People

John Hodges

John Hodges is founder and director of the Center for Western Studies, and serves as scholar-in-residence for the National Fellows movement. Past Associate Professor of Culture and the Arts at Crichton College, he was conductor of the Ars Nova chamber orchestra and worked as a professional conductor from 1983-2009. Hodges wrote an essay about John Tavener's music which appeared in the Summer 1995 issue of Image.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 17

Guests on Volume 17: Alan Jacobs, on the seafaring fiction of novelist Patrick O'Brian; Barry Sanders, on the deeper dynamics of literacy; Mark Slouka, on bizarre Gnostic temptations in cyberspace; Alan Ehrenhalt, on how valuing choice hurts community; Geoffrey T. Holtz, on twenty-somethings and the shape of family life; Mardi Keyes, on dubious assumptions about the nature of adolescence; W. Bradford Wilcox, on tradition and belief; Glenn Loury, on race and relationships; and John Hodges, on the influence of Russian Orthodoxy in the music of John Tavener.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 12

Guests on Volume 12: George Weigel, on posturing and prudence in pro-life politics; Don Eberly, on the inability of politics to cure cultural problems; David Wells, on recapturing a "weighty" understanding of God; Alan Jacobs, on the Christian conviction of poet Christina Rossetti; Ken Myers, on instances of naturalistic positivism in recent science journalism; Nancy Pearcey, on misunderstanding the history of science; Leon Kass, on the deeper meaning of eating; and John Hodges, on J. S. Bach's Christmas Oratorio.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 10

Guests on Volume 10: Paul Vitz, on the meaning of freedom and the dangers of "selfism"; Robert Wuthnow, on small groups and the changing understanding and practice of Christian faith; Marjorie Mead, on Shadowlands and the real personalities of C. S. Lewis and Joy Davidman; Martha Bayles, on why modern artists feel compelled to shock; Ken Myers, on our culture's disturbing fascination with death; Ted Prescott, on the spirit and contemporary manifestations of Surrealism; George Marsden, on the establishment of nonbelief in American universities; and John Hodges, on Gregorian chant.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 7

Guests on Volume 7: Dean Kenyon, on his fight for academic freedom at San Francisco State University; Phillip Johnson, on scientists' intolerance toward theories about intelligent design; Jane Metcalfe, on technology and community; John Hodges, on sacred music by Ralph Vaughan Williams; Dominic Aquila, on the late cultural critic, Christopher Lasch; Robert Royal, on "Reinventing the American People," multiculturalism and the shaping of national identity; Ted Prescott, on the British realist painter Lucian Freud; and Drew Trotter, on Steven Spielberg's Oscar-winning Schindler's List.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 4

Guests on Volume 4: Alan Jacobs, on The Bridges of Madison County by Robert James Waller, and why sentimentalism in life and in art is a moral problem; Alzina Stone Dale, on unknown fiction by Dorothy Sayers, and how she was a certain kind of feminist; Ken Myers, on composer John Tavener, and on religious symbolism in high fashion; Paul McHugh, on how psychiatrists allow themselves to be swept up by the Zeitgeist; Herbert Schlossberg, on renewal in the churches and in society; and John Hodges, on Leonard Bernstein's view of religion and music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 3

Guests on Volume 3: Andrew Kimbrell, on the bioethical issues discussed in The Human Body Shop; Allan C. Carlson, on From Cottage to Workstation: The Family's Search for Social Harmony in the Industrial Age; Larry Woiwode, on Flannery O'Connor, John Updike, and what fiction is good for; Peter Kreeft, on the reasonableness of faith, the devilishness of deconstructionism, and The Snakebite Letters; Alan Jacobs, on The Children of Men by P. D. James; Thomas Morris, on Blaise Pascal and why people still ask the Big Questions; Jay Tolson, on how Walker Percy's search for authenticity led to his conversion; and John Hodges, on the popularity of Henryck Gorecki's Third Symphony.