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Quentin Schultze

Quentin Schultze, editor of the anthology American Evangelicals and the Mass Media: Perspectives on the Relationship Between American Evangelicals and the Mass Media and author of Redeeming Television: How TV Changes Christians—How Christians Can Change TV, is a professor of communications arts and sciences at Calvin College and received their Presidential Award for Exemplary Teaching in 2000. He is also a special consultant for the Gospel Communications Network and has been interviewed by, among others, CNN and CBS.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 68

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 68: Murray Milner, Jr., on American teenagers, schools, and the culture of consumption, and on how the choices of parents create the institutional framework for the lives of adolescents; Steven C. Vryhof, on faith-based schools and the maintaining of community; Douglas J. Schuurman, on recovering the Reformation's vision of vocation as neighbor-love and instrument of providence; Robert Gagnon, on Biblical teaching about homosexuality and how it is being ignored; Richard Stivers, on the role of technologies and "technique" in creating a sense of loneliness; and Quentin Schultze, on the role of religious paradigms in the American understanding of mass media.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 59

Guests on Volume 59: Ron Hansen, on how novelists discover the themes of their writing; Bernard Lewis, on the history of Islamic resentment toward the West; Alan Jacobs, on Michael Chabon's Summerland and Cornelia Funke's The Thief Lord; Adrienne Chaplin, on Art and Soul: Signposts for Christians in the Arts and on the place and responsibility of Christian artists in their communities; Todd Gitlin, on how the torrent of images and sounds overwhelms our lives; and Quentin Schultze, on practical disciplines to live well in the midst of intrusive communications technology.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 1

Guests on Volume 1: D. G. Hart, on Oliver Stone's JFK and why film has trouble relating historical realities; Peter Kreeft, on Between Heaven and Hell, a post-death dialogue among John F. Kennedy, C. S. Lewis, and Aldous Huxley; Nigel Cameron, on the loss of the Hippocratic tradition in medicine; Ted Prescott, on the life and work of the late English painter Francis Bacon; Quentin Schultze, on Pat Robertson's plans to begin a 24-hour game show TV channel; James Davison Hunter, on Culture Wars: The Struggle to Define America; Gregory Wolfe, on Mark Helprin's novel, A Soldier of the Great War; Edward Mendelson, on how poet W. H. Auden responded to modern culture; and Ted Libbey, on soprano Kathleen Battle.