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MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 17

Maker of Middle-Earth

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While it is not a story set in the twentieth century, Tom Shippey (author of J. R. R. Tolkien: Author of the Century) claims that The Lord of the Rings is very much a work of the twentieth century; the momentum of evil sweeps characters into action before they understand the events in which they are involved. Joseph Pearce (author of Tolkien: Man and Myth) defends The Lord of the Rings fantasy genre against those who would claim that realistic fiction is a better vessel for truth; because mythology is stripped of the factual, he explains, it can deal with truth unencumbered and therefore convey its moral more directly. Literary critic Ralph C. Wood explains why he has been drawn to J. R. R. Tolkien's moral Middle-Earth since his first reading of The Lord of the Rings in the 1960s. It is a world ordered by heroism, friendship, loyalty, and hope. These ties alone, he states, enable the hobbits to complete their quest and go where no one else can. 86 minutes. $6.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 27

Guests on Volume 27: John Horgan, on whether or not we're coming to the end of the age of science; Keith Devlin, on the limits of logic; Robert Kanigel, on modern industrial efficiency; Kate Campbell, on music and memories; Patrick Samway, on Walker Percy: A Life; J. Budziszewski, on tolerance and the law "written on the heart"; Jeff Johnson, on his recordings with flutist Brian Dunning; and Stephen Lawhead, on retelling the Arthurian legends.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 26

Guests on Volume 26: James Gilbert, on how science and religion negotiate for public respect; William Everdell, on the meaning and method of modernism; David Walsh, on the genius of liberal democracy; Alan Jacobs, on The Dictionary of Global Culture and "Real" Global Culture; Jeffrey Meikle, on American Plastic: A Cultural History; Jeffrey Burton Russell, on A History of Heaven: The Singing Silence; Roger Lundin, on Harry Mulisch's novel, The Discovery of Heaven; and Gordon Kreplin, on music, craft, gift, and beauty.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 23

Guests on Volume 23: John Steadman Rice, on how the idea of codependency is based on tenets of "liberation psychotherapy"; E. D. Hirsch, Jr., on The Schools We Need and Why We Don't Have Them; Ted McAllister, on Revolt Against Modernity: Leo Strauss, Eric Voeglin, and the Search for a Postliberal Order; Judith Skelton Grant, on Robertson Davies: Man of Myth; Terry Teachout, on why music should not be propagandistic; John Boyle, on his Requiem for the Unborn; Leland Ryken, on what makes a classic and how we should read one; and Daniel Ritchie, on a Biblical view of language and literature.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 21

Guests on Volume 21: James Twitchell, on ways advertising shapes (and thins out) American culture; Lynne Cheney, on the politics of ideas in higher education; Peter Berkowitz, on how Friedrich Nietzsche was torn between certainty of the "death of God" and belief in the divinity of truth; Ron Hansen, on what makes good fiction; Frederica Mathewes-Green, on "The America We Seek," an important pro-life manifesto; Robert Higgs, on how professional sports have lost a sense of play; Terry Eastland, on why affirmative action is ending; and Ted Libbey, on Brahms's German Requiem.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 20

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Guests on Volume 20: Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, on the benefits of single-sex education, and the confusion of "elite" feminism; Robert D. Richardson, Jr., on why the work of Ralph Waldo Emerson continues to attract certain religious seekers; Roger Lundin, on Emerson's assertion of alternatives to Christianity, and how they have seeped under the American cultural skin; Wilfred McClay, on individualism and collectivism in American society; Andrew A. Tadie, on learning to love and learn from G. K. Chesterton; Robert Jenson, on why the life of the mind matters to the Church, and how it should take shape in the world; Ted Prescott, on why artists have been attracted to abstraction, and what viewers should look for in abstract art; and Ted Libbey, on Haydn's The Creation.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 18

Guests on Volume 18: Leigh Eric Schmidt, on how the marketplace has shaped American celebration of the holidays; John Patrick Diggins, on how pragmatism fails to offer a coherent way of understanding of the world; Joseph Frank, on moral themes in the fiction of Fyodor Dostoevsky; Thomas Howard, on the supernatural thrillers of Charles Williams; Ken Myers, on Marsalis on Music, a book and a video series on music appreciation; Deal Hudson, on the themes of family in the work of Sigrid Undset, author of Kristin Lavransdatter and The Master of Hestviken; George McKenna, on how President Lincoln might have fought abortion; and Ted Libbey, on master English composer Henry Purcell.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 17

Guests on Volume 17: Alan Jacobs, on the seafaring fiction of novelist Patrick O'Brian; Barry Sanders, on the deeper dynamics of literacy; Mark Slouka, on bizarre Gnostic temptations in cyberspace; Alan Ehrenhalt, on how valuing choice hurts community; Geoffrey T. Holtz, on twenty-somethings and the shape of family life; Mardi Keyes, on dubious assumptions about the nature of adolescence; W. Bradford Wilcox, on tradition and belief; Glenn Loury, on race and relationships; and John Hodges, on the influence of Russian Orthodoxy in the music of John Tavener.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 16

Guests on Volume 16: Philip Cushman, on the cultural history of psychotherapy in America; R. Laurence Moore, on religious disestablishment and the growth imperative; Keith J. Pavlischek, on the shrinking foundations supporting religious liberty; Dean M. Kelley, on the government's deadly interpretation of the Branch Davidian religion; Alan Jacobs, on the storytelling powers of neurologist Oliver Sacks; Kathleen Murphy, on Ingmar Bergman's films and the lack of seriousness in contemporary film; Michael Allen Gillespie, on the medieval (and theological) sources of nihilism; Robert Wilken, on similarities between the early Church's culture and our own; and Francis Crociata, on the music of American composer Leo Sowerby.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 13

Guests on Volume 13: Richard Noll, on the influence of paganism in the life and thought of C. G. Jung; Armand Nicholi, on Sigmund Freud's religious longings; Jackson Lears, on how advertising detaches us from the world; Alan Jacobs, on Anne Rice and the popularity of her vampire novels; Ken Myers, on reporting about religion; Rand & Robyn Miller, on MYST, the bestselling computer game; Sven Birkerts, on how the act of reading assists in building self-understanding; Stephen G. Smith, on his magazine Civilization, produced in cooperation with the Library of Congress; and Deal Hudson, on the return of melody in modern music.

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