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Commercialism

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 115

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 115: Arlie Russell Hochschild, on how the reliance in personal life on professional consultants establishes market-shaped models for imagining personal identity; Andrew Davison, on why a fully Christian approach to apologetics requires a Christian understanding of reason; Adrian Pabst, on why only a Christian understanding of God and Creation can provide the ground for understanding the order of reality; Gary Colledge, on the centrality of Christian belief to the writings and social concerns of Charles Dickens; Linda Lewis, on how Charles Dickens assumed in his readers a basic Biblical literacy, and so constructed his stories in a sort of conversation with the teaching of Jesus; and Thomas Bergler, on how the Church's captivity to youth culture eclipses concern for (or even a belief in the possibility of) Christian maturity.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 48

Guests on Volume 48: Jon Butler, on the United States as a modern society—in 1776; Gary Cross, on An All-Consuming Century: Why Commercialism Won in Modern America; Zygmunt Bauman, on the loss of permanence and solidity; Pico Iyer, on The Global Soul: Jet Lag, Shopping Malls, and the Search for Home; Richard Stivers, on sex and violence in media and the rule of technology; Larry Woiwode, on stories and giving form to experience; Alan Jacobs, on Philip Pullman's "His Dark Materials" trilogy; and James Trott, on poetry and piety.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 39

Guests on Volume 39: Neal Gabler, on how entertainment has become the highest value in our culture; C. John Sommerville, on How the News Makes Us Dumb: The Death of Wisdom in an Information Society; John L. Locke, on the value of personal interaction, and how technology is displacing it; Vigen Guroian, on gardening; Marion Montgomery, on how higher education has lost its way; Peter Berkowitz, on why liberal democracies need virtuous citizens; Harry Clor, on the need for the law to return to encouraging a public morality; and Ted Libbey, on French composer Francis Poulenc.