People

Larry Woiwode

Larry Woiwode, a novelist and poet, is the author of Poppa John, Born Brothers, Acts, and the memoir What I Think I Did: A Season of Survival in Two Acts.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 111

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 111: Siva Vaidhyanathan, on why trusting Google to organize the world's knowledge is an odd (and dangerous) thing to do; John Fea, on the history of the idea of America as a Christian nation and on how the Founders were—as statesmen—less interested in the truth of religion than in its political utility; Ross Douthat, on how commitment to historical Christian orthodoxy has eroded among American religious institutions since the 1960s; Ian Ker, on why G. K. Chesterton deserves wider recognition as a significant literary critic; Larry Woiwode, on how his decision to become a writer grew out of a desire to make connections with other people; and Dana Gioia, on the remarkable life of poet John Donne and how his spiritual and intellectual struggles created the conditions for his unique poetic voice.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 48

Guests on Volume 48: Jon Butler, on the United States as a modern society—in 1776; Gary Cross, on An All-Consuming Century: Why Commercialism Won in Modern America; Zygmunt Bauman, on the loss of permanence and solidity; Pico Iyer, on The Global Soul: Jet Lag, Shopping Malls, and the Search for Home; Richard Stivers, on sex and violence in media and the rule of technology; Larry Woiwode, on stories and giving form to experience; Alan Jacobs, on Philip Pullman's "His Dark Materials" trilogy; and James Trott, on poetry and piety.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 3

Guests on Volume 3: Andrew Kimbrell, on the bioethical issues discussed in The Human Body Shop; Allan C. Carlson, on From Cottage to Workstation: The Family's Search for Social Harmony in the Industrial Age; Larry Woiwode, on Flannery O'Connor, John Updike, and what fiction is good for; Peter Kreeft, on the reasonableness of faith, the devilishness of deconstructionism, and The Snakebite Letters; Alan Jacobs, on The Children of Men by P. D. James; Thomas Morris, on Blaise Pascal and why people still ask the Big Questions; Jay Tolson, on how Walker Percy's search for authenticity led to his conversion; and John Hodges, on the popularity of Henryck Gorecki's Third Symphony.