People

Stratford Caldecott

Stratford Caldecott (1953-2014) was the founder and director of Oxford's Centre for Faith and Culture and the chief editor of its affiliated journal, Second Spring, with an overseas division at the Thomas More College of Liberal Arts in New Hampshire. He was also chief editor of Humanum—the online journal of the John Paul II Institute in Washington, DC. Formerly a Senior Editor at Routledge, HarperCollins and T&T Clark, he served on the editorial boards of Communio, The Chesterton Review, Oasis, and the Catholic Truth Society in London. Caldecott was the author of several books including Beauty for Truth’s Sake (Brazos, 2009), Beauty in the Word (Angelico Press, 2012), The Radiance of Being (Angelico Press, 2013), and Not as the World Gives (Second Spring Books, 2014).

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 116

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Guests on Volume 116: Stratford Caldecott, on why education should be designed with a deep and wide understanding of human nature and must sustain the unity of knowledge; Fred Bahnson, on how a Christian understanding of God's redemptive work on the earth should influence our practices of growing and sharing food; Eric O. Jacobsen, on how modernism distorted the shape of cities and how Christian reflection on the nature of neighborliness can help restore them; J. Budziszewski, on how meaning in human life transcends a merely biological explanation of our behavior; Brian Brock, on the various ways in which the Church has regarded its obligation to welcome the disabled; and Allen Verhey, on the difference between a "medicalized" death and a death experienced in light of God's cosmic work of redemption.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 102

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Guests on Volume 102: Daniel M. Bell, Jr., on recovering the view that the just war tradition is more about the shaping of character and virtue than a checklist for political leaders; Lew Daly, on how the discussion concerning faith-based initiatives raised larger issues about the identity of social groups in American society; Adam K. Webb, on whether the traditional personal and communal virtues in premodern village life must be abandoned for poverty to be alleviated; Stratford Caldecott, on how denying the reality of beauty is linked to a denial of the coherent meaning of Creation; James Matthew Wilson, on Jacques Maritain's pilgrimage to faith and his subsequent development of a rich philosophy of beauty; and Thomas Hibbs, on the similar projects of painters Georges Rouault (1871-1958) and Makoto Fujimura (b. 1960), and how they each resisted various confusions in modern art.