People

Jeremy Beer

Jeremy Beer is a founding partner for American Philanthropic. Prior to American Philanthropic, Beer worked for the Intercollegiate Studies Institute as vice president of publishing and information systems. He also served as editor in chief for ISI Books. He has written numerous articles on politics, culture, and philanthropy for publications such as Front Porch RepublicThe American ConservativeFirst ThingsTouchstone, and the Utne Reader. He is the author of America Moved: Booth Tarkington's Memoirs of Time and Place, 1869-1928 (2015) and Philanthropic Revolution: An Alternative History of American Charity (2015).

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 19

Jeremy Beer, "On Christopher Lasch"

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(From Modern Age, Fall 2005)

In this biographical sketch, Jeremy Beer describes the intellectual trajectory of cultural historian, Christopher Lasch, whose career spanned from the 1960s through the early 1990s. Beer recounts how, despite growing up in a “militantly secular” home and, throughout his career, sympathetically grappling with the works of Marx and Freud, Christopher Lasch distanced himself from the leftist “radical intellectuals,” whose version of progressivism did not coincide with Lasch’s understanding of a healthy democracy. In his scholarship and criticism, Lasch was concerned about democracy, both as an achievable ideal and as an imperfect reality. He rejected the Left-Right dualism of American politics, arguing that the ostensibly opposing ideologies were merely two sides of the same coin that amounted to the refusal to acknowledge human limitations. Lasch’s diagnosis of the modern, “anxiously narcissistic” self involved a sharp critique of the culture that produced it, namely, a culture that condoned the conquest of nature through scientific, technological, and economic methods without any regard for naturally or institutionally based limits on human freedom. 55 minutes. $2.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 128

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Guests on Volume 128: Matthew Crawford, on how skillful engagement with the material world provides the setting for true individuality; Carlo Lancellotti, on Augusto Del Noce's critique of modernity; James Turner, on the origins of the humanities in the venerable discipline of philology; Rod Dreher, on what he learned from Dante’s Divine Comedy; Mark Evan Bonds, on the idea of "absolute music"; and Jeremy Beer, on the neglected accomplishments of Booth Tarkington.