People

Jeremy Begbie

Jeremy Begbie is the Thomas A. Langford Research Professor of Theology at Duke Divinity School and the director of Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts. He has also taught at the Universities of St Andrews and Cambridge. He specializes in the interface between theology and the arts and is the author of several books including: Music, Modernity, and God: Essays in Listening (Oxford, 2014), Resounding Truth: Christian Wisdom in the World of Music (Baker Academic, 2007), Sounding the Depths: Theology Through the Arts (SCM, 2002), Voicing Creation's Praise: Towards a Theology of the Arts (Bloomsbury T&T Clark, 2000), and Theology, Music and Time (Cambridge, 2000).

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 123

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Guests on Volume 123: Nicholas M. Healy, on some of the practical and theological weaknesses in the writings of Stanley Hauerwas; Christian Smith, on the spiritual lives of emerging adults raised within the Roman Catholic Church and taught at Catholic schools; James K. A. Smith, on Charles Taylor's explanation (in The Secular Age) of how modern culture came to unlearn the theistic assumption of the West; Esther Lightcap Meek, on why pitting "objectivity" against "subjectivity" in describing the nature of knowledge isn't helpful, and on why all knowing involves making a commitment; Richard Viladesau, on the relationship between formal, propositional, academic theology and the theological expressions found in works of art and music; and Jeremy Begbie, on why theologians should be more interested in how music and modernity have interacted.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Free Demo Issue

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MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 94

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 94: Maggie Jackson, on how multitasking exalts efficiency and promises the overcoming of bodily limitations as time is restructured and on the importance of attentiveness in sustaining personal and social order; Mark Bauerlein, on how technologies have rearranged the social lives of teens (and their expectations of education); Tim Clydesdale, on what the first year in college means for teens; Andy Crouch, on the physical basis of cultural life and how "culture making" is done; and Jeremy Begbie, on how music is a way of engaging with the order in Creation and on how writing and hearing music involves a recognition of likenesses in Creation and the exercise of "hyper-hearing."

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 64

Guests on Volume 64: Paul Berman, on the links between Islamism and other totalitarian utopias; Jean Bethke Elshtain, on justice and the vocation of government, and on maintaining a sense of the holy; Hadley Arkes, on natural rights and "inadvertant treason," and on the rise of a new jurisprudence in Griswold v. Connecticut and Roe v. Wade; Ralph C. Wood, on the place of the seven virtues in J. R. R. Tolkien's vision of the moral life in The Lord of the Rings; and Jeremy Begbie, on what we learn about time, theology, and the structure of creation from the experience of music.