People

Robert Jenson

Robert W. Jenson is a professor of religion at the Center for Theological Inquiry at Princeton Theological Seminary, having taught at both St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota, and Lutheran Theological Seminary in Gettysburg. He also serves as associate director of the Center for Catholic and Evangelical Theology. He is the author of an anthology of short pieces entitled Essays in Theology of Culture, and the co-editor of a volume entitled Either/Or: The Gospel or Neopaganism.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 17

Robert W. Jenson, "How the World Lost Its Story"

Available for mp3 purchase
(from First Things, October 1993)

In this article, theologian Robert W. Jenson describes how a postmodern world is characterized by the loss of a conviction that we inhabit a “narratable world” that exists coherently outside of ourselves. Although modernity — as opposed to postmodernity — presupposed in its arts and philosophy this narratable world, it did so while at the same time discarding the Judeo-Christian framework that enabled such a supposition in the first place. Increasingly, as the arts prefigured and now as the general culture at large displays, the experience of and confidence in such a coherent narrative has broken down into fragments. How then is the Church to respond to a world that has lost its story? In Jenson's words: “If the church does not find her hearers antecedently inhabiting a narratable world, then the church must herself be that world.” Read by Ken Myers. 40 minutes. $2.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 20

Guests on Volume 20: Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, on the benefits of single-sex education, and the confusion of "elite" feminism; Robert D. Richardson, Jr., on why the work of Ralph Waldo Emerson continues to attract certain religious seekers; Roger Lundin, on Emerson's assertion of alternatives to Christianity, and how they have seeped under the American cultural skin; Wilfred McClay, on individualism and collectivism in American society; Andrew A. Tadie, on learning to love and learn from G. K. Chesterton; Robert Jenson, on why the life of the mind matters to the Church, and how it should take shape in the world; Ted Prescott, on why artists have been attracted to abstraction, and what viewers should look for in abstract art; and Ted Libbey, on Haydn's The Creation.