People

Norman Wirzba

Norman Wirzba is Professor of Theology, Ecology, and Agrarian Studies at Duke Divinity School. He is the author of Food and Faith: A Theology of Eating (2011), The Paradise of God (2007) and Living the Sabbath (2006), among other titles. He has also edited several books, including The Essential Agrarian Reader: The Future of Culture, Community, and the Land (2004) and The Art of the Commonplace: Wendell Berry's Agrarian Essays (2002). He lectures widely on topics related to ecology, agriculture and food systems as they are philosophically and theologically understood.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 129

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 129: Nicholas Carr, on how automation technologies make our lives easier — while detaching us from the practices of engaging the world that are most fulfilling for us; Robert Pogue Harrison, on the challenges of nurturing the inner lives and loves of our children to enable them to receive the legacies of our culture; R. J. Snell, on how the vice of acedia denies the being of Creation; Norman Wirzba, on how a Scriptural imagination allows us to perceive the world as Creation (not just as nature); Philip Zaleski and Carol Zaleski, on how the Inklings were critical of modernity in the interest of restoring Western culture to its Christian roots; and Peter Phillips, on the “tintinnabuli” style of composition in the works of Arvo Pärt.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Free Demo Issue

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MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 113

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 113: Steven Shapin, on whether or not there is a single thing called "science," and whether scientists are united by a single "scientific method"; Arthur Boers, on why the ways in which technologies shape our lives should be recognized as spiritual and pastoral challenges; Christine Pohl, on why a deliberate commitment to certain shared practices is necessary for the sustaining of community; Norman Wirzba, on how attentiveness to our eating and our care of the land are central aspects of culture and of godly faith; Craig Bartholomew, on carelessness concerning embodied experience and our "crisis of place"; and David I. Smith, on how the forms of pedagogical practices ought to be crafted to correspond to the content of teaching.