Product Type

Journals

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 121

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 121: Daniel Gabelman, on how George MacDonald’s celebration of the “childlike” promotes levity and a joyful sense of play, rooted in filial trust of the Father; Curtis White, on the troubling enthusiasm for accounts of the human person that reduce us to mere meat and wetware; Michael Hanby, on why there is no “neutral” science, how all accounts of what science does and why contain metaphysical and theological assumptions; Alan Jacobs, on why the Book of Common Prayer has lived such a long and influential life; James K. A. Smith, on how some movements in modern philosophy provide resources for recovering an appreciation for the role of the body in knowing the world; and Bruce Herman and Walter Hansen, on Herman’s paintings and how conversing about works of art enables us to grow in understanding of the non-verbal meaning they convey.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 120

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 120: Douglas Rushkoff, on the experience of “present shock” and the consequent loss of belief in the capability of stories to convey the shape of reality to us; Phillip Thompson, on Thomas Merton's lifelong concern about the disorienting effects of the technological mindset; Jonathan Wilson, on how the life of the Trinity—a life of interpersonal giving and receiving—is the model of life within Creation, calling us to lives of generosity; James Bratt, on the life and thought of Abraham Kuyper, and on some of his early influences; D. C. Schindler, on how consciousness and reason are “ecstatic,” and necessarily involve reaching outside of ourselves; and Paul Elie, on how access to recordings enables a deeper understanding of music, and how the experience of Bach's music benefits from such depth.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 119

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 119: Mary Eberstadt, on how the decline of formation of natural families has made Christian belief less plausible and contributed to the secularization of Europe; Allan Bevere, on why the claim by “empire criticism” that the letter to the Colossians is a veiled repudiation of Roman imperial hubris is mistaken; Peter J. Leithart, on how the Bible evaluates empires in light of their relationship with the people of God; Steven Boyer, on why “mystery” is a necessary category in Christian theology; Karen Dieleman, on how different liturgical practices of Victorian congregationalism, Anglo-Catholicism, and Roman Catholicism influenced the poetry of Elizabeth Barret Browning, Christina Rossetti, and Adelaide Proctor; and Peter Phillips, on the founding of The Tallis Scholars and the peculiar beauty of Renaissance polyphony.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 118

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 118: Gilbert Meilaender, on the ethical questions raised by anti-aging research, especially its most extreme forms in the "transhumanist" movement; Ron Highfield, on why the modern assumptions about personal identity, freedom, and human dignity create prejudices against the Gospel's account of God and the self; Mark Mitchell, on why gratitude and stewardship should be seen as fundamental political postures; Daniel M. Bell, Jr., on how capitalism nurtures the assumption of the autonomous self; Helen Rhee, on the centrality of almsgiving to Christian identity in the early Church; and Peter Brown, on how the early Church's wrestling with the questions of wealth and poverty steered a course between radical asceticism and careless indulgence.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 117

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 117: Matthew Dickerson, on the likenesses between Beowulf and three of Tolkien’s heroes, and on how (despite Peter Jackson’s rendition) The Lord of the Rings is more interested in virtue than in military exploits; Jennifer Woodruff Tait, on how assumptions about the nature of moral knowledge—derived from the school of common-sense realism—compelled Victorian Methodists and others to substitute grape juice for wine in celebrating the Lord’s Supper; Jeffry Davis and Philip Ryken, on why the liberal arts ought to be recognized as a calling that enriches Christian living; and Robert George, on the consequences of redefining marriage.

The MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Our flagship product, the MARS HILL AUDIO Journal, is an "audio magazine" featuring over one hundred minutes of conversation with perceptive and engaging thinkers on each bimonthly CD or MP3 edition.  Guests on the Journal examine the ideas, institutions, preoccupations, and fashionable assumptions that shape our cultural lives.  They include scholars from a wide range of disciplines, most of whom are authors of recent books investigating some aspect of our cultural experience and the interaction of ideas, practices, and institutions that have created the conditions in whi

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 116

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 116: Stratford Caldecott, on why education should be designed with a deep and wide understanding of human nature and must sustain the unity of knowledge; Fred Bahnson, on how a Christian understanding of God's redemptive work on the earth should influence our practices of growing and sharing food; Eric O. Jacobsen, on how modernism distorted the shape of cities and how Christian reflection on the nature of neighborliness can help restore them; J. Budziszewski, on how meaning in human life transcends a merely biological explanation of our behavior; Brian Brock, on the various ways in which the Church has regarded its obligation to welcome the disabled; and Allen Verhey, on the difference between a "medicalized" death and a death experienced in light of God's cosmic work of redemption.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 115

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 115: Arlie Russell Hochschild, on how the reliance in personal life on professional consultants establishes market-shaped models for imagining personal identity; Andrew Davison, on why a fully Christian approach to apologetics requires a Christian understanding of reason; Adrian Pabst, on why only a Christian understanding of God and Creation can provide the ground for understanding the order of reality; Gary Colledge, on the centrality of Christian belief to the writings and social concerns of Charles Dickens; Linda Lewis, on how Charles Dickens assumed in his readers a basic Biblical literacy, and so constructed his stories in a sort of conversation with the teaching of Jesus; and Thomas Bergler, on how the Church's captivity to youth culture eclipses concern for (or even a belief in the possibility of) Christian maturity.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 114

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 114: Susan Cain, on how the 20th-century displacement of character by "personality" encouraged Americans to sell themselves (and marginalize introverts); Brad S. Gregory, on the danger of assuming that previous epochs of history have no lasting influence, and how unintended consequences of the Reformation shrunk Christian cultural influence; David Sehat, on why the story of religious liberty in America is more complicated than is often acknowledged; Augustine Thompson, O.P., on the myths and realities of St. Francis of Assisi; Gerald R. McDermott, on how love and beauty are more fundamental in the thought of Jonathan Edwards than the image of an angry God; and Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, on lessons in The Scarlet Letter about wise ways of reading complex texts.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 113

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 113: Steven Shapin, on whether or not there is a single thing called "science," and whether scientists are united by a single "scientific method"; Arthur Boers, on why the ways in which technologies shape our lives should be recognized as spiritual and pastoral challenges; Christine Pohl, on why a deliberate commitment to certain shared practices is necessary for the sustaining of community; Norman Wirzba, on how attentiveness to our eating and our care of the land are central aspects of culture and of godly faith; Craig Bartholomew, on carelessness concerning embodied experience and our "crisis of place"; and David I. Smith, on how the forms of pedagogical practices ought to be crafted to correspond to the content of teaching.

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