Topics

Apologetics

Areopagus Lecture 5

Alison Milbank: Imaginative Apologetics beyond C. S. Lewis

Available for mp3 purchase
In Alison Milbank's Areopagus Lecture, titled “Imaginative Apologetics beyond C. S. Lewis,” Milbank offers an approach to defending the Christian faith that restores the imagination as a faculty inseparable from reason. By using C. S. Lewis as a conversation partner — along with Owen Barfield, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, G. K. Chesterton, and Novalis — Milbank explores how the imagination is not just an instrumental means to an objective end, but the ecstatic and receptive means by which we participate in what is True and Real. $4.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 135

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 135: Bob Cutillo, on the importance of understanding health as a gift; Hans Boersma, on recovering the patristic recognition of the sacramental presence of Christ in the Old Testatment; Dana Gioia, on the devout life and distinctive poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins; Matthew Levering, on the history of proofs of God’s existence, and what we learn about reason when we reason about God; Bruce Gordon, on his “biography” of John Calvin’s Institutes of the Christian Religion; and Markus Rathey, on the dramatic and liturgical character of the major vocal works of Johann Sebastian Bach.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 115

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 115: Arlie Russell Hochschild, on how the reliance in personal life on professional consultants establishes market-shaped models for imagining personal identity; Andrew Davison, on why a fully Christian approach to apologetics requires a Christian understanding of reason; Adrian Pabst, on why only a Christian understanding of God and Creation can provide the ground for understanding the order of reality; Gary Colledge, on the centrality of Christian belief to the writings and social concerns of Charles Dickens; Linda Lewis, on how Charles Dickens assumed in his readers a basic Biblical literacy, and so constructed his stories in a sort of conversation with the teaching of Jesus; and Thomas Bergler, on how the Church's captivity to youth culture eclipses concern for (or even a belief in the possibility of) Christian maturity.

MARS HILL AUDIO Anthology 6

The Christian Humanism of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Available for mp3 purchase
The death of Solzhenitsyn in 2008 provided an opportunity to reassess the life and work of this remarkable figure, whose accomplishment is discussed on this Anthology. Ken Myers talks with the late Edward E. Ericson, Jr. (Solzhenitsyn and the Modern World and co-author of The Soul and Barbed Wire), David Aikman (Great Souls: Six Who Changed the Century), and James Pontuso (Solzhenitsyn's Political Thought) about the conditions and experiences that transformed Solzhenitsyn from a committed Communist schoolteacher to a Nobel Prize-winning novelist and the global symbol of heroic resistance to tyranny. One of the main themes emphasized by these three guests is that Solzhenitsyn was not principally concerned with politics, but with human nature and purpose, understood in light of the Christian account of reality. 73 minutes. $6.

MARS HILL AUDIO Anthology 5

The Christian Mind of C.S. Lewis

Available for mp3 purchase
In this Anthology, Ken Myers talks with Clyde Kilby about Lewis’s view of the imagination; with Michael Aeschliman about Lewis’s reasonable distrust of trusting reason too much; with James Como about the rhetorical genius in Lewis’s writing; with Bruce L. Edwards, Jr. about what his students learn from Lewis’s integration of faith and life; with Thomas Howard about the deep meaning of Till We Have Faces; and with Gilbert Meilaender about the surprising approach of Lewis’s apologetics. The program concludes with Alan Jacobs’s reading of his 1998 essay, “Lewis at 100.” 73 minutes. $6.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 57

Guests on Volume 57: John Hare, on why morality makes sense only on Christian grounds; Clifford Putney, on "muscular Christianity" and the origins of the YMCA; Andrei S. Markovits, on modernity, sports, and soccer in America; Wilmer Mills, on time, narrative, and the sequences of life, and on two of his poems; Steve Bruce, on diversity, individualism, secularization, and the atrophy of faith, and on why rational choice theory doesn't apply to religion; Colleen Carroll, on The New Faithful: Why Young Adults Are Embracing Christian Orthodoxy; and Michael Budde & Robert Brimlow, Christianity Incorporated, on why Christianity should seem strange.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 33

Guests on Volume 33: Elizabeth Haiken, on Venus Envy: A History of Cosmetic Surgery; Patrick Glynn, on recovering belief; Thomas Howard, on C. S. Lewis's Till We Have Faces; David Wells, on how our culture distracts us from remembering moral nature; Peter Heslam, on Abraham Kuyper, Calvinist theologian and statesman; Suzanna Sherry, on the assault on truth in legal scholarship; Ted Libbey, on Felix Mendelssohn's oratorios, Elijah and Paulus; and David Wells, on the contrast between classic and postmodern spirituality.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 11

Guests on Volume 11: Richard Skolnik, on Baseball and the Pursuit of Innocence: A Fresh Look at the Old Ball Game; Laura Nash, on the influence of religious faith in the marketplace; Dick Keyes, on heroism, character, and the imitation of Christ; Douglas LeBlanc, on musings on mortality by the Crash Test Dummies; Ken Myers, on Michael Moore's TV Nation and terminal irony in prime time; Gene Edward Veith, on communicating truth to a cynical age; Alan Jacobs, on Chinua Achebe and the dilemma of living between two cultures; and Ted Libbey, on Beethoven's Missa Solemnis.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 3

Guests on Volume 3: Andrew Kimbrell, on the bioethical issues discussed in The Human Body Shop; Allan C. Carlson, on From Cottage to Workstation: The Family's Search for Social Harmony in the Industrial Age; Larry Woiwode, on Flannery O'Connor, John Updike, and what fiction is good for; Peter Kreeft, on the reasonableness of faith, the devilishness of deconstructionism, and The Snakebite Letters; Alan Jacobs, on The Children of Men by P. D. James; Thomas Morris, on Blaise Pascal and why people still ask the Big Questions; Jay Tolson, on how Walker Percy's search for authenticity led to his conversion; and John Hodges, on the popularity of Henryck Gorecki's Third Symphony.