People

George Marsden

George Marsden is Professor of History, Emeritus at the University of Notre Dame. His research interests have covered American fundamentalism and evangelicalism as well as the role of Christianity in higher education. He is the author of Fundamentalism and American Culture (2nd ed. 2006), The Outrageous Idea of Christian Scholarship and The Soul of the American University: From Protestant Establishment to Established Nonbelief.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 133

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 133: Darío Fernández-Morera, on the real history of Islamic Spain in the Middle Ages; Francis Oakley, on the enduring belief in sacral kingship and the secularization of politics in the late Middle Ages; Oliver O'Donovan, on why all political authority can only be properly understood by way of analogy with God’s kingship; Thomas Storck, on the conflicts between “Americanism” and Catholic social teaching; John Safranek, on the self-contradictory character of modern liberalism; Brian Brock, on the challenges and opportunities of being a “Church theologian” in a secular university; George Marsden, on the birth and influential life of C. S. Lewis’s Mere Christianity.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 122

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 122: N. T. Wright, on the significance of narrative awareness as a gesture towards participating in God's on-going narrative and away from cultural captivity; George Marsden, on American public intellectuals of the 1950s and their anxieties concerning national purpose; Makoto Fujimura, on modernist art, Jacques Maritain, and the Eastern pictorial tradition; David Bentley Hart, on why historic theism (and all of its metaphysical claims) explains reality better than materialism does; and Thomas Lessl, on the institutional "Copernican revolution" of the university and its attending warfare mythology as enduring perpetuators of the war between science and religion.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 65

Guests on Volume 65: Stephen G. Post, on why there should be more room for public forms of religious expression; Glenn C. Altschuler, on the advent of rock 'n' roll, and the various fears it created; Mark Oppenheimer, on the importance of style and the rise of radical informality; Johnny Cash, on faith, vocation, the Incarnation, and the Last Supper; George Marsden, on how Jonathan Edwards understood world history and the American experience; and Julian Johnson, on various misunderstandings about classical music, the differences between music as art and music as commodity, and on expectations of immediate gratification in music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 25

Guests on Volume 25: Douglas Groothuis, on The Soul in Cyberspace; Harold Bloom, on the Gnostic view of creation and fall; Gilbert Meilaender, on the outlines of a distinctively Christian bioethics; Susan Bergman, on martyrs and the meaning of suffering; Paul Marshall, on international persecution of Christians; George Marsden, on The Outrageous Idea of Christian Scholarship; Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, on divorce as a democratic institution; and Leonard Payton, on The Pilgrim's Progress by Ralph Vaughn Williams.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 10

Guests on Volume 10: Paul Vitz, on the meaning of freedom and the dangers of "selfism"; Robert Wuthnow, on small groups and the changing understanding and practice of Christian faith; Marjorie Mead, on Shadowlands and the real personalities of C. S. Lewis and Joy Davidman; Martha Bayles, on why modern artists feel compelled to shock; Ken Myers, on our culture's disturbing fascination with death; Ted Prescott, on the spirit and contemporary manifestations of Surrealism; George Marsden, on the establishment of nonbelief in American universities; and John Hodges, on Gregorian chant.