Nietzsche

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 105

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 105: Julian Young, on the historical context of Friedrich Nietzsche's ideas and on why he still believed in the necessity of religion; Perry L. Glanzer, on the failure of American universities to adequately address the challenge of moral formation; Kenda Creasy Dean, on why churches are to blame for the "moralistic therapeutic Deism" so common among teens; Brian Brock, on how the centrality of technology in Western culture encourages us to see the gift of Creation as merely "nature" awaiting our manipulation; Nicholas Carr, on how the distracted character of multi-tasking ruins reading and how social networking systems sustain a "transactional" view of relationships; and Alan Jacobs, on how the literary form of the essay reproduces the unpredictable way that our thoughts develop.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 50

Guests on Volume 50: Stanley Carlson-Thies, on the theology of "charitable choice"; Bruce S. Thornton, on the loss of ends and the exultation of appetite in the academy; A. J. Conyers, on the origins of the modern view of tolerance (and of Big Government); Stanton L. Jones, on various configurations of science, morality, and homosexuality; Arthur Holmes, on the history of Christianity and education in the liberal arts; Carson Holloway, on All Shook Up: Music, Passion, and Politics; Ted Prescott, on the popular paintings and the prophetic claims of Thomas Kinkade; and Glenn C. Arbery, on the achievement of form in literature.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 21

Guests on Volume 21: James Twitchell, on ways advertising shapes (and thins out) American culture; Lynne Cheney, on the politics of ideas in higher education; Peter Berkowitz, on how Friedrich Nietzsche was torn between certainty of the "death of God" and belief in the divinity of truth; Ron Hansen, on what makes good fiction; Frederica Mathewes-Green, on "The America We Seek," an important pro-life manifesto; Robert Higgs, on how professional sports have lost a sense of play; Terry Eastland, on why affirmative action is ending; and Ted Libbey, on Brahms's German Requiem.