People

Mark Noll

Mark Noll specializes in the history of Christianity in the United States. He is research professor of history at Regent College in Vancouver and the Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Notre Dame. Before teaching at Notre Dame, Noll taught history at Wheaton College for 25 years. He is the author of many books, including A History of Christianity in the United States and Canada, The Scandal of the Evangelical Mind, and Turning Points: Decisive Moments in the History of Christianity.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 136

Guests on Volume 136: Thomas Albert Howard, on the history of commemorating the Reformation; Mark Noll, on how the Reformers would want to be remembered; Andrew Pettegree, on how Martin Luther transformed the printing industry; Peter Leithart, on the biblical basis for the unity of the Church; Norm Klassen, on the political theology implicit in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales; James Litton, on the life and work of hymnologist, Erik Routley; and Joseph O’Brien, on the neglected literary achievements of J. F. Powers.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 110

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 110: Kevin Belmonte, on how G. K. Chesterton embraced a "defiant joy" in spite of the cynical pessimism of many of his contemporaries; David Lyle Jeffrey and Gregory Maillet, on why Christians cannot afford to regard literature as a mere entertaining diversion; Mark Noll, on what motivates anti-intellectualism among Christians and why it is a theologically indefensible prejudice; Alan Jacobs, on W. H. Auden's understanding of the vocation of "poet" and on the spiritual and historical background to Auden's 1947 book-length poem, The Age of Anxiety; and Jonathan Chaplin, on the outlines and sources of the social and political thought of Herman Dooyeweerd and on his understanding of the relationship between theology and Christian philosophy.

MARS HILL AUDIO Anthology 8

The Vocation of Knowledge: Higher Education and the Difference Christ Makes

In this Anthology, Mark Noll (The Future of Christian Learning) describes why serious Christian learning requires a confidence that the Gospel has broad social and intellectual consequences. Norman Klassen and Jens Zimmermann (The Passionate Intellect: Incarnational Humanism and the Future of University Education) explain why the term "Christian humanism" is especially apt in describing the aims of Christian higher education. James K. A. Smith (Desiring the Kingdom: Worship, Worldview, and Cultural Formation) develops the idea that education is more about formation than information, and that we are formed by our participation in liturgies, whether at church or at the mall. 78 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 97

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 97: Mark Noll, on how Christian higher education is aided by a commitment to something like "Christendom," a commitment to the assumption that the Gospel has consequences for all of life and all of social experience; Stanley Fish, on how university professors should refrain from bringing their own political, philosophical, and religious commitments into the classroom; James Peters, on how Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Pascal, and many others had an understanding of the nature and purpose of reason quite different from the common modern understanding; Scott Moore, on cultivating an understanding of politics that goes beyond mere statecraft, and on the limits of the notion of "rights"; and Makoto Fujimura, on how his work as a painter is enriched by writing, why artists need to cultivate an attentiveness to many things, and how visual language expresses experience.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 81

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 81: Nigel Cameron on the lack of ethical reflection in public policy on technology; Joel James Shuman on beliefs about God's nature and purposes informing how we think about sickness and medicine; Brian Volck on embodied life, stories, and how medical practice involves attending to the stories of the bodies of patients; Russell Hittinger on the modern state giving rise to modern Catholic social thought; Mark Noll on learning to think about law and politics from earlier Christians who lived in very different political circumstances; and Stephen Miller on the factors that sustain the art of conversation, and why it's a dying art.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 55

Guests on Volume 55: John Kelsay, on Islam, the West, and the threat of secularism; Robert George, on Oliver Wendell Holmes and the rise of legal realism; Michael McConnell, on Christian responses to the dominant theories of law in the 20th century; Mark Noll, on The Old Religion in a New World: The History of North American Christianity; J. C. Whitehouse, on Georges Bernanos and the mystery of the human person; and Paul Woodruff, on recovering the virtue of reverence.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 14

Guests on Volume 14: Thomas Cahill, on the story of How the Irish Saved Civilization; Mark Noll, on the history of Evangelical anti-intellectualism; Paul Davies, on God and time; William Lane Craig, on problems in the thinking of Paul Davies; Alan Jacobs, on the moral dumbing down of Louisa May Alcott's novel in the movie version of Little Women; Drew Trotter, on the moral indifference of filmmaker Quentin Tarantino; Cornelius Plantinga, Jr., on the need for a recovery of the meaning of sin; Eugene Genovese, on learning from the Southern Agrarians; and Ted Libbey, on J. S. Bach's St. John Passion.