Quentin Schultze

Quentin Schultze, editor of the anthology American Evangelicals and the Mass Media: Perspectives on the Relationship Between American Evangelicals and the Mass Media and author of Redeeming Television: How TV Changes Christians—How Christians Can Change TV, is a professor of communications arts and sciences at Calvin College and received their Presidential Award for Exemplary Teaching in 2000. He is also a special consultant for the Gospel Communications Network and has been interviewed by, among others, CNN and CBS.


Volume 68

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 68: Murray Milner, Jr., on American teenagers, schools, and the culture of consumption, and on how the choices of parents create the institutional framework for the lives of adolescents; Steven C. Vryhof, on faith-based schools and the maintaining of community; Douglas J. Schuurman, on recovering the Reformation's vision of vocation as neighbor-love and instrument of providence; Robert Gagnon, on Biblical teaching about homosexuality and how it is being ignored; Richard Stivers, on the role of technologies and "technique" in creating a sense of loneliness; and Quentin Schultze, on the role of religious paradigms in the American understanding of mass media.


Volume 59

Guests on Volume 59: Ron Hansen, on how novelists discover the themes of their writing; Bernard Lewis, on the history of Islamic resentment toward the West; Alan Jacobs, on Michael Chabon's Summerland and Cornelia Funke's The Thief Lord; Adrienne Chaplin, on Art and Soul: Signposts for Christians in the Arts and on the place and responsibility of Christian artists in their communities; Todd Gitlin, on how the torrent of images and sounds overwhelms our lives; and Quentin Schultze, on practical disciplines to live well in the midst of intrusive communications technology.


Volume 1

Guests on Volume 1: D. G. Hart, on Oliver Stone's JFK and why film has trouble relating historical realities; Peter Kreeft, on Between Heaven and Hell, a post-death dialogue among John F. Kennedy, C. S. Lewis, and Aldous Huxley; Nigel Cameron, on the loss of the Hippocratic tradition in medicine; Ted Prescott, on the life and work of the late English painter Francis Bacon; Quentin Schultze, on Pat Robertson's plans to begin a 24-hour game show TV channel; James Davison Hunter, on Culture Wars: The Struggle to Define America; Gregory Wolfe, on Mark Helprin's novel, A Soldier of the Great War; Edward Mendelson, on how poet W. H. Auden responded to modern culture; and Ted Libbey, on soprano Kathleen Battle.