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Discipleship

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 115

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Guests on Volume 115: Arlie Russell Hochschild, on how the reliance in personal life on professional consultants establishes market-shaped models for imagining personal identity; Andrew Davison, on why a fully Christian approach to apologetics requires a Christian understanding of reason; Adrian Pabst, on why only a Christian understanding of God and Creation can provide the ground for understanding the order of reality; Gary Colledge, on the centrality of Christian belief to the writings and social concerns of Charles Dickens; Linda Lewis, on how Charles Dickens assumed in his readers a basic Biblical literacy, and so constructed his stories in a sort of conversation with the teaching of Jesus; and Thomas Bergler, on how the Church's captivity to youth culture eclipses concern for (or even a belief in the possibility of) Christian maturity.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 101

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Guests on Volume 101: James Davison Hunter, on how the most prominent strategies of Christian cultural engagement are based on a misunderstanding about how cultures work; Paul Spears, on why Christian scholars need to understand their disciplines in ways that depart from conventional understanding; Steven Loomis, on why education needs to attend more carefully to nonquantifiable aspects of human experience; James K. A. Smith, on how education always involves the formation of affections and how the form of Christian education should imitate patterns of formation evident in historic Christian liturgy; Thomas Long, on how funeral practices have the capacity to convey an understanding of the meaning of discipleship and death; and William T. Cavanaugh, on the distinctly modern definition of "religion" and how the conventional account of the "Wars of Religion" misrepresents the facts in the interest of consolidating state power.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 82

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Guests on Volume 82: Stephen Gardner on how modern culture weakens religion and establishes a new definition of the public; Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn on Tom Wolfe and Philip Rieff's diagnosis of cultural disorder; Wilfred McClay on how Philip Rieff's brilliant critique of modern disorder kept him from realizing a way out of our dilemma; David Wells on how Western culture has eclipsed fundamental assumptions about human nature and God; James K. A. Smith on the postmodern insight that our experience in the world requires interpretation (and that some interpretations are better than others); and Robert Littlejohn on how education should encourage wisdom and eloquence in students.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 76

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Guests on Volume 76: D. H. Williams on the Church's rootedness in its Tradition, why some Protestants remain suspicious, and on the excluding character of Christian conversion; Catherine Edwards Sanders on the spiritual hunger behind the rise of modern witchcraft; Ted Prescott on changing images of beauty and the human figure in 20th century art; Martin X. Moleski on the life, times, and remarkable insights of Michael Polanyi; Stephen Prickett on George MacDonald and the tasks of imagination; and Barrett Fisher on the relative artistic assets of film and literature.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 38

Guests on Volume 38: Craig Gay, on how modern culture encourages atheism; Alvin Kernan, on why the academy can't afford to be too democratic; Erik Davis, on myth, magic, and mysticism in the age of information; Marva Dawn, on teaching children about being the Church; Wendy Shalit, on the lost virtue of female modesty; Marva Dawn, on sexual education and the Church's children; Leon Podles, on why men are often alienated from Christianity; and Dan Blazer, on the incomplete conversation between psychiatry and Christianity.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 36

Guests on Volume 36: Vigen Guroian, on cultivating virtue in children; James Tunstead Burtchaell, on how church-related colleges become secularized; Dallas Willard, on training church leaders; Robert Wuthnow, on how spiritual seekers understand their beliefs; Thomas Oden, on why the contemporary Church must learn from the early Church; Darrel Amundsen, on the early Church's views on suicide; Edward J. Larson, on what really happened at the Scopes trial; and Roger Lundin, on Emily Dickinson.