People

Robert George

Robert P. George is McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence at Princeton University and the Director of the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions. He is also a member of the President's Bioethics Council. He is the author of Making Men Moral: Civil Liberties and Public Morality.

Additional information about Robert George is available through the web pages of ISI Books.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 117

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 117: Matthew Dickerson, on the likenesses between Beowulf and three of Tolkien’s heroes, and on how (despite Peter Jackson’s rendition) The Lord of the Rings is more interested in virtue than in military exploits; Jennifer Woodruff Tait, on how assumptions about the nature of moral knowledge—derived from the school of common-sense realism—compelled Victorian Methodists and others to substitute grape juice for wine in celebrating the Lord’s Supper; Jeffry Davis and Philip Ryken, on why the liberal arts ought to be recognized as a calling that enriches Christian living; and Robert George, on the consequences of redefining marriage.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 55

Guests on Volume 55: John Kelsay, on Islam, the West, and the threat of secularism; Robert George, on Oliver Wendell Holmes and the rise of legal realism; Michael McConnell, on Christian responses to the dominant theories of law in the 20th century; Mark Noll, on The Old Religion in a New World: The History of North American Christianity; J. C. Whitehouse, on Georges Bernanos and the mystery of the human person; and Paul Woodruff, on recovering the virtue of reverence.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 22

Guests on Volume 22: Andrew Delbanco, on how American culture has effaced the idea of evil; Michael Uhlmann, on two appellate court cases concerning the matter of doctor-assisted suicide; Carlos F. Gomez, on why some American doctors have embraced the idea of killing their patients; Michael Sandel, on the dangers of seeing democracy merely as morally neutral "procedures" to adjudicate differences; Hadley Arkes, on how arguments for legalizing same-gender marriages go further than their advocates would like; and Robert George, on why marriage is an intrinsic good.