Topics

Counterculture

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 65

Guests on Volume 65: Stephen G. Post, on why there should be more room for public forms of religious expression; Glenn C. Altschuler, on the advent of rock 'n' roll, and the various fears it created; Mark Oppenheimer, on the importance of style and the rise of radical informality; Johnny Cash, on faith, vocation, the Incarnation, and the Last Supper; George Marsden, on how Jonathan Edwards understood world history and the American experience; and Julian Johnson, on various misunderstandings about classical music, the differences between music as art and music as commodity, and on expectations of immediate gratification in music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 57

Guests on Volume 57: John Hare, on why morality makes sense only on Christian grounds; Clifford Putney, on "muscular Christianity" and the origins of the YMCA; Andrei S. Markovits, on modernity, sports, and soccer in America; Wilmer Mills, on time, narrative, and the sequences of life, and on two of his poems; Steve Bruce, on diversity, individualism, secularization, and the atrophy of faith, and on why rational choice theory doesn't apply to religion; Colleen Carroll, on The New Faithful: Why Young Adults Are Embracing Christian Orthodoxy; and Michael Budde & Robert Brimlow, Christianity Incorporated, on why Christianity should seem strange.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 54

Guests on Volume 54: Robert P. Kraynak, on Christian Faith and Modern Democracy: God and Politics in the Fallen World; Mitchell L. Stevens, on home schooling and the individuality of children; Ralph C. Wood, on the Christian achievement of detective novelist P. D. James; Mark Henrie, on the films of Whit Stillman and the overcoming of irony; Terry Lindvall, on the responses of American churches to the advent of motion pictures; Richard J. Mouw, on sin, culture, and common grace; and Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, on her book In Quiet Light: Poems on Vermeer's Women.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 31

Guests on Volume 31: David Orgon Coolidge, on Dale v. Boy Scouts, which requires the Scouts to admit homosexuals; James Twitchell, on how American culture has eliminated shame from our experience; Thomas Frank, on how advertisers came to link their products with the idea of self-fulfillment; Keith Windschuttle, on the killing of the discipline of history; Wilfred McClay, on history and academic advancement; David Harlan, on history as moral reflection; Wilfred McClay, on historian David Harlan; and Gilbert Meilaender, on C. S. Lewis's self-denying gospel.