People

Peter Phillips

Peter Phillips has made an impressive if unusual reputation for himself in dedicating his life’s work to the research and performance of Renaissance polyphony. He studied at Oxford with David Wulstan and Denis Arnold and founded the Tallis Scholars in 1973, with whom he has now appeared in over 1750 concerts and made over 50 discs, encouraging interest in Renaissance polyphony all over the world. As a conductor Phillips has appeared with the Collegium Vocale of Ghent, the Netherlands Chamber Choir, the Choeur de Chambre de Namur, Intrada of Moscow, Musica Reservata of Barcelona, the Tudor Choir of Seattle, and the BBC Singers. He is also Artistic Director of the Tallis Scholars Summer Schools. Phillips is also well-known as a writer. For 29 years he has contributed a regular music column to The Spectator and is owner and Publisher of The Musical Times, the oldest continuously published music journal in the world. His first book, English Sacred Music 1549–1649, was published by Gimell in 1991, while his second, What We Really Do, an unblinking account of what touring is like, alongside insights about the make-up and performance of polyphony, was first published in 2003. He has made numerous television and radio broadcasts and was appointed a Reed Rubin Director of Music and Bodley Fellow at Merton College, Oxford. In 2005 Peter Phillips was made a Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Minister of Culture, a decoration intended to honour individuals who have contributed to the understanding of French culture in the world.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 129

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 129: Nicholas Carr, on how automation technologies make our lives easier — while detaching us from the practices of engaging the world that are most fulfilling for us; Robert Pogue Harrison, on the challenges of nurturing the inner lives and loves of our children to enable them to receive the legacies of our culture; R. J. Snell, on how the vice of acedia denies the being of Creation; Norman Wirzba, on how a Scriptural imagination allows us to perceive the world as Creation (not just as nature); Philip Zaleski and Carol Zaleski, on how the Inklings were critical of modernity in the interest of restoring Western culture to its Christian roots; and Peter Phillips, on the “tintinnabuli” style of composition in the works of Arvo Pärt.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 119

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 119: Mary Eberstadt, on how the decline of formation of natural families has made Christian belief less plausible and contributed to the secularization of Europe; Allan Bevere, on why the claim by “empire criticism” that the letter to the Colossians is a veiled repudiation of Roman imperial hubris is mistaken; Peter J. Leithart, on how the Bible evaluates empires in light of their relationship with the people of God; Steven Boyer, on why “mystery” is a necessary category in Christian theology; Karen Dieleman, on how different liturgical practices of Victorian congregationalism, Anglo-Catholicism, and Roman Catholicism influenced the poetry of Elizabeth Barret Browning, Christina Rossetti, and Adelaide Proctor; and Peter Phillips, on the founding of The Tallis Scholars and the peculiar beauty of Renaissance polyphony.