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William T. Cavanaugh

William T. Cavanaugh is Professor of Theology at DePaul University in Chicago, having also taught Theology at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. His research expertise is in systematic theology and social ethics, including economics and just war theory. Cavanaugh is a member of the American Academy of Religion, the Society of Christian Ethics, and the Catholic Theological Society of America. After receiving his M.A. in Theology and Religious Studies from Cambridge University, he received a Ph.D. in Religion from Duke University in 1996.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 134

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Guests on Volume 134: Chris Armstrong, on what C. S. Lewis knew (and we need to know) about the culture and faith of medieval Christianity; Grevel Lindop, on the unique poetic imagination of poet, novelist, and theologian Charles Williams, “the third Inkling”; Michael Martin, on how the experience of Beauty in Creation and art can enable an encounter with divine Wisdom; William T. Cavanaugh, on why Christians should think about economics theologically, not just as a science or an ethical discipline; Philip Turner, on why Christian ethics has the health of the Church at its center, not just personal obedience or social justice; Gisela Kreglinger, on wine, the culture of wine, and the superabundant goodness of God made manifest in the gift of wine.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 109

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Guests on Volume 109: Douglas Coupland, on the strange and wonderful life and thought of media guru Marshall McLuhan; Charles Mathewes, on lessons from Augustine on thinking about our political lives in theological terms; William T. Cavanaugh, on how the modern state is a unique kind of political entity, inviting a new kind of idolatry; William Dyrness, on the challenges of developing a positive theology of desire and the imagination; Steven Guthrie, on relating the Spirit's work in making us human to what happens in art and human creativity; and Susannah Clements, on the changing view of evil evident in the evolution of vampires from Bram Stoker to Sookie Stackhouse.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 101

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Guests on Volume 101: James Davison Hunter, on how the most prominent strategies of Christian cultural engagement are based on a misunderstanding about how cultures work; Paul Spears, on why Christian scholars need to understand their disciplines in ways that depart from conventional understanding; Steven Loomis, on why education needs to attend more carefully to nonquantifiable aspects of human experience; James K. A. Smith, on how education always involves the formation of affections and how the form of Christian education should imitate patterns of formation evident in historic Christian liturgy; Thomas Long, on how funeral practices have the capacity to convey an understanding of the meaning of discipleship and death; and William T. Cavanaugh, on the distinctly modern definition of "religion" and how the conventional account of the "Wars of Religion" misrepresents the facts in the interest of consolidating state power.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 95

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Guests on Volume 95: Stewart Davenport, on how nineteenth-century Christians separated the moral and practical aspects of economic life; William T. Cavanaugh, on how theology and economics are necessarily intertwined and on how a larger understanding of the meaning of "freedom" would change our economic actions; J. Matthew Bonzo & Michael R. Stevens, on Wendell Berry's concern for the dislocating and fragmenting forces in modern life; Craig Gay, on how language—specifically the spoken word—is central to our human experience; Eugene Peterson, on how Jesus' use of ambiguous language encouraged active spiritual engagement; and Barry Hankins, on how the late Francis Schaeffer moved from being a defensive fundamentalist to a prophet of cultural engagement.