People

Paul Marshall

Paul Marshall is a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute'sĀ Center for Religious Freedom. Dr. Marshall hasĀ held several professorships, including at the University of Toronto, the Free University of Amsterdam, and the Institute for Christian Studies, Toronto, where he taught political science, law, philosophy and theology. He is the author of A Kind of Life Imposed on Man: Vocation and Social Order from Tyndale to Locke and Their Blood Cries Out.

Paul Marshall has also been featured on the MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation "Life Work: On the Christian Idea of Calling." A short description of this Conversation is listed here.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 13

Life Work: On the Christian Idea of Calling

Available for mp3 purchase
Paul Marshall, author of A Kind of Life Imposed on Man, discusses how society and the Church have understood work throughout history, and what positive ramifications we might expect to see if Christians began to understand their life at work as part of their life in Christ. On part two, Os Guinness, author of The Call, explains how vocation and identity have lost their theological moorings among Christians. 62 minutes $6.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 30

Guests on Volume 30: Glenn Stanton, on the health of marriages and the health of society; Caroline J. Simon, on love, destiny, and imagination; Paul Marshall, on the theological meaning of vocation; David Lowenthal, on American Constitutional design and the need for virtue; Reinder Van Til, on Lost Daughters: Recovered Memory Therapy and the People It Hurts; John Ellis, on Literature Lost: Social Agendas and the Corruption of the Humanities; and Clyde Kilby, on C. S. Lewis and the roles of reason and imagination.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 25

Guests on Volume 25: Douglas Groothuis, on The Soul in Cyberspace; Harold Bloom, on the Gnostic view of creation and fall; Gilbert Meilaender, on the outlines of a distinctively Christian bioethics; Susan Bergman, on martyrs and the meaning of suffering; Paul Marshall, on international persecution of Christians; George Marsden, on The Outrageous Idea of Christian Scholarship; Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, on divorce as a democratic institution; and Leonard Payton, on The Pilgrim's Progress by Ralph Vaughn Williams.