People

Wilfred McClay

Wilfred M. McClay is the SunTrust Bank Chair of Excellence in Humanities and a professor of history at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Author of The Masterless: Self and Society in Modern America, he joined the faculty at the University of Tennessee after serving on the faculties at, among others, Georgetown University, Tulane University, and Johns Hopkins University. He has also served as a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. He earned his doctorate from Johns Hopkins University and his undergraduate degree from St. John's College.

Additional information about Wilfred McClay is available through the web pages of ISI Books.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 82

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 82: Stephen Gardner on how modern culture weakens religion and establishes a new definition of the public; Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn on Tom Wolfe and Philip Rieff's diagnosis of cultural disorder; Wilfred McClay on how Philip Rieff's brilliant critique of modern disorder kept him from realizing a way out of our dilemma; David Wells on how Western culture has eclipsed fundamental assumptions about human nature and God; James K. A. Smith on the postmodern insight that our experience in the world requires interpretation (and that some interpretations are better than others); and Robert Littlejohn on how education should encourage wisdom and eloquence in students.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 72

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 72: John Polkinghorne, on lessons for theology learned from the inductive nature of the work of science; Francesca Aran Murphy, on the efforts of 20th-century Catholic and French philosopher √Čtienne Gilson to reconcile faith and reason; James Hitchcock, on the history of the Supreme Court's decisions regarding religious practice and liberty; Wilfred McClay, on Nathaniel Hawthorne's vision of the intractability of human failings and the possibilities of the American experiment, and on the theme of place and communal obligation in Nathaniel Hawthorne's writing; Philip McFarland, on how Hawthorne's sensitivity to the darker side of human nature makes him perennially instructive; and David Hackett Fischer, on the history of how Americans have understood and symbolized freedom and liberty.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 31

Guests on Volume 31: David Orgon Coolidge, on Dale v. Boy Scouts, which requires the Scouts to admit homosexuals; James Twitchell, on how American culture has eliminated shame from our experience; Thomas Frank, on how advertisers came to link their products with the idea of self-fulfillment; Keith Windschuttle, on the killing of the discipline of history; Wilfred McClay, on history and academic advancement; David Harlan, on history as moral reflection; Wilfred McClay, on historian David Harlan; and Gilbert Meilaender, on C. S. Lewis's self-denying gospel.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 20

Guests on Volume 20: Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, on the benefits of single-sex education, and the confusion of "elite" feminism; Robert D. Richardson, Jr., on why the work of Ralph Waldo Emerson continues to attract certain religious seekers; Roger Lundin, on Emerson's assertion of alternatives to Christianity, and how they have seeped under the American cultural skin; Wilfred McClay, on individualism and collectivism in American society; Andrew A. Tadie, on learning to love and learn from G. K. Chesterton; Robert Jenson, on why the life of the mind matters to the Church, and how it should take shape in the world; Ted Prescott, on why artists have been attracted to abstraction, and what viewers should look for in abstract art; and Ted Libbey, on Haydn's The Creation.