People

John Polkinghorne

John Polkinghorne is a Fellow of the Royal Society, a Fellow (and former president) of Queens' College, Cambridge, and a Canon Theologian of Liverpool Cathedral. Before studying for the Anglican priesthood at Westcott House, he served as a lecturer, reader, and professor at Cambridge. He has also served on the Doctrine Commission of the Church of England and the Medical Ethics Committee of the British Medical Association. He earned his PhD and MA from Trinity College Cambridge.
An extended version of John Polkinghorne's interview on science and theology is available as a MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation. Information about "Science and Theology from the Bottom Up: Sir John Polkinghorne on Enriching the Dialogue" is listed here.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 21

Science and Theology from the Bottom Up: Sir John Polkinghorne on Enriching the Dialogue

Available for mp3 purchase
In 1979, a much-respected physicist named John Polkinghorne resigned from his position at Cambridge. Just five years earlier he had been honored for his remarkable achievements in mathematical physics (he had been part of the team that discovered the quark) by being appointed a Fellow of the Royal Society. Polkinghorne was departing the environs of this profound and mysterious reflection on the nature of reality for a vocation no less intellectually and personally challenging: the study of theology and service as an Anglican priest. One of the benefits to the public of Polkinghorne’s twin interests in science and theology has been the remarkable series of books he has written since 1983, beginning with The Way the World Is, continuing with the publication of his 1993 Gifford Lectures (published as The Faith of a Physicist: Reflections of a Bottom-Up Thinker) and most recently Science and the Trinity: The Christian Encounter with Reality (Yale). Sir John Polkinghorne talks about the main themes of this book in this Conversation. 54 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 72

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 72: John Polkinghorne, on lessons for theology learned from the inductive nature of the work of science; Francesca Aran Murphy, on the efforts of 20th-century Catholic and French philosopher Étienne Gilson to reconcile faith and reason; James Hitchcock, on the history of the Supreme Court's decisions regarding religious practice and liberty; Wilfred McClay, on Nathaniel Hawthorne's vision of the intractability of human failings and the possibilities of the American experiment, and on the theme of place and communal obligation in Nathaniel Hawthorne's writing; Philip McFarland, on how Hawthorne's sensitivity to the darker side of human nature makes him perennially instructive; and David Hackett Fischer, on the history of how Americans have understood and symbolized freedom and liberty.